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Full text of "Bulletin of Wake Forest University"

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BULLETIN OF 
WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY 

CATALOG ISSUE 



WINSTON-SALEM 



NORTH CAROLINA 







JANUARY 1974 

FOR STUDENTS ENTERING IN 

ACADEMIC YEAR 1974-75 



MMMM 







Wait Chapel 



New Series 



January 1974 



Vol. LXIX, No. 1 



BULLETIN OF 



Wake Forest 
University 










>*xrsss/'' 



GENERAL CATALOG ISSUE 

ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-NINTH YEAR 
ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1974-1975 



The Bulletin of Wake Forest University is published seven times annually by 

the. University at Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Correspondence and 

changes of address notices should be mailed to Wake Forest 

University, Winston-Salem, N. C, 27109 (or 27103 

for Bowman Gray School of Medicine) . 

Second-class postage paid at Winston-Salem, N. C. 27109 



CORRESPONDENCE 

Inquiries to the University should be addressed as indicated 
below: 

Admissions Director of Admissions 

Alumni Affairs Director of Alumni Affairs 

Athletics Director of Athletics 

Business Administration 

and Management Dean of Babcock Graduate 

School of Management 

Catalogs Director of Admissions 

Financial Matters Vice President for Business 

and Finance 

General Policy of the 

University . President 

Gifts and Bequests President 

Graduate Studies Dean of the Graduate School 

Housing Director of Housing 

Law Dean of School of Law 

Medicine Director of Admissions 

Bowman Gray School of 
Medicine, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 27103 

Placement Director of Placement 

Public Relations and 

Development Program President 

Scholarships Committee on Scholarships 

Student Affairs Dean of the College 

Summer Session Dean of Summer Session 

Transcripts Registrar 

All addresses, except Medicine, are: 

Wake Forest University, Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 27109 



CONTENTS 

Page 

General Information 7 

Admission 14 

Admissions, of Freshmen, Transfer Candidates, Summer 

School, Graduate and Professional Schools 

Fees and Expenses 21 

Tuition & Fees, Housing Charges, Estimated Personal 
Expenses 

Financial Assistance 25 

Scholarships, Loans and part-time employment, Veterans 
benefits 

Educational Resources 39 

History, physical facilities, libraries, art collection 

Student Community 59 

College Union, Student Government, Honor System, 
Residence Councils, Debating, Dramatics, Musical Activ- 
ities, Publications, Radio Station, Religious opportunities, 
Social Clubs, Fraternities, Societies, Special Lectures, 
Sports, Intramural Athletics, Inter-collegiate Athletics, 
Medals and other Awards 

Services 73 

Advising and orientation, housing, food services, Reading 
Improvement Program for University Students, health 
service, placement, counseling and career advising, Hu- 
man Enterprises Institute, Urban Affairs Institute, Pied- 
mont University Center, The Institute of Literature, 
Ecumenical Institute, Robinson Lectures, University 
Artists Series, Navy ROC program 

General Academic Information 84 

Honors 

Wake Forest Abroad 
Courses at Salem College 
Requirements for Degrees: 

Academic Standards and Regulations 98 

Courses in the College 113 

Graduate and Professional Schools 192 

Graduate School 

Babcock Graduate School of Management 

School of Law 

Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

Summer Session 

Trustees and Committees 208 

Officers of the Administration 211 

Faculty and Standing Committees 218 

Degrees Conferred 253 

Enrollment and Geographical Distribution 270 

Index of Topics 278 



1974 







JUNE 






s 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 
1 
8 


2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 


9 


10 


11 12 13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 19 20 21 


22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


30 











UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 



Summer Session 1974 



JULY 




S M T W T 


F S 


12 3 4 


5 6 


7 8 9 10 11 


12 13 


14 15 16 17 18 


19 20 


21 22 23 24 25 


26 27 


28 29 30 31 







AUGUST 






S 


M T W 


T 


F 


S 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 23 24 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



June 


10 


Monday 


Registration First 
Term (four weeks 
and eight weeks) 


June 


10 


Monday 


Classes begin 


July 


6 


Saturday 


First Term ends 


July 


8 


Monday 


Registration Second 
Term 


July 


8 


Monday 


Classes begin 


July 


19 


Saturday 


Six Weeks Term 
Ends 


August 


3 


Saturday 


Second Term ends 



Fall Term 1974 





SEPTEMBER 




s 


M 


T W 


T F 


S 


1 


2 


3 4 


5 6 


7 


8 


9 


10 11 


12 13 


14 


15 


16 


17 18 


19 20 21 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


29 30 









OCTOBER 




S M T W T F 


S 


12 3 4 


5 


6 7 8 9 10 11 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 18 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 25 


26 


27 28 29 30 31 







NOVEMBER 




S 


M 


T W T 


F 

1 


S 
2 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 23 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 





DECEMBER 




S 


M T 


W 


T F 


S 


1 


2 3 


4 


5 6 


7 


8 


9 10 


11 


12 13 


14 


15 


16 17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


29 30 31 









August 


22 


Thursday 


9:00 Residence 
halls open 


August 
August 


23 
25 


Friday 
Sunday 


11:00 Cafeteria open 
] Orientation for new 
j freshmen and 
transfer students 


August 
August 


26 

27 


Monday 
Tuesday 


| Registration of new 
^ students 


August 


28 


Wednesday 


Classes begin 


August 


29 


Thursday 


Convocation 


September 


21 


Friday 


Last day for adding 
courses 


September 


26 


Thursday 


I grades of last 

spring term 

become F 
Last day for 

dropping courses 

without penalty 


October 


26 


Saturday 


Homecoming 


November 
December 


28 
1 


Thursday 
Sunday 


] Thanksgiving 
^ Holiday 


December 


2 


Monday 


Classes resume 


December 


12 


Thursday 


Reading Day 


December 


13 


Friday 


Examinations begin 


December 


20 


Friday 


Examinations end 


December 
January 


21 
9 


Saturday 
Wednesday 


1 Christmas recess 



1975 





JANUARY 




s 


M T 


W 


T F 


S 






1 


2 3 


4 


5 


6 7 


8 


9 10 


11 


12 


13 14 


15 


16 17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 23 24 25 


26 27 28 29 30 31 





Winter Term 1975 





FEBRUARY 




s 


M 


T W T F 


S 
1 
8 


2 


3 


4 5 6 7 


9 


10 


11 12 13 14 


15 


16 


17 


18 19 20 21 


22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 









MARCH 






S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 
1 

8 


i 2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 


9 


10 


11 12 13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 19 20 21 


22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


30 31 













APRIL 






S 


M 


T W 


T 


F 


S 






1 2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 16 


17 


18 


19 


20 21 


22 23 24 25 26 


27 28 29 30 













MAY 






S 


M 


T W 


T 


F 


S 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 23 24 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



January 
January 


10 
11 


Friday 
Saturday 


[• Registration 


January 


13 


Monday 


Classes begin 


February 


10 


Monday 


Classes begin for 
eleven weeks term 






Spring Term 1975 


January 


10 


Friday 


I Registration 


January 


11 


Saturday 




January 


13 


Monday 


Classes begin 


January 


27 


Monday 


Last day for adding 
courses 


February 


6 


Thursday 


Founders' Day 
Convocation 


February 


10 


Monday 


Classes begin for 

eleven weeks term 
CI grades of last fall 
j term become F 
j Last day for 


February 


10 


Monday 


<J dropping course 
j without penalty 
| in fifteen weeks 
[term 


March 


5 


Wednesday 


Last day for 

dropping courses 
in eleven weeks 
term 


* March 
April 


29 
6 


Saturday 
Sunday 


I Spring Recess 


April 


7 


Monday 


Classes Resume 


April 


17 


Monday 


Last day for 
payment of 
reservation deposit 
for next year 


April 


7 


Monday 


s Sophomore 

i conferences with 


April 


19 


Saturday 


* advisers 


May 


5 


Monday 


Examinations begin 


May 


7 


Wednesday 


Reading Day 


May 


13 


Tuesday 


Examinations end 


May 


15 


Thursday 


Last senior grades 
due in Registrar's 
office 


May 


18 


Sunday 


Baccalaureate 
Sermon 


May 


19 


Monday 


Graduation 



*Spring recess for students registered in Education 251 will coincide with the Easter 
recess of the Public Schools. 



OVERVIEW 

WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY is composed of a college of 
Arts and Sciences, a Graduate School, a School of Law, the 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine, and the Babcock Graduate 
School of Management. The University is privately endowed, 
and affiliated with the Baptist State Convention of North Caro- 
lina and is dedicated to the service of humanity. Its present rank 
among the best of the small private universities is the result of 
long and dedicated effort by hundreds of friends, faculty, alumni, 
and generous benefactors. 

Wake Forest provides an atmosphere where students can pur- 
sue personal development to the maximum degree of individual 
capabilities. Proud of its heritage and circumspect in the re- 
sponsible use of freedom, Wake Forest is eager to encourage the 
spirit of free inquiry. 

It seeks faculty and administrators who have a commitment 
to the search for knowledge, who have an awareness of their own 
responsibilities as useful citizens in a free society, and who have 
a sense of obligation to the students who will be leaders of 
tomorrow. 

It invites applicants who are willing to accept the challenge of 
new ideas and those with a commitment to education as the 
means of achieving their own personal development and of help- 
ing to solve the perplexing problems of our increasingly complex 
society. It seeks students who are intellectually equipped to 
participate in a community of scholars and who find satisfaction 
in the life of the mind. 

It believes that all students should know something of the 
physical world and the scientific method by which data are 
gathered, verified and organized; that they should be knowl- 
edgeable about the societal relationships which make up the 
adult world; that they must cultivate the heritage of the past 
and be concerned about their spiritual, moral and physical de- 
velopment; and that as graduates they should be able to com- 
municate effectively in all areas with their fellowmen. 

It produces men and women who have a sense of the dignity 
and worth of the individual, love of freedom, an awareness of 
the continuity and interrelationships of human society, and a 



Honors Program 



sense of responsibility toward others. Its graduates have 
achieved distinction as ministers, teachers, lawyers, physicians, 
businessmen, journalists and in a host of other occupations. 

The 4-1-4 calendar and curriculum are designed to encourage 
intellectual independence. In addition to the normal semester 
load of four courses, the winter term courses are devised by the 
faculty in the areas of their own scholarly interest. These courses 
are graded Pass-Fail, or letter grade only, as the instructor or 
students decide at registration. 

Recognizing the importance of providing students with an 
opportunity to enrich their undergraduate experience through 
study in other cultures, Wake Forest has instituted programs 
in France, India, Italy and Spain. These programs are super- 
vised on a rotating basis by several academic departments and 
therefore vary from time to time. Approximately twenty stu- 
dents each semester study in Venice and in Dijon and pursue 
four courses under the direction of a regular member of the Uni- 
versity Faculty. Wake Forest students participate in the Ex- 
periment for International Living programs. 

Interdisciplinary Studies 

Wake Forest offers the Open Curriculum and an Interdisci- 
plinary Honors program designed for the superior student. The 
Open Curriculum eliminates the basic and divisional require- 
ments, and the student, with the help of an adviser, may devise 
his own curriculum. 

Interdisciplinary honors courses, designed to broaden the 
student's knowledge, overlap several departments and are taught 
by professors from different disciplines. The participants usually 
schedule three interdisciplinary honors seminars and later con- 
centrate on departmental honors work in their major fields. 

Students, however, who are not candidates for departmental 
honors and who have completed four interdisciplinary seminars 
and have met certain other requirements will be graduated with 
"Honors in the Arts and Sciences." 

Departmental Honors Program 

Many departments offer specialized honors programs for high- 
ly qualified majors. Admission to an Honors Program is by ap- 



Creative Arts 



plication to and with the consent of the department. The 
minimum requirement is a grade point average of not less than 
3.0 on all college work and 3.3 on all work in the major. Beyond 
these stipulations, a department may at its discretion impose 
such additional requirements as the completion of specific 
courses, an honors seminar or honors research, an independent 
study project and a comprehensive examination on the special 
project. The specific requirements of each department are listed 
with the course requirements for the major. 

The Graduate School 

The Graduate School offers in the School of Arts and Sciences 
work leading to the Master of Arts degree, the Master of Arts 
in Education, and the Doctor of Philosophy (currently offered 
only in Biology and Chemistry). The Master of Science and the 
Doctor of Philosophy are offered through programs at the Bow- 
man Gray School of Medicine. 

The Professional Schools 

The Juris Doctor degree is awarded by the Wake Forest Uni- 
versity School of Law to those students who successfully com- 
plete the required three-year program. In addition to the M.D. 
degree, the Bowman Gray School of Medicine also offers the 
Ph.D. degree in the fields of Anatomy, Biochemistry, Micro- 
biology, Pharmaecology, Physiology, and Comparative and Ex- 
perimental Pathology. 

The Babcock Graduate School of Management offers programs 
leading to either the Master of Business Administration degree 
or to the Master of Management degree upon successful com- 
pletion of two years of study. 

More detailed information about courses, costs, and plans of 
instruction in these professional schools may be secured by 
writing directly to the school concerned. 

Creative Arts 

The University offers many opportunities for creative ex- 
pression and participation. Writers may contribute to one of the 
three University publications. The Old Gold and Black, the stu- 
dent newspaper published weekly since 1916, has a long tradi- 



Creative Arts 



tion in collegiate journalism. The Student, published since 1882, 
appears four times a year and is the official literary magazine of 
the University. It publishes fiction, poetry, and articles about 
campus life and contemporary living. The Howler, the college 
yearbook, was first published in 1903. 

Debating at Wake Forest is conducted under the auspices of 
the Speech Communications and Theatre Arts Department. 
Emphasis is placed upon giving maximum participation to in- 
terested students. Twenty to thirty students usually receive 
intercollegiate debating experience. Wake Forest debaters con- 
sistently win top awards in major national and regional tourna- 
ments. Wake Forest sponsors two college tournaments, a high 
school debate tournament, and a workshop for high school stu- 
dents during the summer. 

The University Theatre has an active drama program and a 
theatre laboratory where students produce new plays as well as 
innovative interpretations of standard works. The Anthony 
Aston Society and the Wake Forest Chapter of the National 
Collegiate Players, an honorary dramatic fraternity, were formed 
in 1963. 

Musicians may sing in the Chapel Choir, the Touring Choir, 
the Madrigal Singers and the Opera Workshop; play in the Wake 
Forest Little Symphony, Demon Deacon Marching Band, the 
Symphonic Wind Ensemble, the Concert Band, the Basketball 
Varsity Pep Band, the two Jazz Ensembles, the Percussion 
Ensemble, the University Woodwind Quintet, or the Brass 
Quintet. 

The University Artist Series presents a series of outstanding 
concerts to the University community. The five concerts each 
season are chosen so that in the four years a student is at the 
University, he may attend concerts by a balanced range of 
artists. Concerts are presented in Wait Chapel Auditorium, and 
students are admitted without further charge upon presentation 
of the Wake Forest Identification card. Among the recent out- 
standing attractions have been Leontyne Price, Yehudi Menu- 
hin, the Vienna Symphony, the Cleveland Orchestra, Marcel 
Marceau, and Alicia de Larrocha. 



10 



Sports 

Since 1964, the Institute of Literature has promoted the 
cause of humane letters in special lectures which show some- 
thing of the diversity in unity which characterizes the literary 
heritage of the West. The Institute has featured such outstand- 
ing figures as W. H. Auden, Malcolm Cowley, James Dickey, 
V. S. Pritchett, Gilbert Highet, Whitney Oates, Cedric Whitman 
and John Finley. 

The Robinson Lectures, held biennially, have resulted in the 
publication of a number of books, including the well known 
Naming the Whirlwind by Langdon Gilkey. 

The Ecumenical Institute provides an academic setting for 
better understanding and wider experience in religion in a plural- 
istic society. 

The College Union provides a stimulating and challenging 
series of lecturers, musicians, artists and poets. Recent perform- 
ers have included Brooklyn Bridge, Bread, Livingston Taylor, 
The Byrds, Mary Travers; Lecturers John Holt, Tom Muston, 
Bill Russell and a film festival. The Union designates a portion 
of its funds for the purchase of contemporary paintings, sculp- 
ture and graphics. 

Sports 

Recognizing the importance of recreation and fitness activi- 
ties in maintaining the well-being of students, the University 
provides an opportunity for each student to develop his indi- 
vidual interest and competence to the level of proficiency he 
desires. Women participate in twenty sports in two leagues and 
more than one-half of the students take part in these programs. 
Men participate in nineteen different sports in three separate 
leagues: fraternity, house, and independent. 

Varsity sports are vigorous and representative teams partici- 
pate in a full schedule in the following sports: football, basket- 
ball, track and field, cross country, swimming, golf and tennis. 
Varsity teams have always acquitted themselves well, but per- 
haps golf has been the sport which has brought the most 
recognition. 



11 



Location 

Community Affairs 

Wake Forest students have been active in community affairs. 
The Urban Affairs Institute works with students in securing 
off-campus learning experiences during the Winter Term. The 
city provides an internship which enables students to work with 
various branches of the city government. Still other students 
work with boys' clubs, the city's Youth Council, and in kinder- 
gartens as student teachers. 

The students sponsor Challenge, a biennial symposium on 
contemporary American affairs. Now in its ninth year, past 
Challenge programs have considered such areas as "The Emerg- 
ing World of the American Negro," "The Implications of Pros- 
perity," "The Challenge of Survival: not man apart," and have 
brought such speakers as Senator Edmund Muskie, Harvey Cox, 
Michael Harrington, Ralph Nader, Rene Dubos, Daniel Bell, 
and Senator John Tunney. 

Residential Housing 

Accommodations for approximately 2500 men and women are 
provided in the University residence halls. Davis, Taylor, Kit- 
chin, Poteat, Efird, and Huffman dormitories offer attractive 
living quarters for men students on the central quadrangle, 
commonly called the Plaza. Bostwick, Johnson, Babcock and a 
recently constructed and as yet unnamed dormitory located in 
the south area of the campus provide housing for approximately 
800 women. Faculty and student legislation relating to residence 
is provided in full in The Student Handbook. 

Location 

Located in the Piedmont section of North Carolina, the college 
campus proper occupies 320 acres, which are bordered by the 
Reynolda Gardens annex consisting of 148 acres. There are 42 
buildings, including four classroom buildings, several libraries, 
nine dormitories, and twelve apartment buildings for faculty 
and married students. Wake Forest is located in the northeast 
section of Winston-Salem, a city of 135,000 inhabitants. In the 
Salem area of the city the heritage goes back to the arrival of 
the Moravians in 1766, while in the Winston area it is a city of 



12 



Location 

the new South. This combination of cultural heritage and 
modern business and industrial activity makes it a particularly 
attractive place for an educational institution. 

In addition to the variety of cultural activities offered by the 
campus community, there are two art galleries, a nature-science 
center, the restored village of Old Salem, Reynolda House, an 
accredited art museum housed in the former home of the late 
industrialist, R. J. Reynolds, the Museum of Early Southern 
Decorative Arts, the Winston-Salem Symphony, a community 
theatre, and the Piedmont University Center. 




13 



Purposes and Objectives 

As an institution founded by the Baptist State Convention 
of North Carolina, Wake Forest University seeks to shape its 
goals, policies, and practices by Christian ideals. It seeks to 
help its students become mature, well-informed and responsible 
persons. It seeks to introduce its students to the cultural 
heritage of our times, through a broad study of the humanities, 
the natural and social sciences and mathematics, and through 
a concentration in at least one academic discipline. It seeks to 
develop in its students the ability to think honestly and clearly, 
to use the English language correctly, and to use at least one 
foreign language effectively. It seeks to assist its students in 
building a system of values which takes full account of the 
things of the spirit as well as things material that they may 
become constructive and useful members of society. Finally, 
it seeks to aid its students in achieving for themselves a vital 
and relevant faith. 

These purposes underlie the total academic program of the 
University. Through them the University seeks to prepare its 
students for careers in teaching, the ministry, law, medicine, 
business, research, and other professions. 




14 



ADMISSION 




A candidate for admission must furnish evidence of maturity 
and educational achievement. The Committee on Admissions 
will give careful consideration to the applicant's academic rec- 
ords, scores on tests, and evidences of character, motivation, 
goals, and general fitness for college. 

Entrance From Secondary School 

The secondary school program of each candidate must estab- 
lish his commitment to the kind of broad liberal education re- 
flected in the academic requirements of Wake Forest College. 

The minimum requirement for admission to all degrees is 
graduation from an accredited secondary school with a minimum 
of 16 units of credit. It is strongly recommended that these six- 
teen units include 4 units in English, 3 in mathematics, 2 in 
history and social studies, 2 in one foreign language, and 1 in 
natural sciences, and preference will normally be given to a stu- 
dent whose secondary school record includes such a course 
distribution. 

However, a student who presents at least 12 units of such 
college preparatory subjects, but somewhat differently distrib- 
uted, and who otherwise appears to be highly qualified for ad- 
mission to Wake Forest College, will still be considered by the 
Committee on Admissions. 



15 



Application Fee 



A limited number of students may be admitted without the 
high school diploma. Particular emphasis will be placed on the 
applicant's ability, motivation, and maturity. 

Application Procedures 

1. The completed application should be filed at least eight 
months prior to the date on which the applicant hopes to 
enroll at Wake Forest, but not before September 1 of the 
senior year. Except in case of emergency, the final date for 
making application for the fall semester is August 5; for the 
spring semester, January 1. 

2. The secondary school record of the applicant and the recom- 
mendations of the appropriate school officials must be sent 
by an official of the secondary school to the Director of Ad- 
missions of Wake Forest College. 

3. Each applicant must present a score (senior year preferred) 
on the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance 
Examination Board. Information and applications for taking 
the test may be secured from the secondary school or from 
the College Entrance Examination Board, Box 592, Prince- 
ton, New Jersey, 08540 or Box 1025, Berkeley, California, 
94701. Test reports must be sent from the test center; they 
may not be submitted by the applicant. 

Application Fee and Admissions Deposit 

A fee of $15.00 to cover the cost of processing must accom- 
pany the application. The fee will not be applied to later charges 
in the event of acceptance; in the event of failure to be admitted 
or of cancellation of the application, the fee will not be refunded. 
The University reserves the right to reject any application with- 
out explanation. 

When an applicant has received notice of acceptance for ad- 
mission or readmission to Wake Forest College, an admission 
deposit of $100.00 must be sent to the Director of Admissions 
of Wake Forest College not later than three weeks after the 
notice of acceptance is mailed. Make checks payable to Wake 
Forest University. This deposit will be credited toward the ap- 
plicant's college fees. It will be refunded if the application for 

16 



Early Decision 



admission or readmission is cancelled by the applicant and a 
written request for refund is received by the Director of Ad- 
missions of Wake Forest College not later than May 15 for 
the fall semester or November 1 for the spring semester. Re- 
funds will not be made after these dates. Failure to pay the 
deposit within three weeks after the letter of acceptance has 
been mailed will indicate that the applicant does not intend to 
enter Wake Forest College. 

If a student is accepted for admission or readmission after 
May 15 for the fall semester or after November 1 for the spring 
semester, the admission deposit is due within two weeks of the 
date of acceptance. Deposits made after May 15 and November 
1 are not refundable. 

No deposit is required of a student who expects to enroll for 
the summer session only. 

The Early Decision Plan 

This plan is available to well qualified high school students 
who at the close of their junior year have definitely decided that 
their first choice college is Wake Forest. An Early Decision 
Agreement is required with each application. 

The application for early decision can be filed after comple- 
tion of the applicant's junior year but must be completed by 
late October of the senior year. It must include the high school 
record, recommendations, and scores on the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test of the College Entrance Examination Board. Although 
achievement tests are not required, the Committee on Admis- 
sions recommends the applicant submit achievement tests, es- 
pecially the test in English Composition, to supplement the 
application. 

The Committee on Admissions will make decisions on applica- 
tions as they are completed with all applicants being notified no 
later than early November. If an applicant is accepted, the re- 
quired deposit must be paid by January 1. Those not admitted 
by early decision will be asked to submit a senior year Scholastic 
Aptitude Test score and the first semester's grades of their senior 
year, or they will be advised to apply elsewhere. 

17 



Admission 

Advanced Placement 

Wake Forest University recognizes college-level work done 
in high school by giving credit and placement on the basis of 
Advanced Placement Examinations of the College Entrance 
Examination Board and such pertinent supplementary infor- 
mation as may be available. 

Exceptionally qualified applicants for advanced standing may 
receive exemption from some basic courses with credit on the 
authorization of the department concerned. For the purposes 
of computing quality point ratios, etc., credit gained by ad- 
vanced standing examination is treated as credit transferred to 
Wake Forest College from another college. 

Dual Enrollment 

A student who earns credit from an accredited college before 
he or she is admitted to Wake Forest University as a freshman 
may have that credit transferred to Wake Forest, provided that 
a grade average of C or higher has been received and provided 
that the course is approved by the appropriate department. If 
the student receives a grade average of less than C on all work 
taken, the student may petition the Executive Committee on 
the merits of his case. 

Admission To Advanced Standing 

The number of transfer students that can be admitted each 
year depends upon the availability of space in the sophomore 
and junior classes. 

An applicant for admission who has attended another college 
must be a graduate of a standard junior college or must furnish 
a certificate of honorable dismissal stating that the applicant 
is eligible in all respects to enter the college last attended, and 
must have an overall average of at least C on all college work 
attempted. These are minimum requirements for consideration. 
A student who is admitted from another college before fully 
meeting the prescribed admissions requirements for entering 
freshmen must remove the entrance conditions during the first 
year at Wake Forest. 

Courses satisfactorily completed in other accredited colleges 
are accepted under the regulations that have been adopted by 

18 



Graduate Admissions 



the faculty for the approval of such courses. In general, however, 
no credit is allowed for courses not found in the curriculum of 
Wake Forest College. All credits allowed for advanced stand- 
ing are held in suspense until the candidate has spent one term 
in residence. The minimum residence requirement for a bac- 
calaureate degree is two academic years — the senior year and 
one other. 

College Level Examination Program 

Wake Forest College participates in the College Level Ex- 
amination Program of the Educational Testing Service. Under 
this program a student may be able, with the approval of his 
adviser and the department concerned, to obtain a limited 
amount of college credit through the subject examinations of the 
CLEP. Credit will not normally be granted by way of the general 
examinations. Approval will depend on the student's background 
and experience. The pertinent department will evaluate the re- 
sults of any examination and, in cooperation with the Registrar, 
determine the credit to be assigned. Further information is avail- 
able from the office of Admissions or, for students already en- 
rolled, the Dean of the College. 

Summer School 

The University holds a summer session on the campus which 
begins early in June. Approximately 70 courses are offered. The 
normal load is two courses during the eight weeks term; one 
course during each of the four week terms. Certain courses are 
open to qualified high school students and to freshmen who 
plan to matriculate in the fall. Complete information about en- 
trance, procedures, courses, cost and regulations will be found 
in the Summer Session Bulletin published in March of each year. 
Copies may be obtained from the Dean of the Summer Session, 
Box 7293 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, N. C. 27109. 

Graduate Admissions 

Wake Forest University offers graduate work leading to the 
degrees of Master of Arts, Master of Arts in Education, and 
Doctor of Philosophy (currently offered in Biology and Chem- 



19 



Scholarships and Fellowships 



istry) in the School of Arts and Sciences, and Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy in the Bowman Gray School of Medi- 
cine. Disciplines in the School of Arts and Sciences which offer 
graduate programs are: Anthropology, Biology, Chemistry, Edu- 
cation, English, History, Mathematics, Physical Education, 
Physics, Psychology, Religion, Sociology, and Speech Communi- 
cation and Theatre Arts. 

All applicants are required to submit scores on the Aptitude 
Test and the Advanced Test of the Graduate Record Examina- 
tions administered by the Educational Testing Service, Box 955, 
Princeton, N. J. 98540. 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts are required to 
complete successfully a minimum of twenty-four hours of course 
work, write a thesis for which six hours of credit are allotted, 
and pass a reading examination in one foreign language or, in 
some disciplines, substitute a demonstration of competency in a 
special skill such as computer programming or statistics. 

Although the requirements for the Master of Arts degree may 
be fulfilled in some disciplines in one calendar year, candidates 
usually find it profitable to spend three or four semesters of 
study to attain this degree. 

Most graduate-level courses are planned for students who are 
candidates for the various masters' degrees. The departments 
which offer this work present a limited number of graduate 
seminars, advanced experimental work, or special studies de- 
signed for graduate students. These courses carry numbers in 
the four and five hundreds in the departmental listing of the 
"Courses of Study" in this catalog. 

Scholarships and Fellowships 
The Graduate School will have twenty full tuition scholar- 
ships available to be awarded for the summer of 1974 and a total 
of one hundred ten assistantships, fellowships, and scholarships 
for the academic year 1974-1975. These range in value from 
$1900 to $4300. 

The Bulletin of the Graduate School, an application for ad- 
mission form, and an application for grant form may be obtained 
by writing the Dean of the Graduate School, Box 7485 Rey- 
nolda Station, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North 
Carolina 27109. 

20 



UNIVERSITY CHARGES AND FINANCIAL 
ARRANGEMENTS 

Statements in this Bulletin concerning expenses are not to be 
regarded as forming an irrevocable contract between the student 
and the University. The University reserves the right to change 
without notice the cost of instruction at any time within the 
student's term of residence. 

Charges are due in full 10 days prior to registration. Informa- 
tion concerning payment will be sent to all students prior to 
the beginning of each semester. 

Faculty regulations require that a student's University ac- 
count must be settled in full before he is entitled to receive his 
grades, a transcript of his record, a diploma, or to register for 
the succeeding semester. 



Wake Forest College 

Charges for the Regular School Year 

MEN Per Semester Per Year 

Tuition 1 $1,100 $2,200 

Dormitory Room Rental 

(double room each) 2 180 360 



$1,280 



$2,560 



WOMEN Per Semester 

Tuition 1 $1,100 

Dormitory Room Rental 



(double room each) 2 



190 



$1,290 



Per Year 
$2,200 

380 



$2,580 



Deduct admission and reservation deposit from above charges. See 
pages 22 and 23. 



1 Part-time students (those enrolled for fewer than 3 courses) are charged $225.00 per 
course. Part-time students are not entitled to claim the designated scholarships listed on 
page 25, nor are they granted free admission to athletic contests, free receipt of publica- 
tions or infirmary services. 

2 In addition to the double rooms, there are a limited number of single rooms that rent 
for $45.00 more a semester and a limited number of triple rooms for men that rent for 
$40.00 less than a double room. Babcock Dormitory for women and the new dormitory for 
men and women have a room rental range of $400 to $500 per year. Upperclassmen are 
usually assigned to these dormitories. 

21 



Charges 

A cafeteria, soda shop, and table service dining room are 
located in Reynolda Hall. Meals may be purchased individually 
or under an optional board plan. The approximate yearly cost 
individually is $600-$700. 

Books and supplies are available at the College Book Store, 
located on the campus. The approximate yearly cost is $125. 

Laundry is arranged for privately. A laundry operated by a 
Winston-Salem firm has a branch office located on campus. A 
linen rental service is also available with lockers located in the 
men's and women's dormitories. Coin operated washers and 
dryers are located in the dormitories. 

Other College Charges 

Admission Application Fee. Required with each application 
for admission to cover cost of processing. Non-refundable. 
$15.00. 

Admission Deposit. Required of each student entering for 
the first time, or re-entering after a period of non-attendance. 
Must be sent to the Director of Admissions within three weeks 
after acceptance for admission or readmission. The deposit is 
credited to the student's University charges for the semester for 
which he has been accepted for admission. It is refunded if the 
Director of Admissions is notified in writing prior to May 15 for 
the fall semester and November 1 for the spring semester, of 
cancellation of plans to enter. $100.00. 

Applied Music. Required in addition to tuition of students 
enrolling for individual or class study in applied music as de- 
scribed in the offering of the Department of Music. Payable in 
the Treasurer's office. 1 

Dormitory Damages and Repairs. The student is charged for 
damages to his room or university property in accordance with 
Dormitory Rule 4. Appeal may be made to the Board of Dormi- 
tory Damage Appeals. 

Graduation Fee. Required of all students who are candidates 
for degrees. $20.00. 

1 Private lessons: 30 mins. $55/regular term; 50 mins. $90/regular term. 
30 mins. $15/winter term; 50 mins. $24/winter term. 
Practice Room Fees: Organ: 1 hr. $15; 2 hrs. $18. Piano: 1 hr. $7; 2 hrs. $10. 
Instruments: 1 hr. $5; 2 hrs. $7. 

22 



Charges 

Hospital Bed and Board Charge. The student is charged when 
confined to the University Hospital. An additional charge is 
made for special services and expensive drugs. University Hos- 
pital charges range from $20.00 to $30.00 a day. 

Since most insurance companies do not cover admissions to a 
university hospital or infirmary, students are urged to arrange 
for the student insurance which covers these charges. The stu- 
dent insurance premium is usually under $55.00 per year. 

Key Deposit. Required for each key issued to a dormitory 
room. Refunded when key is returned. $5.00. 

Late Registration Fee. Charged to students registering after 
the dates set by the faculty. $10.00. 

Library Fines. Charges for lost books and for violation of 
other Library regulations. Payable in the Library. 

Reservation Deposit. Students enrolled in the spring semester 
who expect to return for the next regular session beginning in 
September are required to pay a reservation deposit at a date 
set by the Treasurer. It is credited to the student's University 
charges and will be refunded under the same conditions specified 
for the admission deposit, except that refunds will be made if 
requested prior to June 15. $100.00. 

Room Change Fees. $5.00 is charged for authorized room 
changes made after October 1 in the fall semester, after Feb- 
ruary 15 in the spring semester. The fine is $20.00 for any un- 
authorized change. 

Special Examination. Required for each special examination 
taken to remove a course condition. $2.50. 

Student Apartment Rental. Paid monthly at $70.00 per 
month. 

Traffic Fines. Assessed against students violating parking 
regulations, copies of which are obtainable from the Traffic Office. 
May be appealed to the Board of Traffic Appeals. Vehicle 
Registration $20.00. Illegal parking $2.00 each violation. 

Trailer Park Rental. Paid each semester at the rate of $10.00 
per month. 

23 



Withdrawal 



Transcripts. Copies of a student's record are issued for him. 
First copy free, additional copies $1.00 each. 

Summer Session 

A bulletin of the Summer Session is published in March of 
each year and may be obtained by writing the Dean of the 
Summer Session, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, N. C. 
27109. 

Management, Law, Medicine and Graduate Schools 

Bulletins for these schools should be consulted for informa- 
tion as to expenses. Requests for the bulletins should be ad- 
dressed to the appropriate Dean, Wake Forest University, Win- 
ston-Salem, N. C. 

Withdrawal 

Students withdrawing must follow the procedure set forth 
on page 89 and must present their identification cards to the 
Treasurer before any claim for refund may be considered. No 
refund of dormitory room rent is made. Refund of tuition and 
activity fee is made according to the following table: 





Percentage of Total Tuition 


Number of Weeks 


and Activity Fee 


Attendance* 


to be Refunded 


1 


Total tuition less $100 


2 


75% 


3 


50% 


4 


25% 



♦Counting from the first day of registration; fractions of a week to count as a full week. 

24 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS 

Wake Forest is committed to the ideal that any students ad- 
mitted to the University who genuinely need financial aid will 
receive such financial assistance as they shall require in order to 
attend Wake Forest. 

By regulation of the Board of Trustees, all financial aid must 
be approved by the Committee on Scholarships and Student 
Aid of Wake Forest College (Division of Arts and Sciences). 
The Committee requires that applications for financial aid be 
made on forms obtainable by addressing the Committee at 
Box 7305, Winston-Salem, N. C. 27109. 

Scholarships supported by funds of the College are not 
granted to students enrolled in the graduate and professional 
schools of the University. 

To receive consideration for financial aid, the applicant must 
either be a registered, full-time student in Wake Forest College 
or must have been accepted for admission. 

Need is a factor in the award of virtually all financial aid, 
with the exception of the $1,000 honorary Carswell awards. 
Each applicant must file a financial statement as part of his 
application for financial aid. 

The Committee reserves the right to revoke financial aid for 
unsatisfactory academic achievement; for violation of University 
regulations; or for violation of local, state, or federal laws. 

No financial aid is automatically renewable. Application must 
be made each year. 

Applicants should submit applications sufficiently early so 
that final action will have been taken before the beginning of 
the school year. 

Alcoa Foundation Scholarship. Donated by the Alcoa Foun- 
dation, this scholarship is available to a freshman from the 
Piedmont area who is majoring in Chemistry and will be awarded 
on the basis of need. The value of this scholarship is $2000.00. 

The Alpha Phi Omega Scholarship. Established by the Kappa 
Theta Chapter of Alpha Phi Omega, National Service Fratern- 
ity, this scholarship is available to a male freshman student 
who presents evidence of need and an excellent high school 
record. A minimum of $200.00 is available. 

25 



Scholarships 



Eliza Pratt Brown Scholarship. Donated by the late Junius 
Calvin Brown of Madison, North Carolina, in honor of his wife, 
Eliza Pratt Brown, the fund is used to assist needy, worthy, and 
deserving students from North Carolina, with preference being 
given to students from the town of Madison and Rockingham 
County. The maximum value is $2,000. 

Burlington Industries Scholarship. Donated by Burlington 
Industries Foundation, this scholarship is available to one 
who has junior standing, has done all previous work at Wake 
Forest and has an average of 3.0 or better. Leadership, scholar- 
ship, and need are considered in making the award. The value 
of the scholarship is $1,000.00, with half of this amount avail- 
able in each of the junior and senior years. 

The J. G. Carroll Memorial Athletic Scholarship. A fund 
donated in memory of Professor J. G. Carroll, former Associate 
Professor of Mathematics. The award is made to some deserving 
athlete who is not on a regular athletic scholarship. The value 
of this scholarship is approximately $100. 

Guy T. Carswell Scholarships. This scholarship program was 
made possible by and established in honor of the late Guy T. 
Carswell and his wife, Mrs. Clara Carswell of Charlotte, North 
Carolina. The scholarships carry an annual value ranging from 
a minimum stipend of $1,000 to a maximum stipend of $3,700. 
Awards for more than $1,000 are determined on the basis of 
need. A Carswell scholar may be any student applying to Wake 
Forest College who possesses outstanding qualities of intel- 
lect and leadership. Up to thirty scholars are selected by the 
Committee annually. 

James Lee Carver Scholarship. Donated by Mrs. Jean Free- 
man Carver, together with her son, James Lee Carver, II, and 
daughter, Elizabeth Jeanine Carver, in memory of her husband, 
James Lee Carver. This fund is for the purpose of providing 
scholarships to deserving and promising students of the Uni- 
versity who demonstrate a need for financial assistance. Pref- 
erence shall always be given to students who come to Wake 
Forest University from Oxford Orphanage. Value of this scholar- 
ship is approximately $300. 

College Scholarships. These scholarships, in the amounts of 
$100 to $2,200 each, are available to freshmen and upperclass- 

26 



Scholarships 



men presenting satisfactory academic records and evidence of 
need. 

0. B. Crowell Memorial Scholarship Fund. Donated by Mrs. 
Louise T. Crowell of Henderson ville, North Carolina in memory 
of her husband, 0. B. Crowell. This scholarship is awarded 
annually on the basis of character, need, and promise. The value 
of this scholarship is approximately $600. 

Ernst & Ernst Scholarship. Ernst & Ernst, Certified Public 
Accountants, present to an outstanding accounting major an 
Accounting Achievement Award. The award is in the amount of 
$500. The recipient for this award will be designated by the ac- 
counting faculty. 

The Lecausey P. and Lula H. Freeman Scholarship. Donated 
by Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Singleton, Raleigh, North Carolina, in 
memory of the parents of Mrs. Singleton. One scholarship is 
available to a student who may be a freshman, sophomore, or 
junior, and whose home is within the West Chowan Baptist 
Association of North Carolina with preference to Bertie County 
students, on the basis of need and ability. If no qualified appli- 
cant appears from the West Chowan Association, then residents 
of the Roanoke Association may be considered. The scholarship 
is renewable on the basis of need and ability for all school years 
except the senior year. The value of this scholarship is approxi- 
mately $200. 

James W. Gill Scholarship. Donated by Mrs. Ruth R. Gill in 
memory of her husband, James W. Gill, the fund provides a 
scholarship for a deserving student, with preference to students 
from Montgomery and Prince George's Counties, Maryland. 
The value of this scholarship is approximately $600. 

The Wallace Barger Goebel Scholarship. This scholarship is 
made possible through a donation from Mrs. Miriam M. Goebel. 
One scholarship shall be awarded during each school year and 
shall be based upon both ability and financial need. It is the de- 
sire of the donor that first preference for the award be given to 
a student with an interest in literature, second preference to a 
student with an interest in history, and third preference to a 
student enrolled in the pre-medical program of the College. 
The value of this scholarship is approximately $400. 

27 



Scholarships 

Fuller Hamrick Scholarship. Created under the will of the 
late Everett C. Snyder of Wake Forest, North Carolina, in 
memory of Fuller Hamrick. The income from this fund is used 
to educate boys and girls from The Mills Home in Thomasville, 
North Carolina. Value of this scholarship is approximately $500. 

George Foster Hankins Scholarships — Freshmen. These 
scholarships were made possible by the late Colonel George 
Foster Hankins of Lexington, N. C. Applicants must be residents 
of North Carolina or children of Wake Forest alumni residing 
in other states. Preference will be given to residents of Davidson 
County, North Carolina. Only high school seniors are eligible 
to compete and must request the necessary application forms 
before December 1 of their senior year. The value of these 
scholarships will range up to $3,400. 

George Foster Hankins Scholarships — Upperclassmen. Up- 
perclassmen are eligible for Hankins Scholarships. However, 
they must have been enrolled in Wake Forest College for at 
least one semester before they may apply as upperclassmen. 
Applications must be on file with the Scholarships Committee 
no later than May 1 of each year for the following school year, 
and preference will be given to applicants from Davidson 
County, North Carolina. The amount of the award will vary 
according to the student's need as determined from the financial 
statement required to be submitted with his application. 

Frank P. Hobgood Scholarship. This scholarship, donated by 
Mrs. Kate H. Hobgood of Reidsville, North Carolina, in memory 
of her husband, is available to those who qualify on "the basis 
of character, purpose, intelligence, and need, with preference 
being given to those who plan to enter the ministry, do religious 
work, become teachers, or become lawyers, the preference being 
in the order named." Applicants must be legal residents of the 
city of Reidsville or live within 10 miles of that city and must 
be recommended by the deacons of the First Baptist Church of 
Reidsville. The value of this scholarship is $500. 

Junior College Scholarships. One scholarship is available each 
year to a graduate of each of the junior colleges of the North 
Carolina Baptist State Convention, in the amount of $150. 
The recipient must rank in the upper one-fourth of the junior 

28 



Scholarships 

college graduating class. Awarded only on the recommendation 
of the president of the junior college. 

Thurman D. Kitchin Scholarship. Donated by the Interfra- 
ternity Council in memory of the late Thurman D. Kitchin, 
President of Wake Forest College from 1930 to 1950, it is avail- 
able to a male freshman student presenting a high school record 
of superior grade and evidence of need. The value of this scholar- 
ship is approximately $300. 

Marie Dayton McDonald Scholarship. Donated by Dr. Thane 
McDonald and friends in memory of his wife. The income from 
this fund is available to a deserving and qualified music student. 
The value is approximately $125 per year. 

Norfleet Scholarship. Donated by Mr. and Mrs. Eustace 
Norfleet of Wilmington, North Carolina, in memory of his 
parents, John A. and Mary Pope Norfleet, five scholarships are 
available in the amount of $200 each to "deserving and prom- 
ising students desiring to attend Wake Forest College and need- 
ing financial assistance." 

North Carolina Scholarships. These scholarships are made 
available by the North Carolina General Assembly and are 
awarded on the basis of financial need to full-time students who 
are bona fide residents of North Carolina. 

Benjamin Wingate Parham Scholarship. This fund was 
donated by Mrs. Kate J. Parham of Oxford, North Carolina, in 
memory of her husband. One full scholarship shall be awarded 
in each school year on the basis of both ability and need. It 
may be renewed for succeeding years. 

Thomas F. Pettus Scholarships. Administered by the North 
Carolina Baptist Foundation, Inc., under the terms of the will 
of the late Thomas F. Pettus of Wilson County, North Carolina, 
this fund makes two or more scholarships available each year in 
memory of Mr. Pettus. These scholarships are to be awarded 
by the college on the basis of merit and need with preference 
to North Carolina Baptist students. 

William Louis Poteat Scholarships. Five scholarships will be 
awarded annually to the graduates of the Baptist junior colleges 
in North Carolina. Each scholarship will range up to $500 

29 



Scholarships 

depending on need as determined from a financial statement 
submitted by each applicant with the application. It may be 
renewed for the senior year. 

Oliver D. and Caroline E. Revell Memorial Scholarship Fund. 
Created under the will of the late Oliver D. Revell of Buncombe 
County, North Carolina, this fund makes available $100 per 
year to one person preparing for the ministry or full-time 
religious work. 

Kate B. Reynolds Memorial Scholarships. Donated in memory 
of the late Mrs. Kate B. Reynolds. Applicants must be residents 
of Forsyth County, North Carolina, who without financial aid 
would be unable to obtain education beyond high school. Pref- 
erence will be given to men. Four scholarships of $1,400 each are 
awarded. 

A. M. Pullen and Company Scholarship. The A. M. Pullen 
and Company, Certified Public Accountants, grants to an out- 
standing upper division accounting major an annual tuition 
scholarship of $600. The recipient, to be designated by the ac- 
counting faculty, is selected on the basis of merit, financial need, 
and interest in public accounting. 

ROTC Scholarships. One, two, three and four-year ROTC 
scholarships are available to students who are motivated toward 
the Army. Applications for four-year scholarships are submitted 
by high school seniors in the late fall to the Commanding 
General of their respective Army area. ROTC freshmen, sopho- 
mores, and juniors at the University apply to the Professor of 
Military Science for one, two and three-year scholarships. Each 
scholarship recipient commits himself by contract to a special 
military obligation and receives full tuition, fees, books and 
classroom materials for the regular school year, and a subsistence 
allowance of $100 per month for the period that the scholarship 
is in effect. Once awarded, scholarships remain in effect through- 
out the contract period subject to satisfactory academic and 
ROTC performance. 

The J. W. Straughan Scholarship. Donated by Misses Mattie, 
Mable and Alice Straughan in memory of their brother, Dr. 
J. W. Straughan of Warsaw, North Carolina. Preference is to be 
given to students from Duplin County, N. C. who are interested 

30 



Scholarships 



in pursuing a medical career, especially in the field of family 
practice. Though need is not an absolute criterion, strongest 
consideration will be given to those who need financial assistance 
to continue their education. 

The Saddye Stephenson and Benjamin Louis Sykes Scholar- 
ship. Donated by Dr. Charles L. Sykes and Dr. Ralph J. Sykes 
in memory of their father and mother. One scholarship is 
awarded each year on the basis of Christian character, academic 
proficiency, and financial need. Preference is given to freshmen 
from the State of North Carolina. It may be renewable each 
year. The value of this scholarship is approximately $400. 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants. These scholar- 
ships are available to a limited number of undergraduate stu- 
dents with exceptional financial need who require these grants to 
attend college. To be eligible, the student must also show 
academic or creative promise. Grants will range from $200 to 
$1500 a year, and can be no more than one-half of the total 
assistance given the student. The amount of financial assistance 
a student may receive depends upon his need — taking into ac- 
count his financial resources, those of his parents, and the cost 
of attending the college of his choice. 

Western Electric Scholarship. Donated by the Western Elec- 
tric Fund, this scholarship is awarded to an undergraduate 
on the basis of leadership, scholastic attainment, and financial 
need. Value, up to $1,500. 

Jesse A. Williams Scholarships. Created under the will of the 
late Jesse A. Williams of Union County, North Carolina, this 
fund provides scholarships in amounts of up to $1,200 per year. 
Preference will be given to deserving students of Union County. 

Charles Littell Wilson Scholarship. Created under the will of 
Mrs. Jennie Mayes Wilson in memory of her husband, the late 
Charles Littell Wilson, this fund makes available one freshman 
scholarship each year ranging from $200 to $600. 

William Luther Wyatt, HI, Scholarship Trust. This fund 
was donated by Mr. and Mrs. William L. Wyatt, Jr., of Raleigh, 
North Carolina, in memory of their late son, William Luther 
Wyatt, III. The purpose of this fund is to award one or more 
scholarships in each school year to a student, preferably to a 

31 



Loan Funds 



male student entering the junior year, who has shown an 
interest and an ability in the field of biology. The award shall 
be based on both the need and the ability of the student. The 
value of this scholarship is approximately $500. 

University Scholarships for North Carolinians. The Trustees 
have established a scholarship fund from which awards are made 
on the basis of need to full-time students who are bona fide 
North Carolina residents. This fund is designed primarily for 
those students whose need is between $100-$200 per year. An 
abbreviated application is required rather than the Parents' 
Confidential Statement of the College Scholarship Service. 

Designated Scholarships for: 

Ministerial Students. Granted on the following conditions: 
(1) Written recommendation or license to preach authorized 
by the applicant's own church body and (2) signature by the 
applicant of an agreement to pay the amount of the scholarship, 
with interest, in the event that he does not serve five years 
in the pastoral ministry within twelve years from the last date 
of attendance at Wake Forest, subject to cancellation in the 
event of death. Value, up to $300. 

Children of Ministers. Awards to those whose fathers make 
their living chiefly by the ministry. Value, up to $150. 

Rehabilitation Students. Awarded to handicapped students 
who have (1) secured the necessary letter of approval from the 
North Carolina Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Raleigh, 
and (2) filed application for the scholarship. Value, up to 

$300. 

Loan Funds 

Students' Wives. Awarded to wives of students in Wake 
Forest University for not more than four school years or the 
equivalent. Becomes void if the husband ceases to be enrolled. 
Value, up to $150. 

James E. and Mary Z. Bryan Foundation Student Loan Plan. 
Legal residents of North Carolina enrolled full time in under- 
graduate programs may borrow up to $750 per semester or $500 
per quarter for a total of $1,500 per school year for an aggregate 

32 



Loan Funds 



of $6,000 through College Foundation, Inc. The interest rate is 
1 percent during the in-school and grace periods and 6 percent 
during the repayment period. Apply through the institution's 
financial aid office. 

Bushnell Baptist Church Loan Fund. Established in 1945 
with funds supplied by the Bushnell Baptist Church of Fontana 
Dam, North Carolina, for needy students. 

Council Fund. Established in 1935 by Mr. C. T. Council of 
Durham, North Carolina, for the aid of senior students. 

James W. Denmark Loan Fund. This fund was originated 
by the late James William Denmark of Dudley, North Carolina, 
in 1875, and available to qualified students after at least one 
semester's work in the University. Preference is given to stu- 
dents from North Carolina. The amount available does not 
exceed $1,000 each year and $3,000 during the entire period of 
enrollment. 

Olivia Dunn Student Loan Fund. Established under the will 
of Miss Birdie Dunn of Wake County, North Carolina, in 
memory of her mother, to be used as a loan fund for worthy 
students. 

Duplin County Loan Fund. This loan fund was donated in 
1942 by friends of the College who wish to remain anonymous 
and is limited to students from Duplin County, North Carolina. 

Elliott B. Earnshaw Loan Fund. Established by the Board 
of Trustees of Wake Forest College as a memorial to the late 
E. B. Earnshaw, Bursar of Wake Forest College. 

Friendly Student Loan Fund. This fund was established in 
1948 by Miss Nell E. Stinson of Raleigh, North Carolina, in 
memory of her sister, Mary Belle Stinson Michael, for the 
benefit of worthy students who need financial aid. 

Grover Carroll Loan Fund. Donated by Lt. Col. and Mrs. 
Robert C. Wells in memory of the late James Grover Carroll, 
Associate Professor of Mathematics at Wake Forest College, 
the sum of $1,000 is available, the principal and interest of 
which may be loaned at 4% interest to worthy students who 
would otherwise be unable to finance completely a college 
education. 

33 



Loan Funds 



George Foster Hankins Loan Fund. Established under the 
will of the late Colonel George Foster Hankins of Lexington, 
North Carolina, with preference to be given to applicants from 
Davidson County, North Carolina. 

Harris Memorial Loan Fund. Established by the late J. P. 
Harris of Bethel, North Carolina, in memory of his first wife, 
Lucy Shearon Harris, and his second wife, Lucy Jones Harris, 
for students who have demonstrated ability to apply educa- 
tional advantages to the rendition of enriched and greater 
Christian service in life and whose circumstances require 
financial assistance in order to prevent disruption in their edu- 
cational program. 

Thomas M. Hunter, Jr., Memorial Scholarship. Established 
in 1948 by Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Hunter of Fayetteville, 
North Carolina, as a loan scholarship in memory of their son. 
The loan scholarship is available for students enrolled in the 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine who are preparing to become 
medical missionaries. 

Edna Tyner Langston Fund. This fund, established in 1942 
by Dr. Henry J. Langston of Danville, Virginia, in memory 
of his wife, is available to a student agreed upon by the donor 
and the college. 

The National Direct Student Loan Program. This fund, 
created under the National Defense Education Act of 1958, 
makes available loans up to $2,500 per year for students in need 
of financial assistance. 

N. C. Insured Student Loan Program. Legal residents of North 
Carolina enrolled full time may borrow up to $750 per semester 
or $500 per quarter for a total of $1,500 per academic year for 
an aggregate of $7,500 through College Foundation, Inc. Loans 
are insured by the State Education Assistance Authority and 
under certain conditions, the U. S. Office of Education pays the 
7 percent interest during the in-school and grace periods. Apply 
through the institution's financial aid office. 

Watts Norton Loan Fund. Established in 1949 by Mr. 
L. Watts Norton of Durham, North Carolina. For the benefit 
of worthy young people enrolled in the Department of Religion 
who need financial assistance. 

34 



Ministerial Aid Fund 



The Powers Fund. This fund was endowed by Dr. Frank P. 
Powers of Raleigh, North Carolina, in 1944 as a memorial to 
his parents, Frank P. and Effie Reade Powers, and is for the 
benefit of needy students, with preference given to orphans. 

Grover and Addy Raby Loan Fund. Established in 1945 by 
Dr. J. G. Raby of Tarboro, North Carolina, in memory of his 
parents. Preference is given to applicants from the First Baptist 
Church of Tarboro. 

James F. Slate Loan Fund. Established in 1908 by the late 
J. F. Slate of Stokes County, North Carolina, and is available 
for ministerial students who have been licensed to preach. 

College Work-Study Program 
On Campus/ Off Campus (PACE) 

Students who show evidence of financial need may qualify for 
financial assistance through the College Work-Study Program. 
Summer employment is available for some students who show 
evidence of need and who are unable to secure adequate em- 
ployment on their own. Participants may work for any public 
and private, non-profit, institution. They will be permitted to 
work up to twelve weeks, forty hours per week, and will be paid 
an hourly wage. Because the program was designed to allow a 
student to contribute to his college expenses, he will be expected 
to save approximately 80% of his earnings for college expenses 
during the following year. A student who is interested in par- 
ticipating in this program should indicate this desire for con- 
sideration to the Financial Aid Office no later than March 15. 

Ministerial Aid Fund 

The Ministerial Aid Fund was established in 1897 through a 
bequest from the estate of the late J. A. Melke and has been 
added to from time to time. 

Funds are available to ministerial students on either a loan 
or a grant basis. Written application must be made to the 
Committee on Scholarships and Student Aid on a form obtain- 
able from that committee. Awards are made on the basis of 
merit and need and, particularly in the case of grants, academic 
achievement. Five annual grants in the amount of $200 each 
are regularly available, in addition to such others as the 
Committee may award. 

35 



Church Grants 



German Exchange Scholarship 

In 1959 a student exchange program was established between 
Wake Forest and the Free University of Berlin. At present 
one scholarship is available to an eligible Wake Forest Univer- 
sity student. It provides (1) 500 German marks a month 
for ten months at the Free University of Berlin; (2) remission 
of all registration and insurance fees; (3) 200 German marks 
a semester for the purchase of books; (4) free accommodation 
in the Studentendorf (student village) comprising a single 
room, use of kitchen, bath, electric light and linen, or a monthly 
living allowance of up to 150 marks. Candidates must have had 
at least two years of German at the college level or equivalent 
and must have acquired junior standing by the end of the 
semester in which they apply. Candidates may major in any 
of the fields offered at Wake Forest University with the per- 
mission of the chairman of the department in question. 

Spanish Exchange Scholarship 

In 1964 a student exchange program was established between 
Wake Forest University and the University of the Andes, at 
Bogota, Colombia. At present the scholarships available to 
eligible Wake Forest students are: two scholarships of one 
semester's study each; or, one scholarship of two consecutive 
semesters. It is left to the discretion of Wake Forest University 
whether one or two students are selected annually to study 
during any given academic year at the University of the Andes. 
The scholarships provide: (1) remission of tuition and fees; 
(2) board and lodging; (3) textbooks. Candidates must have 
had at least two years of Spanish at the college level or the 
equivalent. Candidates may pursue studies in any of the fields 
offered at Wake Forest University with the permission of the 
department in question. 

Church Choir Work Grants 

Work grants are given by Wake Forest University and Wake 
Forest Baptist Church to encourage outstanding music students. 
They are awarded on the basis of talent, reliability, and interest 
in the Church. The selection of recipients is made upon the joint 



36 



Veterans 

recommendation of the Music Committee of the Church and the 
Department of Music of the University. There are 15 awards 
valued at $300.00 each. 

Student/Student Wife Employment 

The Personnel Office assists students to locate either on- or 
off-campus, part-time employment. A maximum of 20 hours 
work per week is suggested for full-time students. Information 
about part-time employment, as well as summer jobs, may be 
obtained in Room 120, Reynolda Hall. Wives of University 
students may be referred by the Personnel Office to on-campus 
jobs or employment opportunities in the community. 

Veterans 

Applicants who need information concerning educational 
benefits for veterans and children of veterans should consult 
the nearest regional office of the Veterans Administration. This 
office for North Carolina is located in the Wachovia Building, 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 



fcal 




37 



c MjU 'uk?&£ 




Sep. tsjs 

J-P J&OcAe-ry Put 

7f 'Vr C As /</•+* 'Ttc 



These signatures appear on the lead plate which was placed 
in the cornerstone of the original Wait Hall when it was built in 
1835. The plate was found in the ashes following the destruction 
of Wait Hall by fire in May, 1933. 

38 



HISTORY 

The history of Wake Forest University divides naturally into 
three main periods: (1) from the beginning of the institution in 
the early 1830's to the early 1860's, when the Civil War forced 
its temporary closing; (2) from 1865 to the early 1950's, when 
the movement of the college campus from Wake Forest, North 
Carolina, to Winston-Salem, North Carolina, was organized and 
carried out; and (3) from 1956, when the school began opera- 
tion in Winston-Salem, to the present. The institution has seen 
difficult times and gone through hard struggles; but in each of 
the three periods the movement toward greater diversity and 
excellence of academic life was and continues to be steadily 
maintained. Now, as throughout its history, the guiding pur- 
pose of the University is to be found in the simple motto on the 
University seal: Pro Humanitate. 

Beginnings to the Early 1860's 

The founding of Wake Forest College in 1834 was one mani- 
festation of the intellectual and humanitarian reform movement 
which characterized North Carolina and the nation in the 
decade of the 1830's. The beginnings of the College and the 
formation of the Baptist State Convention were closely inter- 
woven. A leading motive for the organization of the Convention 
in 1830 was that it might serve as an agency for establishing an 
institution that would provide education under Christian influ- 
ences for ministers and laymen. 

The leaders in the movement for Convention and College 
were Baptist ministers and laymen from diverse backgrounds. 
Martin Ross, a North Carolinian, long had been a prominent 
Baptist minister in the Chowan area and an advocate of an 
educated ministry; Thomas Meredith, a graduate of the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, had been pastor first at New Bern and 
after 1825 at Edenton; and Samuel Wait, a graduate of Colum- 
bia College, New York, had been pastor of the New Bern 
Baptist Church since 1827. The inspiration of Ross, the schol- 
arship of Meredith, who wrote the Convention Constitution 
and later founded and edited the Biblical Recorder, and the 
leadership of Wait combined to lead the Baptists of the State 

39 



History 

into the formation of the Baptist State Convention on March 
26, 1830. Fourteen men, seven ministers and seven laymen, at- 
appointed Wait as its agent to explain to churches, associations, 
and individuals the need for a college to provide "an education 
in the liberal arts in fields requisite for gentlemen." 

For nearly three years Wait traveled over the state in his 
wagon, his wife and young daughter accompanying him. He 
visited churches and associations and the homes of individual 
Baptists, speaking to a large number of the approximately 15,000 
Baptists who lived in the Piedmont and Coastal counties of the 
State. Perhaps as many as one-half of the Baptists opposed 
missions, education, and other benevolences, but after two 
years of educational canvassing Wait reported sufficient senti- 
ment in favor of the program for the Convention to proceed. 

A 600 acre plantation, located sixteen miles north of Raleigh, 
was purchased from Dr. Calvin Jones for $2,000 in 1832. The 
Legislature was asked to grant a charter for a literary institution 
based on the manual labor principle. The lobbying of opponents, 
both Baptist and non-Baptist was effective in the Legislature 
and only the tie-breaking vote of William D. Moseley, Speaker 
of the Senate, secured passage of the charter-granting bill. It 
was a meager charter, subject to various restrictions and limited 
to a period of 20 years, but the birth of Wake Forest had been 
achieved. Its subsequent growth would be the result of creative 
adjustments and successful responses to a series of other chal- 
lenges. 

After his successful three-year canvass of the State, it is not 
surprising that Samuel Wait was elected principal of the new 
institution. Sixteen students registered February 3, 1834, and 
before the end of the year seventy-two had enrolled. The Bap- 
tists, who had regarded the manual labor principle as a partial 
means of financing the institution, abandoned the idea after five 
years, and the school was rechartered in 1839 as Wake Forest 
College. 

President Wait's home was the farmhouse on the Jones plan- 
tation which is now preserved as an historical museum in the 
town of Wake Forest. Students lived in what had been slave 
quarters and classes were conducted in the carriage house. In 
1835 construction on the first brick building was begun by 

40 



History 

Captain John Berry, a prominent builder of that period, who 
agreed to accept payment in notes, due in three annual install- 
ments. Because of the financial panic of 1837, the final payment 
was not made until 1850. The economic crisis had such an ad- 
verse effect that financial support of the College and student 
enrollment steadily declined; only a loan of $10,000 from the 
State Literary Fund in 1841 prevented bankruptcy. During 
these years of arduous struggle to keep the College alive, Presi- 
dent Wait exhausted his physical strength and contracted an 
illness which compelled him to resign the presidency in 1845. 

Dr. William Hooper succeeded President Wait and the pros- 
pects of the College became brighter. Hooper, a grandson of 
William Hooper, one of North Carolina's three signers of the 
Declaration of Independence, had received his education at the 
University of North Carolina. As a native North Carolinian and 
with family connection extending over several generations, he 
was able to mobilize public opinion in support of the College. 
His leadership during his brief tenure generated such enthu- 
siasm in support of education that a successful campaign for 
funds retired the debt for the College buildings in 1850. 

After Hooper's resignation, the Trustees elected to the presi- 
dency Professor John B. White of the Mathematics Depart- 
ment, a graduate of Brown University. Since the physical facili- 
ties were now free of mortgages, fund-raising efforts during 
President White's administration could be concentrated on in- 
creasing the endowment. A campaign begun in 1852 had as its 
goal increasing the endowment by $50,000. The Trustees placed 
in charge of this campaign Washington Manly Wingate, a 
graduate of the Class of 1849; and with the vigor of youth and 
a devotion to his alma mater almost unparalleled, he raised 
within a year and a half approximately $33,000. 

President White was an able man, but the temper of the times 
was unsuited to leadership by a Northerner. President White 
resigned in 1854, and the Trustees chose as his successor Wash- 
ington Manly Wingate, then twenty-six years old and the first 
alumnus to serve as President. Under his vigorous leadership 
which spanned nearly three tumultuous decades, the quality of 
students improved, and new faculty members were added. The 
preparatory department was discontinued in 1860. During the 

41 



History 

first eight years of Wingate's administration, sixty-six students 
graduated, more than half of the total graduated during the 
first twenty-three years of the existence of the College. In 1857 
President Wingate launched a campaign to raise an additional 
endowment of $50,000. Over one-half of the amount was raised 
in a single evening during the 1857 meeting of the Convention. 
This period of growth and expansion was cut short by the 
division of the Union into two separate countries in 1861. The 
Conscription Act of 1863 did not exempt students, and for three 
years during the Civil War, the College suspended operations. 
The buildings were used briefly for a girls' school, but after 1863 
the Confederate Government used the facilities as a military 
hospital. 

Post-War Re-Birth 

Following Sherman's march through the South and Lee's sur- 
render at Appomatox, a peace of desolation pervaded the South. 
Supporters of Wake Forest surveyed what remained after the 
cessation of hostilities: college buildings, now leaky and in a 
poor state of repair, approximately $11,700 from its pre-war 
endowment of $100,000, its former President and faculty, and a 
loyal group of Trustees. There was also something else — an 
indomitable spirit of determination that Wake Forest College 
should emerge from the wreck of war and fulfill its mission. 

The needs of the College were great and the financial pros- 
pects poor, yet in November, 1865, barely six months after the 
end of the war, nine members of the Board of Trustees acting 
with unwarranted courage authorized the resumption of classes 
at the College. Dr. Wingate was persuaded to resume the Presi- 
dency, and on January 15, 1866, fifty-one students enrolled. 
The enrollment gradually increased as the region and the econ- 
omy slowly recovered during the Reconstruction Era. 

President Wingate realized that the people of North Carolina 
must be awakened to the great need for education in the New 
South and that they must be persuaded that Wake Forest Col- 
lege could effectively serve their needs. To launch this educa- 
tional campaign, a Baptist sponsored state-wide educational 
convention was held in Raleigh, but before funds could be col- 
lected, the financial crisis of 1873 ended all immediate hope for 
endowment. 



42 



History 

The failure of the 1873-74 fund-raising campaign placed the 
College in a precarious position. The triple encumbrances of 
war, reconstruction, and the financial panic of 1873 made it evi- 
dent that little money could be raised in North Carolina. The 
Committee on Endowment of the Board of Trustees appointed 
James S. Purefoy, a local merchant and Baptist minister, agent 
to solicit funds in the Northern states for continued operation 
of the College. While serving as Treasurer of the Board before 
the war, he had salvaged $11,700 from the pre-war endowment 
of $100,000 by persuading the Trustees to invest half of the en- 
dowment in state bonds. He was now asked, at the age of sixty- 
one, to undertake still another mission for the College. After two 
years of unrelenting and often discouraging labor, without re- 
muneration, he placed in the hands of the Trustees the sum of 
$9,200. 

It was also in these bleak days of financial uncertainty that a 
Wake Forest student, James W. Denmark, proposed and founded 
the first college student loan fund in the United States. Den- 
mark, a Confederate veteran, had worked six years to accumu- 
late enough money for his college expenses. Soon after entering 
Wake Forest in 1871, he realized that many students had the 
same great financial need. From his meager funds, he spent five 
dollars for post cards and wrote to the college presidents across 
the country asking how their loan funds were organized. He 
found, surprisingly, that the colleges had no loan funds. He en- 
listed the support of faculty and students at Wake Forest and 
in 1877 persuaded the Legislature to charter the North Carolina 
Baptist Student Loan Fund. Chartered with a capital of $25,000, 
it was actually begun with a paid-in capital of $150. Now known 
as the James W. Denmark Loan Fund, and the oldest college 
student loan fund in the United States, it has assets of $325,000 
and continues to serve the needs of students according to the 
purposes of its founder. 

At the close of President Wingate's second administration in 
1879, the College had been successfully revived; the endowment 
had been increased from approximately $11,000 to $40,000; a 
new library building had been constructed, and another building, 
Wingate Hall, was under construction. Perhaps the greatest 
service President Wingate rendered was bringing to the College 
with unerring good judgment, a faculty composed of men who 

43 



History 

were highly qualified as scholars and who served the College 
with ability, distinction, and dedication over a long period of 
years. Among these were Professors William G. Simmons, 1855- 
88; William Royall, 1859-70, 1880-92; William Bailey Royall, 
1866-1928; Luther Rice Mills, 1867-1907; and Charles Elisha 
Taylor, 1870-1915, who served as President of the College, 1884- 
1905. Two other scholars who became tutors or adjunct pro- 
fessors in the last year of President Wingate's administration 
were also destined to play important roles in the life of the 
College : Needham Y. Gulley, who established the School of Law 
in 1894 and served as its first Dean for thirty-six years, and 
William Louis Poteat, who served the College for fifty years, 
twenty-two of them as President. 

The administration of President Thomas Henderson Pritch- 
ard, which followed that of President Wingate, was brief, only 
three years, and served principally to further President Win- 
gate's efforts to persuade the Baptists and North Carolinians 
generally to improve the deplorable condition of education in 
the state. Dr. Pritchard, the second alumnus of the College to 
serve as President, was an eloquent speaker and his prominent 
leadership among Baptists in the state succeeded in increasing 
the patronage of the College and in improving its image among 
its constituency. 

Dr. Charles Elisha Taylor, whom President Wingate had 
brought to the faculty in 1880, was elected in 1884 to serve as 
the sixth president of Wake Forest. While serving as professor of 
Moral Philosophy in 1882, he had proposed to the Board of 
Trustees a plan to increase the endowment from $53,000 to 
$100,000. He recommended a short one-year campaign and the 
solicitation of funds from a few wealthy men rather than 
the usual protracted campaign among Baptists generally who 
had little money to contribute. 

In the course of his efforts to increase the endowment, Pro- 
fessor Taylor succeeded in enlisting the support of Jabez A. 
Bostwick of New York City whose contributions during his life- 
time and later in his will, probated in 1923, established Wake 
Forest as a privately endowed college. The income from the 
$1,500,000 gift of stock in the Standard Oil Company remains 
one of the larger items in the University's endowment. 

44 



History 

President Taylor's administration, 1884-1905, also brought 
enrichment of the academic program in a variety of ways. Aca- 
demic departments were increased from eight to thirteen and the 
size of the faculty more than doubled. Two new schools were 
added: the School of Law in 1894 and the School of Medicine 
in 1902. Progress in other areas included the addition of three 
buildings, a science laboratory, a general classroom building and 
a new gymnasium. The campus was landscaped, and with the 
able assistance of President Taylor's co-worker, "Doctor" Tom 
Jeffries, over 400 trees were planted, making Magnolia grandi- 
flora almost synonymous with the Wake Forest campus. 

President Taylor was succeeded by Dr. William Louis Poteat 
of the Department of Biology. Affectionately known as "Dr. 
Billy" to a host of students during his twenty-two year ad- 
ministration, he continued to promote the general growth of all 
areas of the College. Special emphasis was placed on de- 
velopment in the area of sciences, reflecting in part the interests 
of the President and also in part the need to enrich the the pre- 
medical training required by the new School of Medicine. 

As student enrollment increased from 313 in 1905 to 742 in 
1927, there was a corresponding increase in the size of the 
faculty. Increased registration in religion, English, education, 
and social sciences required more administrative direction, and 
a Dean and a Registrar as well as Librarians were employed. 
Expansion of physical facilities included science laboratories, 
two new dormitories, an athletic field, a heating plant and an in- 
firmary. Wake Forest, joining the trend of the other colleges in 
the state, gave more attention to sports and achieved an envied 
reputation in baseball and football. 

Notable also during President Poteat's administration was the 
continued growth of the endowment. Through the efforts of 
Professor John B. Carlyle $117,000 was added, one-fourth of 
which was contributed by the General Education Board of New 
York. Later a gift of $100,000 in Duke Power Company stock 
was received from Benjamin N. Duke, and $458,000 from the 
Southern Baptist Convention. 

Beyond these significant material advances, President Poteat 
brought another distinction in the form of state and national 
recognition. A devout Christian, an eloquent speaker, an ac- 
complished scholar, he became a state-wide leader in education 

45 



History 

and probably the foremost Baptist layman in the state. As a 
distinguished scientist he was among the first to introduce the 
theory of evolution to his biology classes. His Christian com- 
mitment in his personal and public life enabled him to success- 
fully defend his views on evolution before the Baptist State Con- 
vention in 1924. This was considered a major victory for aca- 
demic freedom and attracted national attention. Due in part to 
his influence and that of the Wake Forest alumni who supported 
his view, the Legislature of North Carolina did not follow other 
Southern states in the passage of anti-evolution laws in the 
1920's. 

During the administration of Dr. Francis Pendleton Gaines, 
1927-1930, the academic program was strengthened. 

In 1930 the Trustees selected Dr. Thurman D. Kitchin, Dean 
of the Medical School, to fill the presidency. Dr. Kitchin was a 
member of a family prominent in state and national affairs. 
One brother, William W. Kitchin, had served as Governor of 
North Carolina, and another, Claude Kitchin, had served as 
Majority Leader in Congress. Dr. Kitchin's twenty-year admin- 
istration, 1930-50, was one of progress in spite of many obstacles 
— depression, destructive campus fires, one of which destroyed 
venerable Wait Hall, and the disruption caused by World War 
II which depleted the campus of students. 

Notable accomplishments during this period were the ap- 
proval of the School of Law by the American Bar Association in 
1936, and the removal of the School of Medicine to Winston- 
Salem in 1941 where it became a four-year School of Medicine 
in association with the North Carolina Baptist Hospital. It was 
named the Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest 
College in honor of the benefactor who made this expansion 
possible. 

World War II brought other changes. Although the College 
was able to remain open, the enrollment dropped to 474 in 1942. 
The College met this crisis by modifying its century old admis- 
sions policy and becoming a coeducational institution in 1942. 
To further fill the void, it leased its facilities to the Army Fi- 
nance School. In the post-war period, enrollment mushroomed 
with the return of the veterans and reached a peak of 1,762 stu- 
dents in 1949. 

46 



History 

The Dawn of a New Era 

Just prior to the beginning of World War II a major 
$7,000,000 capital expansion campaign for buildings and endow- 
ment had been launched by President Kitchin. The war forced 
the postponement of any construction but out of the campaign 
came a proposal which offered an opportunity for yet another 
re-birth. The Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation proposed that up 
to $350,000 a year of the income from the Foundation be given 
in perpetuity to Wake Forest College, provided the entire Col- 
lege was relocated in Winston-Salem, and with the stipulation 
that other friends of the College provide a campus site and 
buildings. In 1946 the Board of Trustees, the Convention, which 
had originally founded Wake Forest, and the Baptist constit- 
uency of the State accepted this proposal. 

To remove a century old College from its essentially rural 
setting 110 miles to a new campus in an urban environment 
would require leadership of great vision, determination and 
youthful vigor. President Kitchin had led the College through 
twenty eventful years embracing depression, fires, and World 
War II. Upon reaching his sixty-fifth birthday, he resigned. To 
succeed him and to organize the removal to Winston-Salem, the 
Trustees in 1950 elected to the presidency Dr. Harold Wayland 
Tribble, then President of Andover-Newton Theological Semi- 
nary. 

President Tribble immediately began to mobilize the alumni, 
friends of the College, and the Baptist State Convention in 
support of the great transition. The State Convention adopted 
a nine-year program of increased annual support to all the Bap- 
tist Colleges in the state and pledged funds for the building of 
Wait Chapel on the new campus. 

The Reynolds Foundation agreed to set aside for buildings 
the $350,000 annual support until the removal actually occurred, 
and from these funds the Z. Smith Reynolds Library was con- 
structed. The Foundation also offered a $3,000,000 challenge gift, 
from which Reynolda Hall was constructed. The citizens of 
Winston-Salem and Forsyth County contributed the cost of 
construction of a science building, and William Neal Reynolds 
contributed $1,000,000 for a gymnasium. 

A three hundred and twenty acre campus site was provided 
through the generosity of the late Charles H. and Mary Reyn- 

47 



History 

olds Babcock. Ground-breaking ceremonies were held on Octo- 
ber 15, 1952, and a crowd of more than 20,000 watched Presi- 
dent Harry S. Truman lift the first shovel of dirt to begin con- 
struction on the new campus. Between 1952 and 1956 fourteen 
buildings were erected on the campus and the actual removal of 
the College to its new home was accomplished in time for the 
opening of the summer session in 1956. 

In the next eleven years of President Tribble's administration, 
the College experienced many changes. It had revised its cur- 
riculum as a prelude to the removal to the new campus, offering 
a more flexible program to students. The number of students 
increased to 3,022, and the size of the faculty expanded rapidly, 
reducing the teacher-student ratio to fourteen to one. 

The campus was further expanded with the erection of a new 
Life Sciences building in 1961, a new women's dormitory in 
1962, and a new general classroom building in 1963; and work 
was begun on a new 31,000 seat stadium, which was completed 
in 1968. 

Additional resources also came to the College in its new home. 
In 1954 just prior to the move, the will of Colonel George Foster 
Hankins provided over $1,000,000 to be used for scholarships. In 
1956 the Ford Foundation contributed $680,000 to the endow- 
ment of the School of Arts and Sciences and $1,600,000 to the 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine. At the time of the removal of 
the College, the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation increased its 
annual support from $350,000 to $500,000. After the completion 
of a challenge gift of $3,000,000 offered in 1965, the Foundation 
raised its annual contribution to $620,000. 

The holdings of the University's libraries more than tripled 
and the library was awarded the income from an endowment 
fund of about $4,500,000 contributed by the Mary Reynolds 
Babcock Foundation and Mrs. Nancy Reynolds. 

Graduate work, first offered in 1866, but suspended during the 
removal program, was resumed in 1961 when the Trustees es- 
tablished the Division of Graduate Studies. In 1967, recognizing 
the augmented resources of the College and the fact that in all 
except name it was a university rather than a college, the 
Trustees officially changed the name to Wake Forest University. 
The Division of Graduate Studies became the Wake Forest 
University Graduate School. The name Wake Forest College 

48 



History 

was retained as the designation for the undergraduate School of 
Arts and Sciences. 

In 1967, after seventeen years of strenuous effort, President 
Tribble retired, leaving as his lasting memorial the removal of 
the College from Wake Forest to Winston-Salem and its changed 
status from College to University, with enhanced resources. 

As his successor the Trustees chose Dr. James Ralph Scales, 
former President of Oklahoma Baptist University and former 
Dean of Arts and Sciences, Oklahoma State University. Since 
1967 during the six years of his administration, there have been 
important new developments. The Guy T. and Clara H. Cars- 
well Scholarship Fund, valued at $1,600,000, was established to 
undergird the undergraduate School of Arts and Sciences. The 
School of Business Administration was converted into a Grad- 
uate School of Management in 1969 and named in honor of 
Charles H. Babcock, one of the principal benefactors of the 
University. Through the generosity of the Z. Smith Reynolds 
Foundation and Mrs. Nancy Susan Reynolds, a new building 
was constructed to house this School. A subsequent gift of 
$2,000,000 was received from the Mary Reynolds Babcock Foun- 
dation to be used as endowment. 

In 1971 the School of Law added a $500,000 wing which al- 
lowed for an increase in enrollment and faculty. The Bowman 
Gray School of Medicine-Baptist Hospital complex also com- 
pleted a $30,000,000 expansion program. In addition, a new 
women's dormitory housing approximately 300 undergraduates 
was completed on the Reynolda campus. 

Complementing the material growth, the University re-ex- 
amined its program and goals and adopted a number of changes 
in its curriculum. In 1971 it adopted a new calendar and the 
4-1-4 curriculum and a cooperative exchange of courses with 
Salem College; and established a Wake Forest University Over- 
seas Center in Venice, Italy, and in Dijon, France. 

As a mark of its increased stature, the Kenan Foundation 
in 1970 awarded a grant of $500,000 for the establishment of a 
Kenan Professorship. 

In retrospect, the University has had a long, arduous and 
fruitful history. With the pains of removal and rebirth behind 
it, with a modern and well-equipped campus and greatly en- 
hanced resources, and a youthful administration and faculty, it 

49 



Endowment 

stands on the threshold of a new era. Relocation has brought 
new facilities and new opportunities but the ideals remain un- 
changed and the University continues to function as its founders 
envisioned, Pro Humanitate. 

Endowment, Trust Funds and Foundations 

In 1865 the endowment fund of Wake Forest University 
was $11,700, the remnant from the wreck of war. Under the 
terms of the will of Mr. Jabez A. Bostwick, the endowment 
was increased, in 1923, by stock valued at about $1,500,000. 
On August 3, 1939, the resources of the Bowman Gray Founda- 
tion were awarded to Wake Forest College, to be used exclu- 
sively by the School of Medicine. 

Under the terms of the will of Colonel George Foster Hankins 
of Lexington, North Carolina, who died in 1954, the George 
Foster Hankins Foundation was established, the income to be 
used for scholarships. The assets of the Foundation on June 30, 
1973, were approximately $1,750,000. 

The Ford Foundation in 1956 made two gifts to the endow- 
ment of the College, the sum of $680,500 for the School of Arts 
and Sciences and $1,600,000 for the Bowman Gray School of 
Medicine. 

The Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation made gifts, in 1958 
and 1962, of the Reynolda Gardens and an endowment with the 
total value of approximately $1,500,000. In 1965 the College 
received an additional gift of land on which a plant of the 
Western Electric Company is located. This gift, valued at 
$3,500,000 is to be used for the support of the Library and the 
Chair of Botany. In December, 1969, an endowment in the 
amount of $2,300,000 was received from the Foundation for the 
use and benefit of the Babcock Graduate School of Management. 

In 1965, 1966, and 1967 a gift totaling $1,000,000, the income 
from which is to be used to support the Library, was received 
from Mrs. Nancy Reynolds. 

From the estate of the late Guy T. Carswell, who died in 
1966, the University received the Guy T. and Clara H. Carswell 
Scholarship Fund. Investments in this fund were approximately 
$2,400,000 at June 30, 1973. 

On June 30, 1973, all endowment funds controlled by the 
University had a book value of $47,952,000 and market value 
of $48,511,000. 

50 



Academic Buildings 



In addition to the endowment funds controlled by the 
Trustees, various trust funds are held by banks for the benefit 
of the University. Among these are the James A. Gray Trust 
Fund, the Mary K. Fassett Trust Fund, the Lucy Teague 
Fassett Memorial Trust Fund, and the Nathalie H. Bernard 
Fund. 

The Trustees of the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, Inc. 
and The Trustees of Wake Forest College entered into a con- 
tract on November 16, 1946, whereby the Foundation made 
available to the College income of the Foundation up to 
$350,000 per year in perpetuity, this sum being increased to 
$500,000 in 1955. In 1965, the Foundation announced a match- 
ing grant of $3,000,000 for a period of four years. Upon reaching 
this goal, the Foundation increased the annual grant of $620,000 
in 1968. In 1972, they announced an additional grant of $200,000 
per year for five years. 

Buildings and Grounds 

Wake Forest University is situated on approximately 320 
acres of land, and the physical plant consists of 30 buildings, 
including 12 apartment buildings for faculty and married stu- 
dents. The property was given to the University by the Mary 
Reynolds Babcock Foundation and Mr. Charles H. Babcock, 
and construction of the new campus was begun in 1952. It 
was occupied for the first time during the 1956 summer session. 
The buildings are of modified Georgian architecture and con- 
structed of Old Virginia brick trimmed in granite and limestone. 
Situated on beautifully landscaped hills, the campus is one 
of the most attractive in the South. 

The Reynolda Gardens annex, consisting of 148 acres and 
including Reynolda Woods, Reynolda Village, and Reynolda 
Gardens, is adjacent to the campus on the south. This tract 
includes a formal garden, greenhouses, parking areas, and 
a wooded area with trails. The formal garden features one 
of the first collections of Japanese cherry trees in the United 
States. This area of natural beauty was a gift to the College 
from the Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation through transfers 
made in 1958, 1961, and 1963. 

Academic Buildings 
Wait Chapel. Named in memory of the first President of Wake 
Forest College, Wait Chapel, with an auditorium which seats 

51 



Academic Buildings 



twenty-three hundred, contains Davis Chapel, which seats 150 
and is used for special services. Wingate Hall, attached to Wait 
Chapel, provides classroom space for the Departments of Music 
and Religion. Wingate Hall is named in honor of Washington 
Manly Wingate, President of Wake Forest College, 1854-1879. 

Reynolda Hall. This building serves both as an administra- 
tion building and a student center. Food services are centralized 
in Reynolda Hall and consist of a cafeteria, snack shop, banquet 
room, the Magnolia Room, and other smaller dining rooms. The 
University Computer Center is located in the basement. 

The Z. Smith Reynolds Library. Situated at the center of 
the academic campus, this building contains space for eight 
tiers of book stacks, with a capacity of about one million 
volumes. Surrounding the book stacks are four floors of rooms 
for reading, reference, and various other uses of a modem 
library. The University Theatre is located on the top level of 
the Library. 

Salem Hall. Directly west of the Library, this three-story 
building contains laboratories, classrooms, and offices for the 
Departments of Chemistry and Physics. 

Winston Hall. Located just west of Salem Hall, this building 
was occupied in September 1961. It provides instructional and 
office space for the Departments of Biology and Psychology. 

The W. N. Reynolds Gymnasium. Located just east of Rey- 
nolda Hall, this building is equipped with classrooms for 
instruction in physical education, courts for basketball and 
other indoor sports, a swimming pool, and offices for the Depart- 
ment of Physical Education and the Department of Athletics. 
Surrounding the Gymnasium are sports fields and courts for 
tennis, track, soccer, football, and field hockey. Memorial Coli- 
seum is used for intercollegiate basketball games. The Depart- 
ment of Military Science is also housed in this building. 

Harold W. Tribble Hall. This building accommodates the 
social sciences and the humanities and contains instructional 
and office space, a small projection theatre, the philosophy 
library, a curriculum materials center, the Honors seminar room, 
and a main lecture room which seats 200. 

52 



Libraries 

Law Building. This four-story structure contains classrooms, 
offices, a moot court, an assembly room, a library, faculty and 
student lounges, and other specific use rooms. An expansion of 
the building in 1972 provided additional classrooms, offices, and 
library space. 

Charles H. Babcock Building. Occupied in September, 1969, 
this building contains offices and classrooms for the Department 
of Business and Accountancy, the Department of Mathematics 
and the Babcock Graduate School of Management. A variety of 
instructional spaces are available, including ampitheatres, semi- 
nar rooms, library, and computer terminal stations for individual 
student use. The building was expanded in 1972 to provide new 
offices, a seminar room, and a reading room for the Department 
of Mathematics. 

Libraries 

The several libraries of the University contain a total of 
519,715 volumes. The Z. Smith Reynolds Library holds the 
main collection of 399,228 volumes of general and diversified 
research character. The other libraries represent, in volume 
holdings as follows, the respective areas they serve: the Library 
of the School of Law, 49,227; that of the Bowman Gray School 
of Medicine, 66,118; and that of the Charles H. Babcock Grad- 
uate School of Management, recently established in 1970, 5,142. 
A rapidly growing microtext collection is maintained, principally 
in the Z. Smith Reynolds Library. There are available 13,806 
reels of microfilm, containing files of local, national, and foreign 
newspapers; and 163,847 pieces of other microforms, which in- 
clude such substantial items as the British Parliamentary Papers, 
the Human Relations Area File, and the Encyclopaedia Britan- 
nica "Library of American Civilization" on ultrafiche. 

The Z. Smith Reynolds Library provides excellent support 
for a liberal arts curriculum and a somewhat limited, although 
expanding, graduate program. In certain areas special collecting 
has been undertaken. For instance, moderate emphasis has 
been placed on North Carolina and Southeastern materials; the 
Ethel Taylor Crittenden Collection in Baptist History has ac- 
quired more than 7,500 items which include files of Baptist 

53 



Libraries 

serials and individual church records; and the works of selected 
late nineteenth and early twentieth century authors, together 
with appropriate critical studies, are being collected in the 
Rare Book Rooms. 

An open-stack policy enables users to consult books directly 
at the shelves. With a few exceptions in special collections, the 
books are classified according to the Library of Congress sched- 
ules. Current issues and bound volumes of periodicals in chemis- 
try and physics are shelved in Salem Hall for convenience in 
laboratory research. 

In addition to regular University appropriations, the Z. Smith 
Reynolds Library receives the income from an endowment fund 
of about $4,500,000, the result of two major gifts: a donation of 
assets worth $3,500,000 by the Mary Reynolds Babcock Founda- 
tion; and a gift of $1,000,000 made in 1967 by Mrs. Nancy 
Reynolds. This income is applied principally to the purchase of 
books necessary for graduate studies, although portions have 
been used for much needed changes and additions in the Library 
building. 

Other gifts have enriched the University library collections. 
Mr. Tracy McGregor provided a collection of valuable titles on 
the colonial and early national periods of American history. To 
acquire the important editions of Edmund Spenser and related 
background material, a contribution was made by Dr. Charles 
G. Smith in honor of his wife, Cornelia Marschall Smith. Dr. 
Herman Harrell Home established a fund for the purchase of 
titles of a general nature. A collection in music was presented 
to the Library by Dr. and Mrs. Stringham of Chapel Hill. It is 
known as the Edwin John Stringham Collection in Music and 
Allied Subjects. 

Dr. Charles Lee Smith of Raleigh bequeathed to the Uni- 
versity his personal library of about 7,000 volumes, rich in first 
editions, while a bequest from his brother, Oscar T. Smith of 
Baltimore, affords additional purchases of similar volumes. 

The Paschal Collection was established Christmas, 1950 by 
Dr. George W. Paschal, Jr., Raleigh surgeon, in recognition of 
the interest in the Library manifested by his father, George 
Washington Paschal, and also in memory of his father's twin 

54 



Libraries 

brother, Robert Lee Paschal. The Collection is regularly en- 
larged and, although heterogenous in nature, primarily contains 
material relating to the humanities. The aim of the founder of 
the Collection is to add to the working efficiency of the Library. 
While this Collection is principally supported by the donor, it 
has also received and welcomes contributions from interested 
friends. A special bookplate is used for items acquired for the 
Collection. 

In 1970 the acquisition of an important Mark Twain collec- 
tion was made possible through the generosity of Mrs. Nancy 
Reynolds. The collection contains many variant editions of his 
works, with critical material and memorabilia. From the estate 
of Judge R. Hunt Parker the Library received a well-selected 
collection of more than 3,000 volumes. 

The Library of the School of Law contains 49,227 volumes, 
including the reports, digests, and statutes required by the 
American Association of Law Schools, together with the leading 
periodicals, encyclopedias, and textbooks. 

Library facilities at the Bowman Gray School of Medicine 
include 66,118 volumes, furnishing the periodicals, texts, and 
monographs essential to instruction and research in medical 
theory and practice. 

The Charles H. Babcock Graduate School of Management is 
developing a library of basic materials for its graduate program. 
Still modest in size because of its recent origin, now containing 
5,142 volumes, the library is steadily moving forward toward an 
adequate collection. 

The Spilman Philosophy Seminar houses carefully selected 
books for the use of advanced students in philosophy. Although 
not supported by library funds, but by an endowment given 
by Dr. B. W. Spilman and by the A. C. Reid Philosophy Fund, 
it forms a valuable part of the book resources of the University. 

The Library of the Military Science Department, located in 
the Gymnasium, has available for student use over 2,000 books 
and periodicals. In addition to major military conflicts involving 
the United States, the material covers such subjects as com- 

55 



Art Collection 



munism, the "Cold War," counterinsurgency, anti-guerrilla war- 
fare, foreign policy, nuclear warfare, and space activities. 

Art Collection 

The T. J. Simmons Collection, presented to the College by the 
late Dr. Thomas Jackson Simmons of Gainesville, Ga., was form- 
ally opened to the public on June 2, 1941. It includes about 
sixty paintings, thirty-five etchings and lithographs, five pieces 
of sculpture, and several other art objects. 

The collection was enriched in 1957 by three paintings from 
the Hammer Galleries given by Mr. Arnold Kirkeby, and in 
1960 by two paintings given by Mr. Clark Hartwell and three 
by Mrs. April Ruth Akston. Nearly all of the paintings are 
hung in public areas of various buildings on the campus. 




56 



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57 






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58 



STUDENT COMMUNITY 

Student Government 

The branches of student government are executive, legislative 
and judicial. 

The executive branch of the student government is comprised 
of the four student body officers, president, vice president, sec- 
retary and treasurer, and the executive advisory committees. Re- 
porting directly to the officers are the Dining, Health, Psycho- 
logical Services and Athletic Advisory Committees who work 
on improving service to students in these areas. These commit- 
tees are open to any students who wish to serve. 

The Student Legislature is composed of fifty-six student rep- 
resentatives. The vice president of the student body serves as 
Speaker. The Legislature shall represent the interests of students 
in social and academic matters and shall promote and fund 
projects which benefit the student body and the community. 
This group shall also oversee the dispensation of funds to stu- 
dent groups and recommend the chartering of newly formed 
student organizations. Major committees of this body are the 
Charter Committee, the Student Budget Advisory Committee, 
and the Student Economic Board. 

Responsibilities for the judicial branch are divided between an 
honor council and a judicial board. The student honor council 
consists of ten members: two selected by the Honor Council of 
the previous year plus two representatives from each class. 
There are three non-voting faculty advisers. 

The Honor System is an expression of the concern of Wake 
Forest University that its students shall be dominated by ideals 
of honor and integrity. The Honor System is an integral part of 
the Student Government of the College as adopted by the 
students and approved by the faculty. The essence of the Honor 
System is that each student's word can be trusted implicitly and 
that any violation of a student's word is an offense against the 
whole student community. The Honor System binds the student 
in such matters as the following: he must neither give nor re- 
ceive aid upon any examination, quiz or other pledge work; he 
must have complete respect for the property rights of others; he 

59 



Student Board 



must not give false testimony or pass a worthless check knowing 
it to be such; he must confront any student who has violated 
the Honor System and tell him that it is his responsibility to 
report himself or face the possibility of being turned in to the 
Honor Council. 

It is the duty of the Student Honor Council to receive, prefer, 
investigate, and arrange trial proceedings in all charges of viola- 
tions of the Honor System. If a student is found guilty of cheat- 
ing, the minimum penalty shall be a recommended grade of F 
for the course and a probation period, and the maximum penalty 
shall be expulsion. The minimum penalty for stealing, plagiarism, 
interfering with the Honor Council, or refusing to pay just debts 
shall be probation. The maximum penalty shall be suspension on 
the first offense. Expulsion may occur thereafter. All actions of 
the Council shall be reported to the Dean of the College. 

Any student convicted of violating the Honor Code is in- 
eligible to represent the University in any manner whatsoever 
until the period of his punishment, be it suspension, probation, 
or any other form, is completed and the student is returned to 
good standing. A student who has been suspended shall be re- 
admitted to the College only on the approval of the Faculty or 
its Executive Committee, and during the period of suspension 
he shall not be certified to another institution as being in good 
standing. 

Students enforcing the Honor System are protecting the in- 
tegrity of their student community and their individual rights 
and reputations. They thereby enjoy the confidence of one an- 
other, the Faculty, the Administration and the public. 

The Student Judicial Board is composed of twelve members, 
at least three men and three women, who are elected at large 
from the student body. It is the duty of the Student Judicial 
Board to receive, prefer, and try all charges of social misconduct 
and violations of University rules and regulations for individual 
students as well as student organizations not covered by the 
Honor Council. A student who violates these regulations or who 
behaves in such a way as to bring reproach upon himself or upon 
the University is subject to penalties ranging from verbal repri- 
mand to suspension on the first offense. Expulsion may occur 
only thereafter. 

60 



Residence Council 



College Union 

Among the College Union facilities are meeting rooms, 
lounges, offices for student organizations, a billiard and table 
tennis room, a snack shop, and coffee house. The Union also 
operates an information center, a lost and found service, 
private and general music listening facilities and a Western 
Union station. The Office of Student Activities, located in room 
124 of Reynolda Hall, is responsible for scheduling activities, 
assisting student organizations, and providing supporting equip- 
ment and services necessary in translating ideas into reality. 

The College Union Board of Directors, representing all under- 
graduate and graduate students, cooperates with the Union staff 
in the day-to-day operation of the facility and supervises the 
efforts of a large body of student volunteers who develop and 
present programs for the entire University. Through the de- 
velopment of various programs and activities, it is the intent of 
both the Union and the Board of Directors to meet the following 
goals: 

— to be a campus center where all members of the campus 
community can meet formally and informally; 

— to provide services and facilities to the University com- 
munity; 

— to complement the educational goals of the University; pro- 
viding cultural, social, and recreational programs; and 

— to maintain the Union as an open forum where all sides of 
issues can be aired. 

Men's Residence Council 

A major student development at Wake Forest is the Men's 
Residence Council, an organization open to all male residents. 
The fundamental objective of the organization has been to en- 
courage students to realize their potentialities and to implement 
a comprehensive concept of education. Learning is not restricted 
to the confines of the classroom, but instead, occurs in some of 
its deeper dimensions in extra-class interaction with fellow stu- 
dents and faculty through residence hall life. 

While the central Men's Residence Council's overall guidance 
is necessary and important, the real strength of the MRC is 
found in the four Houses themselves. Each House has its own 

61 



Tournaments 

officers and carries out its own academic, athletic, and social pro- 
grams. The MRC House system provides the student with an 
opportunity to become actively involved in student life at Wake 
Forest. 

Women's Residence Council 

The Women's Residence Council is concerned with a program 
designed to nurture a comprehensive concept of education. Oc- 
casions for interaction with all members of the college com- 
munity are provided for through discussions, social and sports 
events. The Women's Residence Council participates in de- 
veloping policy to create the kind of atmosphere in which 
maximum development may take place. 

Joint Faculty-Student Committees 

Students and faculty work together on a number of joint com- 
mittees which deal with many aspects of college life, such as 
admissions, honors, undergraduate life, library, evaluation study, 
discipline, student activities, and lectures. 

Forensic Activities 

Wake Forest has always stressed participation in debating 
and allied speech activities, and the University holds member- 
ship in a number of state and national speech organizations, 
including Delta Sigma Rho-Tau Kappa Alpha, national hon- 
orary forensic fraternity. Representatives of the University 
engage in state, regional, and national tournaments, and take 
part in debates, oratorical contests, and many other forms of 
competitive speaking. 

All undergraduate students in good standing are eligible to 
participate in forensics and to represent the University in inter- 
collegiate competition. 

Debate and Speech Tournaments 

A. Novice Tournament 

In the fall of each year the University sponsors a debate 
tournament to which are invited college novice debaters. 
Awards are given to the winning schools at the end of the 
tournament. The tournament is open to college students who 
have never previously participated in intercollegiate debating. 

62 



Theatre 

B. Dixie Classic Varsity Tournament 

In the late fall, the University sponsors a national debate 
tournament to which are invited colleges and universities who 
excel in debate. Trophies are given to the winning schools. 

C. High School Invitational Tournament 

In the winter of each year, the University chapter of DSR- 
TKA sponsors a high school debate tournament to which are 
invited high school debaters from throughout the Southeast. 
Awards are given to the winning schools. 

D. University Speech Festival for High School Students 

In the spring of each year, the University sponsors a speech 
festival, to which are invited the high schools of North Caro- 
lina. Awards are given to the winning schools and individuals in 
oral interpretation, radio announcing, extemporaneous speak- 
ing, oratory, after-dinner speaking and duet acting. 

Debate and Theatre Workshops 

High school students are invited to participate in the Sum- 
mer Debate and Theatre Workshops which are held during the 
regular summer session, and which are open to students from 
all states. Students in the Debate Workshop are given an op- 
portunity to debate the national debate query in advance of the 
regular debate season. Theatre Workshop students study acting 
techniques, technical theatre, theatre history, and production 
theory in addition to their active participation in several short 
plays. 

Senior Orations 

On the second Monday in April the faculty selects four 
members of the senior class as speakers for commencement 
day. The nominations are made by the Student Life Com- 
mittee of the faculty after consultation with the Department 
of Speech. The speakers selected are required to present their 
commencement addresses, limited to one thousand words, to 
the committee for approval before May 16. 

University Theatre 

The Wake Forest University Theatre, located on the 7th and 
8th levels of the Z. Smith Reynolds Library, presents four major 

63 



Music 

productions annually. In past seasons the University Theatre 
has presented Twelfth Night, Macbeth, A Man for All Seasons, 
Hedda Gabler, The Promise, A Funny Thing Happened on the 
Way to the Forum, The Threepenny Opera, We Bombed In 
New Haven, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Hamlet, 
A Flea in Her Ear and numerous other plays, both modern and 
Classic. In addition to the main stage presentations, there is an 
active theatre laboratory where students produce new plays as 
well as innovative interpretations of standard works. The Uni- 
versity Theatre offers a meaningful, creative outlet for all stu- 
dents at the University. Any student enrolled in the University 
is eligible to audition for the plays and to work with the pro- 
duction staffs. 

The Wake Forest Chapter of the National Collegiate Players, 
honorary dramatic fraternity, was formed in the Spring of 1963. 
Eligibility for membership is determined by a student's scholas- 
tic average and an accumulation of points acquired through par- 
ticipation in University Theatre activities. The Anthony Aston 
Society, a theatre service organization, is open to participants 
in the activities of the University Theatre and membership is 
determined by an accumulation of points through work on the 
productions. 

Music Opportunities 

Students at Wake Forest University have ample and widely 
varied opportunities to attend Music Department events either 
as listeners or participants. All students are encouraged to at- 
tend the activities sponsored by the Department of Music: 
faculty recitals, visiting artists and lecturers, student recitals 
(which are held on the first and third Mondays of each month at 
7 p.m. in the lower auditorium of Wingate Hall), senior recitals, 
instrumental and vocal student organization programs. The De- 
partment encourages participation in all of the many organiza- 
tions sponsored by the Department of Music. These include: 
the Demon Deacon Marching Band, the Symphonic Wind En- 
semble, the Concert Band, the Basketball Varsity Pep Band, 
the nine o'clock Jazz Ensemble, the ten o'clock Jazz Ensemble, 
the Percussion Ensemble, the University Woodwind Quintet, 
and the University Brass Quintet. In addition, the Wake Forest 
Little Symphony, the Chapel Choir, the Touring Choir, the 

64 



Religious Program 



Madrigal Singers, and the Opera Workshop are all activities 
offered by the Department of Music for students. Some of the 
foregoing activities are offered for University credit. 

Religious Program 

Wake Forest was founded as a result of a religious concern for 
education and missions. That same concern means in part that 
the University undertakes to help students become authentic 
whole persons individually and in relationship to others. The re- 
ligious program seeks to demonstrate the cohesion of Christi- 
anity with academic excellence. Chaplains, faculty members and 
others lead weekly worship services. The Campus Ministry sup- 
ports other informal worship programs initiated by students. 
These worship services are voluntary, but all students are ex- 
pected to attend University convocations at the opening of 
school and the anniversary of Founders' Day at the beginning 
of the second semester. 

The Campus Ministry seeks to further the religious pilgrimage 
and commitment of students by providing opportunities for 
them to work in local churches, engage in tutoring programs, 
participate as team members for church weekends, study the 
Bible, and social get-togethers. The Campus Ministers provide 
vocational guidance for all students and attempt special pro- 
grams for those interested in church vocations. The Campus 
Ministry in miniature can be viewed at the annual Pre-School 
Conference because it brings freshmen, upperclassmen, faculty 
and chaplains into discussion groups, worship services, and rec- 
reational activities. It also provides a Sunday through Thursday 
"Attic Coffee House" in the Library. 

The Wake Forest Baptist Church is at worship each Sunday 
in Wait Chapel. Its constituency embraces students, faculty, ad- 
ministration, and people from the city of Winston-Salem. This 
relationship between the University and the campus church has 
existed for many years. Although planted in the soil of Baptist 
tradition and associated with larger Baptist bodies, the Wake 
Forest Church has embraced and contributed to the growing 
ecumenism of the University. Its membership and mission are 
open to all who may seek its ministry and may wish to use it as 
an instrument for their mission to the world, 

65 



Challenge 

University Radio Station — WFDD-FM 

The University Radio Station, WFDD-FM, broadcasts year- 
round to the campus and throughout Piedmont North Carolina. 
The station is fully licensed by the Federal Communications 
Commission. Programs include music, news, sports, lectures, dis- 
cussions, interviews, documentaries and drama. The station pro- 
vides an opportunity for students to learn all phases of radio 
production while actually participating as announcers, inter- 
viewers, directors, newscasters, sportscasters, actors, and writers. 

Participation is open to all students. Several financial assis- 
tantships, as well as summer jobs, are available each year for 
qualified students. 

Constance P. Nelson serves as Station Manager, Lewis Kanoy 
as Station Engineer, and Jeanne P. Szabo as Music Director. 

Publications 

The Student, a literary magazine, Old Gold and Black, a 
weekly newspaper, and The Howler, the University annual, are 
published by the students. 

Challenge 

CHALLENGE is a biennial symposium on contemporary 
American affairs directed and coordinated by University stu- 
dents. The CHALLENGE staff corporately selects an issue of 
major concern to which the University directs its attention in 
three major ways: 1) noted experts are asked to relate their 
ideas to the University community, 2) students, faculty, and 
administrators corporately analyze and consider the ideas pre- 
sented, making suggestions and analyses of their own, and, 3) 
an evaluative process is conducted whereby Wake Forest as 
an academic, sociological, and educational community works to 
meet the exigencies of the issue under consideration. CHAL- 
LENGE originated from a rap session among students in 1964, 
and is now in its ninth year. Past CHALLENGE programs have 
considered such areas as "The Emerging World of the American 
Negro," "The Implications of Prosperity," "Urban Crisis: The 
Students' Response," "The Challenge of Survival: not man 
apart," and have brought such speakers as Sen. Edmund Muskie, 
Harvey Cox, Michael Harrington, Ralph Nader, Rene Dubos, 
Daniel Bell, and Sen. John Tunney. 

66 



Awards 

Medals and Other Awards 

The A. D. Ward Medal is awarded annually to the senior 
making the best address on commencement day. 

The Lura Baker Paden Medal, established in 1922 by Dean S. 
Paden (B.A., 1918), is awarded annually to the outstanding 
senior majoring in business. 

The F. B. Currin Medal is awarded annually for the best 
oration on the general topic of Christ in Modern Life. 

The Carolina Award is presented to the major in Biology 
who writes the best paper on a subject selected by the National 
Biology Society. Given by the Carolina Biological Supply Com- 
pany of Elon College, N. C. 

The Biology Research Award is presented to the major in 
Biology who does the best piece of original research during 
the year. Given by the Beta Rho Chapter of Beta Beta Beta 
of Wake Forest University. 

The Poteat Award is presented to the student in Biology 
111-112 who is adjudged the most outstanding, and plans to 
major in the department. Given by the Will Corporation of 
Georgia, and sponsored by Beta Beta Beta. 

The William E. Speas Memorial Award is presented each year 
to the outstanding graduating senior in the Department of 
Physics. 

The A. M. Pullen and Company Medal is presented each year 
during commencement to the graduating accounting major who 
has reached the highest achievement in accounting studies. 

The Wall Street Journal Medal and one year's subscription 
to the Journal are received each year by the graduating senior 
who has been most outstanding in finance courses. 

The Tom Baker Award In Debate is given to the senior who 
has made the most outstanding contribution in the field of inter- 
collegiate debating. 

The Tom Baker Award In Publications is given to the senior 
who has made the most outstanding contribution in the field of 
student publications. 

The Claud H. Richards Award in Politics is presented an- 
nually to the outstanding graduating senior in the Department 
of Politics. 

67 



Societies 

The H. Broadus Jones Award is presented annually to the 
college student whose paper shows most insight into the works 
of Shakespeare. 

Fraternities 

The following social fraternities have been established: Alpha 
Sigma Phi, Delta Sigma Phi, Kappa Alpha, Kappa Sigma, 
Lambda Chi Alpha, Pi Kappa Alpha, Sigma Chi, Sigma Phi 
Epsilon, Sigma Pi, Theta Chi. 

The Interfraternity Council, under the supervision of the 
Faculty Committee on Student Life, is the governing body 
of the social fraternities. The Council endeavors to maintain a 
high standard of conduct and scholarship. The Council offers 
a cup to the fraternity whose members made the highest class 
grades. By order of the faculty, students who are on probation 
for any reason may not be initiated into any fraternity until 
the end of their probationary period. 

The following professional fraternities have been established: 
Phi Alpha Delta (law), Phi Delta Phi (law), Phi Epsilon Kappa 
(physical education) and Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia (Music). 
There is also a chapter of Alpha Phi Omega, national service 
fraternity. 

Societies 

The following societies for women have been established: 
Fideles, SOPH, STEPS, Strings, Thymes. Any woman under- 
graduate may hold membership in one of the societies. Their 
purposes are social and service. 

The Intersociety Council, under the supervision of the Dean 
of Women and the Faculty Committee on Student Life, is the 
governing body of the societies. 

Honor Societies 
The following honor societies have been established: Alpha 
Epsilon Delta (pre-medicine), Beta Beta Beta (biology), Delta 
Kappa Alpha (ministry), Delta Phi Alpha (German), Delta 
Sigma Rho-Tau Kappa Alpha (forensic), Eta Sigma Phi 
(classics), Gamma Sigma Epsilon (chemistry), Kappa Mu 
Epsilon (mathematics), National Collegiate Players (drama- 
tics), Omicron Delta Epsilon (economics), Pershing Rifles (mili- 

68 



Activities 

tary), Phi Alpha Theta (history), Phi Sigma Iota (Romance 
languages), Pi Gamma Mu (social science), Rho Tau Sigma 
(radio), Scabbard and Blade (military), Phi Beta Kappa, Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa, and Mortar Board. There is also a Wake 
Forest University Student Section of the American Institute of 
Physics. 

ODE is the international honor society in economics. The Eta 
Chapter of North Carolina was chartered at W.F.U. on May 22, 
1970. 

Phi Beta Kappa, an honor society founded at the College of 
William and Mary in 1776 and having chapters in many Amer- 
ican colleges and universities, each year invites to membership 
a limited number of students who have displayed personal quali- 
ties of high character and who particularly have distinguished 
themselves in fields of liberal scholarship. 

Omicron Delta Kappa, an intercollegiate honor society which 
has as its purpose the recognition and encouragement "of intel- 
ligent, democratic leadership among college men," elects an- 
nually on the basis of character and eminence in one or more 
of the following five phases of campus life: "scholarship; 
athletics; student government; social and religious activities; 
publications; and forensic, dramatic, musical and other cultural 
activities." 

Mortar Board is an intercollegiate honor society for women. 
Its purpose is "to advance the spirit of service and fellowship 
among university women, to promote and maintain a high stand- 
ard of scholarship and to recognize and encourage leadership, 
and to stimulate and develop a finer type of college woman." 
Membership is based on service, scholarship, and leadership. 

Recreational and Sports Activities 
Recognizing the importance of recreation and fitness activi- 
ties in maintaining the well-being of students, the University 
provides extensive sports and recreational facilities and a faculty 
of trained specialists to supervise and direct activities in these 
areas. Each student is given the opportunity to develop his in- 
dividual interest and competence to the level of proficiency he 
desires. There are several facets to this approach. First, there is 
an adequate University health service program which is basic 
to the health and physical well-being of all students. The next 
step is the activity classes both of a required and elective nature 

69 



Activities 

where both women and men students may develop skill and 
interest in a wide variety of activities. 

On top of this base in the recreational and activity pyramid 
is a broad program of intramurals and general recreational ac- 
tivities for both men and women. Men participate in 19 different 
sports in three separate leagues: fraternity, house, and inde- 
pendent. Women participate in 20 sports in two leagues: society 
and independent. More than 50% of the students take part in 
these programs. Handsome trophies and medals are awarded to 
all team and individual champions. 

Included in this middle of the pyramid is the general recrea- 
tion program consisting of sports and recreation clubs such as 
aquatics, gymnastics, dance, weight training, and soccer, Wo- 
men's Recreation Association, Sigma Delta Psi and Phi Epsilon 
Kappa. Beyond these activities students are encouraged to par- 
ticipate on their own in a voluntary recreation and fitness 
program. 

At the top of the pyramid and growing out of the other as- 
pects is the intercollegiate athletic program. This is the program 
for the athletically gifted and represents the epitome of sports 
participation. For women, intercollegiate teams are sponsored 
in golf, tennis, basketball, volleyball, and field hockey. A full 
slate of games is scheduled in each sport and the rules of the 
Division of Girls and Women Sports, AAHPER govern play. In 
the program for men, the University is a member of the National 
Collegiate Athletic Association and the Atlantic Coast Con- 
ference. Rules and regulations of the NCAA and the ACC apply 
to all intercollegiate sports and eligibility of players. Represen- 
tative teams participate in a full schedule of the following var- 
sity sports: football, basketball, baseball, track and field, cross 
country, swimming, golf, and tennis. Varsity teams have always 
acquitted themselves well, but perhaps golf has been the sport 
which has brought the most recognition. 

In order to provide for this program for all students, excellent 
indoor and outdoor facilities are provided. The focal point for 
sports and athletics is the William N. Reynolds Gymnasium: 
four gymnasiums with eight basketball courts, eight handball 
and squash courts, gymnastic and wrestling room, weight train- 

70 



Athletic Awards 



ing room, dance studio, rifle range, table tennis area, and a fully 
equipped check-out cage where students may check out a wide 
variety of sports and recreation equipment are available. Out- 
door facilities include three batteries of all-weather tennis courts 
totaling 16, quarter mile running track and infield, four football 
fields, five intramural fields, golf putting green, and two base- 
ball fields. 

Research in fitness and motor skills is carried on in three lab- 
oratories located in the gymnasium: the Physical Fitness Lab- 
oratory, Body Composition Laboratory, and the Motor Per- 
formance Laboratory. 

Athletics 

The University participates in the following eight sports: 
baseball, basketball, cross country, football, golf, swimming, 
tennis, and track. Scholarships are offered in each sport, partial 
as well as full. The full scholarship allowed by the National 
Collegiate Athletic Association is tuition, fees, room, board, 
books and $15.00 a month incidental expenses. The University 
also offers a club program in riflery, soccer, and gymnastics and 
offers a very extensive intramural program in a large number of 
other men's and women's sports. 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

The Director of Athletics has general supervision of intercol- 
legiate athletic activities. 

The University is a member of the National Collegiate 
Athletic Association and the Atlantic Coast Conference. Rules 
and Regulations of the NCAA, of the Conference, and of the 
University apply to all intercollegiate sports and eligibility of 
players. 

The Brian Piccolo Award 

This award is presented annually at the North Carolina-Wake 
Forest game to the Wake Forest player who, as judged by the 
Deacon coaching staff, best exemplifies the qualities and courage 
of the former Deacon star, Brian Piccolo, in the University of 
North Carolina game. 

71 



Navy ROTC 

The Brian Piccolo Scholarship 
Presented annually to a Chicago area high school player 
bound for Wake Forest. Selection is made by the coaching staff. 
They are invited by Chicago high school coaches and an attempt 
is made to select an individual who most closely exemplifies the 
spirit of Brian Piccolo. The current recipient is Mike Lavalee. 

The Arnold Palmer Award 
This award is presented annually by the Monogram Club to 
the Wake Forest Athlete of The Year. The recipient of the 
award is determined by a vote of the members of the Monogram 
Club. Trophies are also presented to the outstanding athlete in 
the eight varsity sports at a year-end All-Sports Banquet. 

The Buddy Worsham Memorial Scholarship 

Established by Arnold Palmer in memory of his college room- 
mate who was killed in an automobile accident. It has been 
awarded to a golfer for his four years at Wake Forest. Beginning 
in 1973, two golfers will be selected for the Buddy Worsham 
Scholarship. 

John R. Knott Scholarship 

This four year scholarship was established by alumnus John 
R. Knott of Charlotte, N. C. in 1968 to support the University 
Athletic Program. It was later restricted to golf, and since Mr. 
Knott's death in 1969, the value has increased sufficiently to 
include two golfers. Current golfers on the scholarship are Billy 
Chapman and Jay Haas. 

Navy ROC Program 

The United States Navy offers a Reserve Officer Candidate 
(ROC) program whereby a Wake Forest student may complete 
his military requirements for a commission as Ensign in the 
United States Naval Reserve by attending weekly drills (op- 
tional) at the Winston-Salem Naval Reserve Training Center, 
930 Brookstown Avenue, and by attending ROC schools during 
the summers following his junior and senior years (required). 
Further information is available through the Commanding Offi- 
cer of the Training Center or Dr. Carlton Mitchell of the Wake 
Forest faculty. 

72 



um«i| iiii MM« i UPi.,n«" i nwji 



BOSTWICK DORMI 




SERVICES 



73 



Orientation 



The Orientation and Advising Program 

The orientation program is planned to enable the new student 
to make a smooth adjustment to life at Wake Forest both 
academically and socially. To achieve this purpose, there is 
certain information which must be passed along to new students 
and certain information which must be obtained from them. A 
four-day orientation period is scheduled each fall immediately 
before registration to allow for the transfer of this information. 
During this period the students are given language placement 
and other tests; they meet with faculty and student advisors to 
learn about the academic requirements, the social life, and the 
cultural opportunities; and they learn about Wake Forest's past 
and present in both formal and informal meetings. 

Each new student is assigned to a faculty member who serves 
as his academic advisor and each advisor has approximately 30 
students — 15 freshmen and 15 sophomores who have been 
assigned to him at the beginning of their freshman year and con- 
tinue with him until they have completed the work of the 
sophomore year and have been assigned to major advisors. Al- 
though the primary duty of the advisor is to assist students in 
selecting courses to enable them to meet the basic academic re- 
quirements, a less tangible, but perhaps more important func- 
tion of the advisor is to provide general support for the student, 
not only in his academic program, but also in all matters per- 
taining to his general happiness and peace of mind. This does 
not require advisors to be professional counselors (for which 
they are not trained), but it does require that they have a 
genuine and personal interest in each of their students. An im- 
portant aspect of this is that the advisor convey this interest 
and concern to the student in such a way that he will believe it 
and will think of his advisor as the one to see when he needs 
support or help. 

The advisor has an essential role in the orientation program 
for new students, transfers as well as freshmen. (All transfer 
students are assigned to one or two advisors. ) The advisor meets 
with his new advisees as a group and individually, and most ad- 
visors also have their respective groups in their homes for supper 
and discussion during the orientation period. 

The advisor is present at registration to help his advisees 
select and enroll in the proper courses. The advisor indicates his 

74 



Housing 

approval of the student's courses by signing his schedule card. 
If a student is experiencing academic difficulty in any subject, he 
should consult with his advisor. There are any number of things 
the advisor may suggest to help in such a situation if he is 
aware of it. 

Housing 

All unmarried freshman students are required to live in Uni- 
versity residence halls except when permission is granted for 
freshman men by the Dean of Men and for freshman women by 
the Dean of Women to live off campus under one of the follow- 
ing circumstances: 

(1) Residing with parents; parental permission to live with a 
relative in the metropolitan area of Winston-Salem. 

(2) Student is twenty-one years of age or older. 

(3) By special arrangement, when space is not available in the 
residence halls. 

Housing for Men 

The semester charge for double occupancy is $180.00 per stu- 
dent, due and payable with tuition and non-deferrable. A very 
limited number of single rooms are available; an additional 
$45.00 is assessed for a single room. 

A double occupied as a single room is $260.00 per semester. 
When three persons occupy a room, the charge is $140.00 per 
person per semester. Room rent is not refunded upon withdrawal. 
Room assignments are made by the Director of Housing. 

The four men's residence halls are served by a residence hall 
staff of student assistants and professionally trained adults. The 
staff serves as advisors and counselors in areas of personal growth 
and development. Their work is coordinated by the Director of 
Men's Residence Life. The student staff reports to the Director 
and is responsible for the general well-being of students and 
some physical maintenance of the buildings. The residence staff 
helps in the general functioning of residence life with emphasis 
on total student development through interpersonal relationships 
in residence hall living. 

75 



Food Services 



Housing for Women 

The semester charges range from $180.00 to $225.00 per se- 
mester due and payable with tuition and may not be deferred. 
An additional $30.00 per semester is assessed for a single room; 
an additional $50.00 per semester is assessed for a double room 
to be occupied alone. Room rental is not refundable upon with- 
drawal. Room assignments are made by the Director of Housing. 

The women's residence halls are staffed by adult and student 
counselors under the supervision of the Dean of Women. The 
staff is concerned with personal and corporate development of 
the residents. Freshmen women observe curfew; sophomore 
women must have parental permission to determine their own 
curfew. 

Married women students are not ordinarily permitted to live 
in the residence halls. Exceptions are made by the Dean of 
Women. 

Housing Regulations 

Details of regulations and conditions governing occupancy of 
University housing are found in the Student Handbook. 

Housing for Married Students 

An apartment building containing 56 apartments is located on 
the north-west edge of the campus. A trailer park containing 50 
spaces is located on the east side of the campus. Apartments 
and trailer spaces are available only to bona fide students of 
Wake Forest University. 

Applications for either apartments or trailer spaces should be 
directed to the Director of Housing. Assignments are made on 
the basis of priorities established by the date of application, and 
a lease is executed by the student and the University. 

Food Services 

Four types of food service are available to students at Wake 
Forest University — cafeteria, grill, table service, and special 
dining service for small parties. The cafeteria menus feature 
multiple choices planned and supervised by a trained dietitian. 

76 



Reading Improvement 



Table service is provided in the Magnolia Room and gives the 
students a quiet place to enjoy eating from a menu of greater 
variety, as well as foods prepared to order. Buffets are served 
in the Magnolia Room each Wednesday noon and Thursday 
evening. 

University Health Service 

The University Health Service through the University Clinic 
and Hospital provide those services necessary to the student in 
maintenance of their health. Utilizing the required Pre-entrance 
Medical Report from the student's physician, the Health Service 
evaluates the student's health status prior to admission. Any 
Health problems present then or arising later are handled by the 
Health Service Staff so as to assure the student's continued 
education as far as possible without endangering his health or 
that of others. The facilities and staff of the Bowman Gray 
School of Medicine, The North Carolina Baptist Hospital, The 
Forsyth Memorial Hospital, and others are also used if needed. 
The Health Service also works closely with the Center for Psy- 
chological Services on mental health problems. 

In the clinic a minimum charge is made for medications and 
laboratory tests, but none for office visits. Charges are made for 
University Hospital in-patient care. When it becomes necessary 
to refer patients to specialists or for studies elsewhere all costs 
must be assumed by the student. 

North Carolina State Law states that "any minor age 18 years 
or older may contract for medical services for himself or his 
child." This means that all medical information and all contacts 
between the student and the Health Service are confidential and 
cannot be revealed to anyone, including parents and administra- 
tion, without the consent of the patient if he has reached 18 
years of age. 

Reading Improvement Program For University Students 

A reading improvement course is available on the Wake 
Forest University campus to all students. It is designed to help 
students read and study more effectively to achieve a greater 
measure of success in the many different areas of university 
work. Instruction centers around increasing the speed of com- 

77 



Human Enterprises Institute 



prehension and improving comprehension, vocabulary, and 
study skills. Group diagnostic tests are given to detennine 
specific weaknesses of students. The class meets twice each 
week (one hour periods) in the afternoons and is offered both 
semesters. The charge for the course is $65.00, which includes 
fees for materials and use of the reading machines. 

Center for Psychological Services 

The Center in Efird Hall serves students, faculty, and staff in 
many ways. For the student who wishes to maximize opportuni- 
ties for academic and professional development in college, the 
Center offers educational-vocational counseling. The profes- 
sionally trained staff provide individual and group therapy in a 
confidential setting. The Center also consults with individuals, 
groups and organizations with regard to study skills, motivation, 
leadership, and other areas in which the application of psy- 
chological principles are sought. The Center also conducts re- 
search, offers information concerning students' opinions, apti- 
tudes, and interests, and participates in the training of graduate 
students in the psychological disciplines. Services are free to 
currently enrolled students. 

Placement Office Services 

The Placement Office arranges on-campus career interviews 
with business firms, government agencies, school systems, and 
other organizations, for graduating students at Wake Forest 
University. Career information may be found in the Placement 
Office, Room 118, Reynolda Hall. The Placement Manager is 
available during regular office hours for consultation on career 
matters. 

Human Enterprises Institute 

The Human Enterprises Institute provides learning oppor- 
tunities for clergy of all religious groups to understand industry. 
Since its establishment in 1966, it has placed clergy in educa- 
tional centers operated by industry and in continuing educa- 
tion centers operated by universities for industry and has con- 
ducted summer programs for seminarians in industry. In addi- 
tion to consulting services, it also designs conferences for de- 

78 



Piedmont University Center 



nominational groups and seminaries. The Institute publishes a 
quarterly of reprints for clergy. 

Urban Affairs Institute 

The Wake Forest Urban Affairs Institute, established in 1968, 
serves as the means to channel the resources of the University 
into problem areas of the urban community. It also serves as a 
communications focal point for agencies and individuals outside 
the University. In the pursuit of its responsibilities the Institute 
engages in programs of education, research and community 
service utilizing the resources of both the faculty and student 
body. 

The Piedmont University Center 

In the early 1960's the late Charles H. Babcock and the 
Presidents of several area colleges took action which eventually 
led to the establishment of a cooperative educational agency 
among various colleges and universities in the Piedmont. Wake 
Forest was a charter member of this group which adopted the 
name, Piedmont University Center of North Carolina, Inc., and 
which coordinates many of the educational and administrative 
activities of its twenty-one members. 

The present membership includes nineteen private liberal arts 
colleges and universities and two branches of the University of 
North Carolina. Center headquarters is located at Reynolda 
House near the Wake Forest campus. 

The Center is owned by the member colleges which are rep- 
resented on the Board of Directors by the Presidents. The Cen- 
ter is headed by an Executive Director and his staff. Each of the 
many Center activities is coordinated by a Committee of rep- 
resentatives from the entire membership. Presently there are 
nine committees coordinating activities under the supervision 
of the Executive Director. 

Through programs of interinstitutional cooperation, the Cen- 
ter seeks to assist its member colleges to : ( 1 ) enrich and expand 
their educational program as provided by the Visiting Scholars 
Program and Student Art Exhibit and Competition; (2) in- 
crease the effectiveness of certain services, such as the Library 

79 



Ecumenical Institute 



and the audio-visual program, and (3) achieve greater economics 
in general business operations. 

The Institute of Literature 
Founded in 1964, the Institute of Literature is jointly spon- 
sored by the Departments of English, Classics, German, and 
Romance Languages. Its purpose is to promote the cause of 
humane letters and to manifest something of the diversity in 
unity which characterizes the literary heritage of the West. To 
achieve this purpose the Institute each year invites distinguished 
writers and scholars to the Wake Forest campus for extended 
visits. Institute lecturers have included such outstanding figures 
as W. H. Auden, Malcolm Cowley, James Dickey, and V. S. 
Pritchett (English); Gilbert Highet, Whitney Oates, Cedric 
Whitman, and John Finley (Classics); Germaine Bree, Henri 
Peyre, Morris Bishop, and Alfred D. Menut (Romance Lan- 
guages) ; Arthur Henkel, Taylor Starck, Erich Heller, and Victor 
Lange (German). 

The Robinson Lectures 
Samuel Robinson, the uncle of Mrs. George C. Mackie, wife 
of the late Dr. Mackie, who was a long-time physician to the 
University, endowed a portion of his trust to the Department of 
Religion. This fund is used to sponsor the Robinson Lectures 
and other activities of the Department. 

These lectures are held biennially and have resulted in the 
publication of a number of books. In addition, the funds from 
the trust are used to sponsor individual lectures which are given 
at more frequent intervals. 

Ecumenical Institute 
The Ecumenical Institute of Wake Forest University was es- 
tablished in 1968. Its purpose is to provide a means in an aca- 
demic setting for better understanding and wider experience in 
religion in a pluralistic society. The Institute is supported by 
donations from individuals and foundations. It sponsors con- 
ferences between various religious groups, both on and off the 
campus. Some of the funds have been used in publication, and a 
limited number of student Fellowships are available for pro- 
grams of study sponsored by the Institute. 

80 



Artists Series 



University Artists Series 

The University Artists Series presents a series of outstanding 
concerts to the University community. These are of such quality 
that they represent an extension of the Arts curriculum as well 
as entertainment for students and faculty. The Series brings 
artists who have reached the top of their fields as well as the 
most promising younger artists. Among the outstanding attrac- 
tions in recent years have been Leontyne Price, Yehudi Menu- 
hin, The Vienna Symphony, The Cleveland Orchestra, Marcel 
Marceau, Alicia de Larrocha, and other comparable artists. The 
Series is equally proud of the artists it has presented who have 
gone on to illustrious careers, such as Byron Janis, Phillipe 
Entremont, Janos Starker, Itzhak Perlman, John Ogdon, and 
others. The five concerts each season are chosen so that in the 
four years a student is at Wake Forest University he may attend 
concerts by a balanced range of artists. Concerts are presented 
in Wait Chapel Auditorium, and students are admitted without 
further charge upon presentation of the Wake Forest identifi- 
cation card. 



if 




81 




82 




Jsm***. 




83 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Academic Calendar 
The academic calendar of Wake Forest College includes a fall 
semester ending before Christmas, a spring semester beginning 
in January and ending in May, and a summer session. Courses 
offered in the fall semester normally meet for approximately fif- 
teen weeks. During the spring semester some courses meet on a 
fifteen-week schedule as in the fall, some meet for four weeks 
(normally during January), and others for the remaining eleven 
weeks of the semester. A student may enroll for fifteen-week 
courses (Track 1) only, for four- week and eleven-week courses 
(Track 2) only, or under certain conditions one may combine 
courses from the two tracks during the same spring semester. 
The University Calendar for 1974-75 appears in the first pages 
of this bulletin. 

Degree Credit 
Credit toward a degree is calculated not according to semester 
hours, but according to courses. Most subjects of study are di- 
vided into full courses. Certain studies and activities, however, 
will count as half-courses, either for one semester's work or for 
two. 

Normal Credit Load 
A student's normal credit load is nine courses a year or four 
and one-half courses each semester. Under unusual circumstances 
a student of demonstrated ability may be allowed a slightly 
heavier load. Three full courses per semester, the minimum regis- 
tration without special permission, constitute full-time status. 

Classification 
The requirements for classification after the freshman year 
are as follows: 

Sophomore — the removal of all entrance conditions and the 
completion of not fewer than seven courses toward a degree, 
with a minimum of 14 quality points; Junior — the completion 
of not fewer than 15 courses toward a degree, with a minimum 
of 30 quality points; Senior — not fewer than 26^2 courses 
toward a degree, with a minimum of 53 quality points. 

84 



Examinations and Grades 



Procedure in Registering 
There are five steps in registration: (1) securing from the 
Registrar's Office a permit to register and a summary of prior 
record; (2) the payment of fees to the Treasurer; (3) consul- 
tation with an adviser, who gives such assistance as may be 
necessary in regard to the program of work; (4) sectioning of 
classes by departmental representatives; (5) appearance before 
the Registrar for approval of program and assignment to classes. 

No student is allowed to enter any class until he has com- 
pleted his registration. 

Registration after the Freshman Year 

During each spring semester before an announced date (see 
Calendar) students who plan to return for the fall semester must 
make a reservation deposit. An undergraduate student who fails 
to pay the deposit at the required time is not eligible to register 
for the fall semester. 

Auditing of Classes 
A student regularly enrolled on a full-time basis may audit 
classes without charge, provided that the permission of the in- 
structor is obtained. A person other than a regularly enrolled 
full-time student may audit classes at a charge of $50.00 per 
course with the permission of the dean of the appropriate school 
and the instructor. An auditor is listed on the class roll as such 
and is subject to the usual attendance regulations and to what- 
ever additional requirements the instructor may impose. If 
these conditions are properly fulfilled, a notation "audit" is 
entered in lieu of a grade on the instructor's final grade report. 
For the regularly enrolled student, this notation is also entered 
on his permanent record card. An auditor may receive no grade 
or credit for the course. 

Each instructor shall report to the Registrar the presence of 
any student not registered regularly or as an auditor. 

An audit course may not be changed to a credit course, and 
a credit course may not be changed to an audit course. 

Examinations and Grades 
All examinations are conducted in accordance with the honor 
system adopted by the students and approved by the Faculty. 

85 



Pass-Fail Grades 



Under this system the student is expected not only to refrain 
from unfairness in any form but also to report to the Honor 
Council anyone whom he knows to be guilty of cheating. Exam- 
ination papers are accompanied by a signed statement that no 
aid has been given or received. 

Grades in each course are assigned by the instructor as 
follows: A, exceptionally high achievement; B, superior; C, satis- 
factory; D, passing but unsatisfactory; E, conditional failure; 
F, failure. 

Grades are assigned quality points as follows: for each full 
course of A, 4 points; of B, 3 points; of C, 2 points; of D, 1 point; 
and of E and F, no points. The quality point ratio is calculated 
by dividing the total number of quality points earned by the 
total number of courses attempted, whether passed or not. 

Grade of I 
The grade of I (incomplete) may be assigned only when 
on account of illness or some other emergency a student does 
not complete the work of his course. If the work recorded as I 
is not completed within thirty days after the student enters 
for his next semester, the grade automatically becomes F. 

Grade of E 
A student who makes a grade of E on any course may be 
re-examined at any regular examination period within a year, 
or during the first week of the fall semester. The re-examination 
permit is secured from the Registrar's Office a few days in 
advance. No grade higher than D may be assigned as a result 
of a re-examination. A student who does not remove a con- 
ditional failure by one re-examination must repeat the course 
to secure credit. 

Pass-Fail Grades 
A student during his junior and senior year is permitted to 
elect up to 4 full courses (but no more than one course in a 
given semester), with the stipulation that grades for these 
courses will be recorded as Pass (P) or Fail (F) only and that 
these grades will not be counted in computing the student's 
quality point ratio. A grade of Pass carries full academic credit; 

86 



Class Attendance 



a grade of Fail carries no academic credit. A student must indi- 
cate at the time of registration that he is choosing to take a 
course under this arrangement, and he may not change it to a 
letter-grade basis after the first two weeks of classes. In pre- 
paring his class roll the instructor will indicate which students 
are registered on a Pass-Fail basis. 

Courses selected for Pass-Fail grades must be other than 
those submitted by the student to satisfy the basic and divi- 
sional course requirements or courses in the student's major. 

(Courses offered only on a Pass-Fail basis are not, of course, 
subject to this restriction. Courses especially designed for the 
winter term, for example, are all graded Pass-Fail whether in 
the student's major field or not. ) 

Repetition of Courses 

A student may not repeat for credit a course on which he has 
already received a grade of C or higher. 

Class Attendance 

The attendance regulations specifically place the responsi- 
bility for class attendance upon the individual student. He is 
expected to attend classes regularly and punctually. A student 
should recognize that one of the most vital aspects of a resi- 
dential college experience is attendance in the classroom and 
that the value of this academic experience cannot be fully 
measured by testing procedures alone. 

The members of the student body are considered sufficiently 
mature to appreciate the necessity of regular attendance, to 
accept this personal responsibility, and to demonstrate the kind 
of self-discipline essential for such performance and, conversely, 
to recognize and accept the consequences of failure to attend. 
An instructor is privileged to refer to the Office of the Dean 
of the College for suitable action students who in his opinion 
are causing their work or that of the class to suffer because 
of absences or latenesses. Any student who does not attend 
classes regularly, or who demonstrates other evidence of aca- 
demic irresponsibility, is subject to such disciplinary action as 
the Executive Committee may prescribe, including immediate 
suspension from the College. 

87 



Dropping a Course 



The Office of the Dean of the College maintains a list of 
students who have been absent from class (1) because of illness 
(when certified by the University Health Service) or other 
extenuating circumstances or (2) as authorized representatives 
of the University (when their names have been submitted by 
appropriate University officials forty-eight hours in advance of 
the hour when the absences are to commence). Such absences 
are considered "excused," and a record of them is available to 
the student's instructors upon request. An instructor determines 
whether work the student has missed (including quizzes) may 
be made up. 

Enforcement of Regulations 

The enforcement of all regulations pertaining to academic 
matters is a function of the faculty, or representatives of the 
faculty. A well-organized Student Government assumes respon- 
sibility, in co-operation with the Office of the Dean, for the regu- 
lation of the honor system and various other matters involving 
personal conduct. In general, the regulations of the University 
are adapted to and intended for those who have reached such 
maturity that they may exercise self-control. All students are 
expected to be faithful in work, to be prompt and regular in 
attendance upon all their college duties, and to refrain from 
practices injurious to others. Those who neglect their work, or 
engage in conduct that brings reproach upon themselves and 
upon the University, or disregard the rights and the welfare 
of their students are required to withdraw from the University. 

Dropping a Course 

The last day for dropping a class without the grade of F is 
listed in the University calendar on page 4 of this Catalog. A 
student who wishes to drop any course before this date must 
consult the Registrar and his faculty adviser. After this date, 
if he wishes to drop a course, he must consult his faculty adviser, 
his instructor, and the Dean of the College. If the Dean approves 
the request, he authorizes the student to discontinue the course. 
Except in the case of an emergency, the grade in the course will 
be recorded as F. 

If, at any time, a student shall drop any course without 

88 



Minimum Academic Requirements 



prior, written approval of the Dean, a grade of F for that course 
shall be reported by the instructor to the Registrar, and the 
student will be subject to academic probation for the following 
semester or to such other penalties as the Executive Committee 
of the faculty may impose. 

Withdrawal from College 

A student who finds it necessary to withdraw from the College 
is required to do so through the Office of the Dean of the College. 
If in the judgment of the dean the withdrawal is justified and 
the student is otherwise in good academic standing, no grades 
will be recorded on the student's permanent record for that 
semester. However, the student's standing in his courses at the 
time of withdrawal will be taken into consideration should he 
at a later date seek readmission to the College. If the with- 
drawal is for academic reasons, failing grades may be assigned 
in all courses in which the student is not doing satisfactory work. 

If a student leaves the College without officially withdrawing, 
he will be assigned failing grades in all his current courses and 
his unofficial withdrawal will be indicated on his record. 

Minimum Academic Requirements for Continuation 

Each student is expected to be aware at all times of his 
academic status and to be responsible for knowing whether he 
has met the College's minimum academic requirements for 
continuation as outlined below. 

On the basis of their cumulative records at the end of the 
spring semester, the following students are academically in- 
eligible to enroll for the following fall term: 

(1) Those students who, having attempted 13 or fewer 
courses in all colleges attended, have an over-all quality 
point ratio* of less than 1.35 on work attempted at Wake 
Forest. 

(2) Those students who, having attempted no fewer than 
14 and no more than 24 courses in all colleges attended, have 
an over-all quality point ratio of less than 1.65 on work 
attempted at Wake Forest. 



* The quality point ratio is obtained by dividing the quality points earned by the number 
of courses attempted. 

89 



Requirements for Readmission 



(3) Those students who, having attempted no fewer than 
25 and no more than 33 courses in all colleges attended, have 
an over-all quality point ratio of less than 1.85 on work at- 
tempted at Wake Forest. 

(4) Those students who, having attempted 34 or more 
courses in all colleges attended, have an over-all quality point 
ratio of less than 1.90 on work attempted at Wake Forest. 

In the determination of quality point ratio, non-credit courses 
are not counted. 

Ordinarily a student who is ineligible under the minimum 
requirements above may attend the first summer term at Wake 
Forest; if he is successful in raising his over-all quality point 
ratio on work attempted at Wake Forest to the required mini- 
mum, he may enroll for the fall semester. If he is unsuccessful 
by the end of the first summer term, he may attend the second 
term in Wake Forest; if he is successful then in raising his 
quality point ratio to the required minimum, he may apply 
for readmission no earlier than for the following spring semester. 
If he is unsuccessful in meeting the minimum requirements by 
the end of the second summer term, he may apply for read- 
mission no earlier than for the following summer session. 

Requirements for continuation are to be determined by the 
catalog under which the student expects to be graduated. 

Under exceptionally extenuating circumstances beyond the 
control of the student, and after consultation with the student's 
dean, an appeal from the foregoing eligibility requirements may 
be considered by the Executive Committee of the faculty. 

The Executive Committee of the faculty may also suspend 
from college at the end of any term any student whose record 
for that term has been unsatisfactory, particularly with regard 
to the number of courses passed and failed, or who has not 
attended class regularly or has otherwise ignored the rules and 
regulations of the College. 

Requirements for Readmission 

Any student seeking readmission to Wake Forest University 
must meet the minimum academic requirements for contin- 

90 



Senior Conditions 



uation for students in his category of courses attempted (see 
page 89), except that: 

(1) a student who has not met these requirements may 
apply for admission to the summer school only; 

(2) a student may apply for readmission if he has been 
away from Wake Forest continuously for at least a year and 
a half and has spent that time constructively; 

(3) a student may apply for readmission after less than the 
year and a half if he has been enrolled in another college or 
if his failure to have the required average at the time of 
his suspension was due to exceptionally extenuating circum- 
stances beyond his control. 

It should be understood by the student and his parents that 
meeting the requirements set forth above does not insure that 
the student will be readmitted to the University. 

Probation 

A student is responsible at all times for knowing his academic 
standing. 

Any student who at the end of the fall semester does not 
have the grade average which he will be required to have at 
the end of the spring semester will be automatically on academic 
probation. 

Any student who is placed on probation because of honor 
code or conduct code violations shall also be placed on such 
special academic probation as the Executive Committee of 
the faculty shall impose. In addition, the Executive Committee 
may at any time place on probation any student whose academic 
performance or social behavior is inconsistent with what the 
Committee deems to be the best interests of the student or the 
University. 

Senior Conditions 

A candidate for graduation in his final semester who receives 
a grade of E at the close of the previous semester may apply 
to the Registrar for re-examination 30 days after the opening 
of the final semester and not less than 30 days before its close. 

91 



Graduation Distinctions 



All conditions must be removed 30 days before the end of 
the last term of the student's graduation year. The name of a 
candidate for graduation who has a condition after that date 
is dropped from the roll of the class. 

If a student receives a grade of E in a course in the final term 
of his graduation year, he is not allowed a re-examination before 
the next examination period. 

Reports 

A mid-term report is given to the student and a copy is sent 
to the parent or guardian of each student who is doing unsatis- 
factory work. At the end of each term a final report of grades 
is given to the student, and a copy is sent to the parent or 
guardian. 

Transcripts of Student Records 

The first copy of a student's record is issued without charge. 
Requests for subsequent copies should be made to the Registrar, 
and should be accompanied by a remittance of one dollar for 
each, copy desired. No transcript will be issued without the 
authorization of the owner of the record. 

The Dean's List 

The Dean's List, issued at the end of each semester by the 
Dean of the College, includes all full-time students who have 
made a quality point ratio of 3.0 for the semester and have 
earned no grade below the level of C. Grades earned during a 
summer session are not considered in the preparation of the list. 

Graduation Distinctions 

Under the quality point system, graduation distinctions are 
determined as follows: 

A candidate for a baccalaureate degree who is credited with 
quality points which give him a ratio of not less than 3.80, 
in relation to the total number of courses attempted, shall be 
graduated with the distinction summa cum laude; not less than 
3.50, magna cum laude; not less than 3.00, cum laude. The 
entire record of a student is considered, with the understanding 

92 



Departmental Honors 



that a transfer student may receive no distinction which requires 
a quality point ratio greater than that earned in Wake Forest 
University. 

Interdisciplinary Honors Program 
Wake Forest University offers an interdisciplinary honors 
program for a limited number of highly qualified students. 
Participation is with the approval of the Faculty Committee 
on Honors. 

During their first three years in college, participants will 
usually schedule three interdisciplinary honors seminars (nor- 
mally including two courses in the Lower Division and one 
course in the Upper Division). Many students will probably 
not participate formally in the interdisciplinary program 
beyond the third year, but will choose instead to concen- 
trate on departmental honors work in their major fields. Stu- 
dents, however, who are not candidates for departmental honors 
and who have completed four interdisciplinary seminars with a 
superior record may elect Honors 281 (directed study culmi- 
nating in an honors paper and an oral examination). Those 
whose work in this course is superior and who have achieved 
an over-all quality point ratio of at least 3.0 in all college work 
will be graduated "with Honors in the Arts and Sciences." 
Those students, on the other hand, who have chosen to be 
candidates for departmental honors may not also be candidates 
for "Honors in the Arts and Sciences." 

Departmental Honors 

Many, departments offer specialized honors programs for high- 
ly qualified majors. Admission to an honors program is by ap- 
plication to and with the consent of the department. The mini- 
mum requirement is a grade point average of not less than 3.0 
on all college work and 3.3 on all work in the major. 

Beyond these stipulations, a department may at its discretion 
impose such additional requirements as the completion of spe- 
cific courses, the honors seminars, an independent study project, 
or honors research and a comprehensive examination on the 
special project. The specific requirements of each department are 
listed with the course requirements for the major. 

93 



Wake Forest-in- Venice 



Wake Forest University Semester in France 

The department of Romance Languages sponsors a Semester 
in France program at Dijon, the site of a well-established French 
university. Students are placed in courses according to level of 
ability in French, as ascertained by a test given at Dijon. The 
minimum requirement is at least one French course beyond the 
intermediate level, preferably French 221 or its equivalent. The 
list of courses, which are taught by native French professors, 
may be found under the Romance Languages course listings. 

The Asian Studies Program Semester in India 

The Asian Studies Program conducts a Semester in India 
Program under which a selected group of students spends three 
months doing academic work at an Indian college and travel 
in India as a part of the total curriculum. A student who wishes 
to use one or more of these courses to meet basic, divisional, or 
major requirements must obtain written approval of each 
course. When possible, this should be done before enrolling in 
the overseas program. Further information on this may be ob- 
tained from the Director of the Asian Studies Program. 

Wake Forest University in Spain 

The department of Romance Languages sponsors a study 
abroad program conducted at the University of Madrid. 

Students live with Spanish families selected by the program's 
resident director or a professor of Spanish from Wake Forest. 
The courses are taught by native Spanish professors attached to 
the University's Facultad de Filosofid y Letras, the Spanish 
equivalent of the college of arts and sciences. 

Course offerings and specific requirements for eligibility are 
listed under the Spanish section of the Romance Language De- 
partment in the catalog. 

Wake Forest-in- Venice Program 

Since 1971 the University has conducted a Wake Forest-in- 
Venice program that permits approximately twenty students 
each semester to study in Venice. Students are housed in a 
large, comfortable building on the Grand Canal near St. Mark's 

94 



Experiment in International Living 



Square, and pursue their course of study under the direction of 
a regular member of the Wake Forest Faculty. The program 
offered there varies from time to time and is supervised on a 
rotating basis by several academic departments. A student in the 
program will have an opportunity to enroll for four semester 
courses and should be able to make normal progress toward 
meeting degree requirements. A student who wishes to use one 
or more of these courses to meet basic, divisional, or major re- 
quirements must obtain written approval for each course. When 
possible, this should be done before enrolling in the overseas 
program. Further information about the program may be ob- 
tained from the office of the Dean of the College. 

Study Abroad 

To be granted the privilege of studying abroad a student 
who plans to return to Wake Forest must plan a program of 
study relevant to his degree program at the University and 
must secure in advance the approval of the chairman of his 
major department and the Dean of the College. He must then 
file an approved Study Abroad Application with the Registrar. 

Maximum credit for a full year program (nine courses) may 
be granted upon evidence of a satisfactory evaluation by the 
University of the work taken. 

Students are encouraged to study under one of the established 
programs sponsored by American colleges and universities. In 
some cases independent study at foreign universities may be 
approved. A transcript of the record is required for posting 
after completion of approved foreign study. 

Experiment in International Living 

The Independent Study Program of The Experiment in 
International Living, Putney, Vermont, 05346, is recognized by 
the University. This is a semester program, available in any 
one of several countries either semester. To participate in this 
program, a student must be a regularly enrolled student plan- 
ning to return to the University upon completion of the semester 
abroad. The program of study must be approved in advance by 
the chairman of the student's major department, the chairman 
of such other departments as may be involved and the Dean. 

95 



Summer Session Elsewhere 



The program carries a maximum credit of three or four courses 
upon satisfactory completion, subject to evaluation by the Wake 
Forest Faculty. 

COURSES AT SALEM COLLEGE 

Wake Forest University and Salem College participate in a 
plan of exchange credits whereby courses offered at Salem and 
not offered at Wake Forest are available to full-time students 
regularly enrolled at Wake Forest. The same privilege is ex- 
tended by Wake Forest to full-time Salem students. 

A Wake Forest student interested in taking a course at 
Salem must make formal application in advance, and the appli- 
cation must be approved by his faculty adviser and by the Dean 
of the College. No financial payment is necessary except in 
certain courses in which the student receives private instruction. 
Grades and quality points earned in courses at Salem are 
evaluated in the same way as they would be if the work were 
taken at Wake Forest. 

More detailed information about this plan is available in 
the offices of the Registrar and the Dean of the College. The 
plan is effective only during the regular academic year and not 
during any summer session. 

Summer Session Elsewhere 

A student who desires to attend summer session in another 
college must secure in advance the approval of the Registrar and 
the chairman of the department concerned. 

A transcript of the record is required for posting at the close 
of the summer session. 

Grades received elsewhere are not used in computing a stu- 
dent's grade average at Wake Forest. All academic work com- 
pleted on the semester hour plan at other colleges or universities 
will be converted to Wake Forest course credit on the basis that 
3 semester hours equal three-fourths course. 



96 




REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

97 



ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

The degrees conferred are Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of 
Science, Master of Arts, Master of Business Administration and 
Master of Management, Juris Doctor, Doctor of Philosophy; 
and Doctor of Medicine, Master of Science and Doctor of Phi- 
losophy in the Bowman Gray School of Medicine. 

The basic and divisional requirements for the Bachelor of 
Arts and the Bachelor of Science degrees are the same. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred only upon those 
students who (1) complete a major in Accountancy, Business, 
Chemistry*, Mathematics, Physical Education, Physics, or 
Education with State teacher's certification in Science; (2) 
complete the degree requirements in Medical Sciences, Medical 
Technology, or the Physician Assistant Program; or (3) com- 
plete the requirements for the combined degree in Dentistry, 
Engineering, or Forestry. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred upon those stu- 
dents who (1) complete a major in Biology, Chemistry*, Clas- 
sical Languages, Economics, English, German, History, Music, 
Philosophy, Politics, Psychology, Religion, Romance Languages, 
Sociology and Anthropology, or Speech Communication and 
Theatre Arts. 

Each student is responsible for acquainting himself with the 
requirements for graduation, and for meeting the requirements 
as stated. 

A student who has been graduated from Wake Forest Uni- 
versity with the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of 
Science may not thereafter receive the other of these two 
degrees. 

The Undergraduate Curriculum 

The undergraduate curriculum offers students considerable 
latitude in planning the first two years of their college work. 



* Under certain conditions, a student majoring in Chemistry may receive either a B.S. 
or a B.A. degree. For details, see the introduction to course offerings in Chemistry. 

98 



Academic Requirements 



Apart from a year of physical education, only three specific 
courses are required — one in English Composition and two in 
a foreign language. Even these may sometimes be waived under 
certain conditions. To round out their preparation for more spe- 
cialized work in a major field, students select three courses in 
each of four divisions: I. Language, Literature, and the Arts; II. 
Natural Sciences and Mathematics; III. History, Religion, and 
Philosophy; and IV. Social and Behavioral Sciences. By the 
spring of the sophomore year students should have decided on 
a major field of concentration. Ordinarily a large part of the 
work of the junior and senior years is devoted to the major field. 

Four-Week Courses 

The faculty of the College decided in 1973 not to retain the 
4-1-4 calendar with its separate winter term. The two-track 
schedule of the spring semester, however, still makes it possible 
for those students and professors who wish to do so to engage in 
non-traditional study for four weeks of the spring term. Under 
this plan a number of courses may be offered off-campus in this 
country or abroad, serious individual-study projects may be 
pursued, or a member of the faculty and a group of students 
may, while remaining on campus, devote all their time for four 
weeks to a single topic of study. Such four-week courses are 
graded as the instructor decides; that is, there may be letter 
grades only, Pass-Fail grades only, or students may be granted, 
at the time of registration, a choice between the two grading 
systems. 

Academic Requirements 

For the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science 
the student must complete (1) the basic and divisional course 
requirements, (2) a course of study approved by his major 
department, and (3) elective courses to make a total of 35*4 
courses. No more than seven half-courses, and no more than 
three courses of the winter-term type may be used toward satis- 
fying the requirements for graduation. 

In addition to the above requirements for graduation, the 
student must earn a C average on all full courses attempted and 

99 



Basic Course Requirements 



a C average on all courses attempted, whether full or half- 
courses. 

A student who transfers from another institution or takes 
any work in other institutions must earn a C average on all full 
courses attempted in Wake Forest College, a C average on all 
work (full and half -courses combined) attempted at Wake 
Forest, and a C average on all work attempted at all colleges. 

Of the 35^ courses required for graduation, 17 must be 
completed in Wake Forest College, including the work of the 
senior year. An exception to this rule is made in the case of 
combined degrees. 

A student has the privilege of graduating under the require- 
ments of the catalog under which he enters provided that he 
completes his course within six years. After the interval of six 
years he is expected to conform to the requirements specified 
for the class with which he is graduated. 

Basic Course Requirements 

All students enrolled in Wake Forest College must complete 
three required basic courses. However, any or all of these courses 
may be waived through procedures established by the depart- 
ments concerned. In case of such waivers, no substitutes are 
required. The courses are: 

English 110 (English Composition) 
Foreign Language 153 (Intermediate)* 
Foreign Language (Literature) [one course] 

French or Spanish 215 or 216 

Russian 215 or 218 

German 211 or 212 

Greek 211 

Latin 211, 212, or 216 

Hebrew 211 

Hindi 211 



* No student may repeat for credit language courses equivalent to those which 
he had in high school unless, after taking the language placement test, he is given per- 
mission to do so by his advisor and by a committee composed of one faculty member from 
each of the three language departments. If a student begins a foreign language in college, 
he receives elective credit for the first year. 

100 



Divisional Course Requirements 



Divisional Course Requirements 

All students are required to select 3 courses from each of 4 
major divisions of the curriculum, as follows (except that quali- 
fied applicants for "Advanced Placement" may be exempt from 
these courses and may under certain conditions receive college 
credit for them without being required to make substitutions) : 

I. Language, Literature, and the Arts: 3 courses to be chosen from 
among the following: (No more than one may be chosen from each 

category.) 

1. English Literature 
English 160 or 165 

2. American Literature 
English 170 or 175 

3. Foreign Literature II (The same course may not be used to 
satisfy both the divisional and basic course requirements.) 

a. Classical Languages 
Greek 212 or 231 

Latin 212, 216, 221, 225 or 226 
Classics 253, 254, 263, 264, 265, or 272 

b. German 211 or 212 

c. Romance Languages 

French or Spanish 215 or 216, or any course in French or 

Spanish above 224 
Russian 217 

d. Humanities 213, 214, 215 or 216 

4. Fine Arts 
Humanities 111 

II. Natural Sciences and Mathematics: 3 courses to be chosen from 
among the following (The 3 courses are to be selected from only 
2 departments.) 

1. Biology 

Biology 111, 112, 151, 152 [If one course, either Biology 111 or 
151; if two courses, either Biology 111-112 or Biology 151-152.] 

2. Chemistry 

Chemistry 111, 112 [If the student has had no chemistry; other 
courses for those with advance preparation.] 

3. Physics 

Physics 111, 112 (1 or both courses) 

4. Mathematics 

Mathematics 111, 112, 115, 116, 157. [If one course only, may be 
any one of the five. If two, may be any of these three pairs: 
111-2, 115-6, 111-157.] 

101 



Completion of Course Requirements 



III. History, Religion, and Philosophy: 3 courses (No more than one 
to be chosen from each category.) 

1. History [Any one course] 

History 111, 112, 113, 215, 216, 315, 341, 342, 345, 346, 349, 350 

2. Religion [Any one course] 

Any course except 237, 240, 281, 282, 292, 318, 346, 362, 378 

3. Philosophy [Any one course] 
Philosophy 151, 171, 172 

IV. Economics, Politics, Psychology, Sociology, and Anthropology: 3 
courses to be chosen from among the following (No more than 2 
may be selected from any one department) 

• 1. Economics 

Economics 111, 151, 152 [If one course only, Economics 111 or 
151. If two courses, Economics 151-152; however, Economics 
111 and any other Economics course may be taken by per- 
mission of the department.] 

2. Politics 

Politics 111, 112, 113 [If one course only, any of those listed. 
If 2 courses, any 2 listed or one of those listed and any other 
in the department.] 

3. Psychology 

Psychology 151 [Required as first course. If a second course, 
normally from among: Psychology 266, 273, 344, 362. But, 
under special circumstances, second course may be chosen from 
among 321, 323, 331, 332, 338, 352, 356.] 

4. Sociology and Anthropology 

Sociology 151 or Anthropology 162 [Required as first course. If 
two courses are chosen: a) after Sociology 151, either An- 
thropology 162 or any other Sociology course except 371 and 
380; b) after Anthropology 162, either Sociology 151 or any 
300-level Anthropology course.] 

5. Speech Communication and Theater Arts 

Speech Communication and Theater Arts 153 [If this course is 
selected, the other two courses in Division IV must be intro- 
ductory level courses in two of the other departments in this 
area.] 

Physical Education Requirement 
All students must complete one half -course (two semesters) 
in Physical Education — Course 111-112. 

Completion of Course Requirements 
The basic and divisional course requirements, along with the 
Physical Education requirement, are to be completed, where 
possible, by the end of the sophomore year. Some students will 
find it necessary to postpone some of these requirements until 
the junior year in order to begin certain courses essential to 

102 



Upper Division 



the major field; but a minimum of three full courses from among 
the requirements must appear on the student's program each 
semester until such requirements have been met. 

No course requirements may be set aside or replaced by 
substitutes except through regular procedures already estab- 
lished by the faculty, or through a specific vote of the faculty 
in regular session. An important exception to this rule is des- 
cribed below. 

The Open Curriculum 
The Open Curriculum is an experimental program that gives 
a limited number of freshmen the opportunity to design their 
own program of study under faculty supervision. A student in 
the Open Curriculum may enroll in some basic and divisional 
courses but by-pass others. If his qualifications are adequate, 
he may proceed at once to some of the more advanced courses. 
The Open Curriculum is administered by a Faculty committee 
under the basic principle that a liberal education entails work 
in a number of areas representing the humanities, the natural 
sciences, and the social sciences. 

Admission to the Upper Division 
The work in the lower division, as specified in the preceding 
pages of this section, is intended to give the student an intro- 
duction to the various fields of knowledge and to lay the founda- 
tion for concentration in a major subject and related fields 
during the junior and senior years. 

Before applying for admission to the upper division and be- 
ginning work on the major subject, a student should have 17 
courses and 34 quality points in the lower division. In no case 
will a student be admitted to the upper division with fewer than 
15 courses and 30 quality points. 

All students at the end of the sophomore year or at the be- 
ginning of the junior year are required to pass a proficiency test 
in the use of the English language. 

Course of Study for the Upper Division 
Thirty days before the end of his sophomore year each stu- 
dent is required to indicate to the Registrar and to the depart- 
ment concerned his selection of a major subject in which he 
wishes to concentrate during his junior and senior years. Before 

103 



Maximum Number of Courses 



this selection is formally approved by the Registrar, however, 
the student must present to him a written statement from the 
authorized representative of the department in which he wishes 
to major that he has received the permission of that department. 
The student will also at this time be assigned a specific adviser 
from the department to assist him in planning his work for the 
junior and senior years. 

A department which rejects a student as a major will file 
with the Dean of the College a written statement including the 
reason (s) for the rejection. 

After the beginning of the junior year a student may not 
change from one major to another without the approval of the 
departments concerned. 

The student's course of study for the junior and senior years 
includes the minimum requirements for the departmental major, 
together with such other courses as he shall select and his 
adviser shall approve. 

For specific course requirements in the various fields of study, 
consult the introductory statements for each department in 
the section of the catalog where course offerings are listed. 

At least half of the major must be completed in Wake Forest 
College. 

Students preparing for the ministry are advised to elect three 
courses in religion beyond the course included in the divisional 
requirements. 

Fields of Study 

The following fields of study are recognized: Accountancy, 
Anthropology, Biology, Business, Chemistry, Economics, Edu- 
cation, English, French, German, Greek, History, Latin, Mathe- 
matics, Music, Philosophy, Physical Education, Physics, Politics, 
Psychology, Religion, Sociology, Spanish, and Speech Com- 
munication and Theatre Arts. 

Maximum Number of Courses in a Department 

A maximum of ten (10) semester courses and two (2) winter- 
term courses in a single field of study (as in the paragraph 

*These provisions are subject to revision in 1974. Consult Registrar or Dean of the 
College for details. 

104 



Senior Testing Program 



above) are allowed within the thirty-five and one-half (35^) 
courses required for graduation. [This means that a student may 
apply as many as 10 semester courses from one department to- 
ward the 35Y 2 "courses" for graduation. This excludes required 
related semester courses from other departments.] Students 
majoring in music may include 11 semester courses rather than 
10. 

For Dual-Major departments, twelve (12) semester courses 
and two (2) winter- term courses are allowed in any department 
authorized to offer two fields of study. Elementary foreign 
language in the major field of study and Accounting 111-112 
are excluded. 

These limits of ten (10) and twelve (12) courses may only be 
exceeded in unusual circumstances by action of the Dean of 
the College. 

Majors in Two Departments 

A student may elect to major in two separate departments 
with the written permission of the chairman of each of the 
departments and on condition that the student meet all re- 
quirements for the major in the respective departments. For 
administrative purposes, the student must designate one of 
the two fields as his primary major; this major will appear first 
on the student's record. 

Senior Testing Program 

All seniors are required to participate in a testing program 
designed to provide objective evidence of educational develop- 
ment while in college. The program will employ measures of 
academic achievement such as selected portions of the Graduate 
Record Examination and/or other tests deemed appropriate 
by the Executive Committee of the faculty. The tests are given 
in late spring, and relevant results are made available to the 
student for his information. The primary purpose of the pro- 
gram, however, is to provide the college with information that 
will facilitate the assessment of the total educational process. 
(This program does not supplant the regular administrations 
of the Graduate Record Examination for those students apply- 
ing for admission to graduate schools. ) 

105 



COMBINED DEGREES 

Degrees in the School of Law 

A combined course makes it possible for a student in Wake 
Forest University to receive the two degrees of Bachelor of Arts 
and Juris Doctor in six academic years or their equivalent 
instead of the seven years required if the two curricula are 
pursued independently. The first three years of the combined 
course are in Wake Forest College and the last three are in the 
School of Law. 

A student pursuing this plan must fulfill the following re- 
quirements: 

1. Complete the basic and divisional course requirements of 
Wake Forest College (see p. 100) and become qualified 
for admission to the upper division. 

2. Initiate an application for admission to the School of 
Law, and secure through the Law School Adviser, who 
is a member of the Law faculty, permission to pursue the 
combined course plan. (Admission to the School of Law 
is based on the applicant's entire undergraduate record, 
Law School Admission Test scores, and other criteria. 
Therefore, permission to pursue the combined degree 
program does not constitute admission to the School of 
Law.) 

3. Perform the junior year of study in Wake Forest College 
under the supervision of the Law School Adviser. 

4. Complete at least 27 courses in Wake Forest College (in- 
cluding two courses taken in winter terms, one of which 
must be designed for the winter term) with a minimum 
average of C and the first full year of Law in the School 
of Law with an average sufficient for him to remain in the 
School of Law. 

The last year of the required college academic work must be 
taken at Wake Forest College. A student who transfers from 
another institution at the end of his first or second year must 
maintain a minimum average grade of C on all academic work 
undertaken during his residence at Wake Forest College. 

106 



Medical Sciences 



A student who completes this program successfully will be 
eligible to receive the Bachelor of Arts degree at the end of the 
first full year in the School of Law. The Juris Doctor degree 
will be awarded the student who, having received the B. A. 
degree, also fulfills requirements for the J. D. degree as de- 
scribed on page 199. 

The quantitative and qualitative academic requirements set 
forth herein are minimum requirements for the successful com- 
pletion of the combined degree program. Satisfying the require- 
ments of the three-year program in the College does not neces- 
sarily entitle an applicant to admission to the School of Law. 
Admission requirements for the School of Law are given in detail 
on page 197 and in the Bulletin of the School of Law. 

Degrees in Medical Sciences 

A limited number of students, by taking advantage of the 
special arrangement explained here, may receive the B.S. degree 
with a major in Medical Sciences. 

Under this plan the student fulfills the requirements for the 
degree by completing three years of work in Wake Forest Col- 
lege with a minimum average grade of C, and by satisfac- 
torily completing the first full year of Medicine (at least 30 
semester hours) as outlined by the faculty of the Bowman 
Gray School of Medicine, with a record entitling him to promo- 
tion to the Second Year Class. At least one year (9 courses) 
of the required academic work must be completed in Wake 
Forest College. 

Candidates for the B.S. degree with a major in Medical 
Sciences must complete the following courses in Wake Forest 
College before entering the School of Medicine for their fourth 
year of work:* 

The basic course requirements listed on page 100. 

The divisional course requirements in Division I, III, and IV 

(see pages 101-102). 

The physical education requirement (see page 102). 
Biology 111, 112 or 151, 152 (2 courses) 



See the special bulletin of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine for further information. 

107 



Medical Technology 



Biology (2 courses) selected from the following: 312, 320, 
321, 326, 351, 360, 370 

Chemistry 111, 112 (2 courses) 
Chemistry 221, 222 (2 courses) 
Physics 111, 112 (2 courses) 
Mathematics (1 course) 
Electives (to make a total of 27 courses) 

The completion of the prescribed academic subjects does 
not necessarily admit any student to the School of Medicine. 
All other factors being equal, applicants who have done all their 
college work in Wake Forest College are given preference. 

Degree in Medical Technology 

Students may qualify for the Bachelor of Science degree in 
Medical Technology by completion of the academic require- 
ments outlined below and by satisfactory completion of the full 
program in Medical Technology offered by the Division of Allied 
Health Programs of Bowman Gray School of Medicine with at 
least a grade of C in all courses taken in the program of Medical 
Technology. At least one year (nine courses) of the required 
academic work must be completed in Wake Forest College. Stu- 
dents seeking admission to the program must file application in 
the fall of their junior year with the Division of Allied Health 
Programs of Bowman Gray School of Medicine, t 

A B average is usually required in Biology and Chemistry for 
admission to the program. 

The basic course requirements listed on page 100. 

The divisional course requirements in Division I, HI, and IV 
(see pages 101-102). 

The physical education requirement (see page 102). 

Biology 111 (1 course) 

Biology 151, 152 (2 courses) 

Biology 326 (1 course) 

Chemistry 111, 112 (2 courses) 

Chemistry 221, 222 (2 courses) 

Mathematics (1 course) 

Electives (to make a total of 27 courses) 

t For further information write to the Division of Allied Health Programs of the Bowman 
Gray School of Medicine. 

108 



Microbiology 



Degrees in the Physician Assistant Program 

Students may qualify for the Bachelor of Science degree in 
the Physician Assistant Program by completion of three years 
(27 courses) in college with a minimum average grade of C and 
by satisfactory completion of the full 24-months course in the 
Physician Assistant Program offered by the Division of Allied 
Health Programs of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine. At 
least one year (9 courses) of the required academic work must 
be completed in Wake Forest College. Candidates for the degree 
must complete the basic course requirements, the divisional 
course requirements, and the physical education requirement, 
as outlined on pages 100-102 of this catalog. They must take at 
least 4 lecture-and-laboratory courses in biology, including one 
course in microbiology, and at least 4 courses in the social 
sciences (sociology, psychology, and economics are recom- 
mended). A course in statistics and 1 or 2 courses in chemistry 
and physics are also recommended. 

Degree in Microbiology 

Students may qualify for the Bachelor of Science degree in 
Microbiology by completion of three years (27 courses) in 
college with a minimum average grade of C and by satisfactory 
completion of a 3 2 -hour major in Microbiology at the Bowman 
Gray School of Medicine. At least one year (9 courses) of the 
required academic work must be completed in Wake Forest 
College. Candidates for the degree must complete the basic 
course requirements, the divisional course requirements, and the 
physical education requirement as outlined on pages 100-102 of 
this catalog. 

The major in Microbiology must include Microbiology 301, 
302, 308, 311, and 312 and Biology 370. In some cases Biology 
326 may be substituted for Microbiology 301. Two additional 
courses must be chosen from among: Microbiology 309, 310, 
313, and 314 and Biology 321. Required related courses are 2 
courses in Physics and at least 2 courses in Organic Chemistry. 
Additional chemistry and mathematics courses may be sug- 
gested by the major adviser for students progressing towards 
advanced work in Microbiology. 

109 



Engineering 

For further information about the Department of Micro- 
biology, see the Bulletin of the Graduate School. 

Degree With Major in Dentistry 

A student may fulfill the requirements for a B.S. degree with 
a major in Dentistry by completing three years of work in Wake 
Forest College with a minimum average grade of C, and by satis- 
factorily completing the first two years of work in one of certain 
approved dental schools designated by Wake Forest University, 
with a record entitling him to advancement to the Third Year 
Class. 

For this degree the requirements in Wake Forest College are 
the same as outlined above for the B.S. degree with a major in 
Medical Sciences. 

Degrees in Engineering 
The 3-2 Engineering Program 

Wake Forest University now cooperates with North Carolina 
State University in offering a broad course of study in the arts 
and sciences combined with specialized training in engineering. 

The program, for outstanding students, covers five years of 
study including three initial years on the campus of Wake 
Forest University and two full years of technical training in one 
of the fields of engineering. Depending upon the field chosen, 
it may be necessary for a student to take an additional summer's 
work in engineering. 

Upon successful completion of the five years of study the 
student will receive the degree of Bachelor of Science from 
Wake Forest University and the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in one of the specialized engineering fields from North Carolina 
State University. 

By obtaining the first degree from Wake Forest University 
and the second from an engineering college, the graduate will 
be well suited for positions of higher responsibility where public 
relations and technical knowledge are combined. This combina- 
tion plan is recognized by nationally known educators as a wise 
program in allowing the student a broad background in the 
liberal arts in addition to the specialized and technical training 
involved in the engineering degree. 

110 



Forestry 

The curriculum for the first three years must include all the 
basic course requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree, 
as outlined on pages 100-1 of this catalog. A suggested program 
follows: 

Freshman Year 

1st semester 2nd semester 

English 110 Eng. Lit 160* 

Physics 117 Chem. 118 

Math 111 Math 112 

Foreign Language For Lan. 211, 215, or 216 

Physical Education 111 Physical Ed. 112 (Y 2 course) 

Sophomore Year 

Amer. Lit. 170 Humanities 111* 

Physics 161 Physics 162 

Philosophy 151** Math 251 

Psychology, Sociology or Religion** 

Politics 

Plus % course 

Junior Year 

History** Science Elective 

Science Elective Elective 

Math 311 Econ. 152 

Econ. 151 Elective 

Plus Y2 course 

This is a rigorous curriculum, demanding even for students 
with an aptitude for science and mathematics. The electives are 
chosen in consultation with the engineering adviser in the De- 
partment of Physics. 

Degrees in Forestry 

Wake Forest University cooperates with Duke University in 
an academic forestry training program. A student in this pro- 



* Foreign Literature is also an option for any one of these. 
** Several options are allowed in each of these disciplines. 



Ill 



Forestry 

gram devotes three years to study in the arts and sciences at 
Wake Forest University. [At least two years (18 courses) must 
be completed in Wake Forest College. He spends the sum- 
mer between his junior and senior years and the two following 
years in the Duke University School of Forestry] . Upon the suc- 
cessful completion of this five-year course of study he receives 
the degree of Bachelor of Science from Wake Forest University 
and the degree of Master of Forestry from the Duke School of 
Forestry. 

A student who wishes to qualify for this program must make 
formal application for admission to the Duke School of Forestry 
not later than the end of the first semester of his third year 
in college. To qualify for admission he must have followed a 
planned course of study as outlined below, must have the official 
recommendation of Wake Forest University, and must have an 
over-all quality point ratio of at least 2.5. 

Candidates for the degree in forestry must complete the fol- 
lowing three-year course before beginning study in the Duke 
School of Forestry: 

The basic course requirements listed on page 100. 

The divisional course requirements in Divisions I, III, and IV 
(see pages 101-102). 

The physical education requirement (see page 102). 

Biology 111, 112 or 151, 152 (2 courses) 
Economics 151, 152 (2 courses) 
Chemistry 111, 112 (2 courses) 
Mathematics 111, 112 (2 courses) 
Physics 111, 112 (2 courses) 

2 courses beyond the first year introductory courses in any 
one of the biological, physical, or social sciences. 

Electives (to make a total of 27 courses) 

(Suggested electives: Biology, Chemistry, Logic, Mathe- 
matics, Speech) 

Students in this program will be advised in the Department 
of Biology. 

112 



COURSES IN THE COLLEGE 

Course Numbers 

The numbers of the semester courses offered by the various 
departments are explained as follows: courses 1-99 carry no 
credit; courses 101-199 are primarily for freshmen and sopho- 
mores; courses 201-299, primarily for juniors and seniors; 
courses 301-399, for advanced undergraduate and graduate stu- 
dents; and courses 401-499, for graduate students. The letter S 
used as a prefix to a course number indicates that the course is 
offered during the summer session only. (Winter term courses 
are listed in a separate catalog and have their own numbering 
system). 

Courses with odd numbers are regularly given in the fall 
term; courses with even numbers, in the spring term. However, 
introductory or basic courses in many departments will be 
offered every term so that students may arrange their work in 
regular sequence, according to the time of entrance. Accord- 
ingly, revised class schedules will be distributed each term, 
containing the name of each instructor and the time and 
location of each class. 

Credit; Laboratory Courses 

All credit is granted in terms of courses, whether full or half 
courses. A semester course and a winter term course are con- 
sidered equivalents for credit purposes. In the course listings 
below, each course listed carries one full course of credit unless 
it is specifically designated as a half course. A course listing that 
carries credit of a half course for one semester is designated 
"V2 per sem." A listing that carries credit of a half course for 
two semesters is designated "^ per 2 sem." The course descrip- 
tion of a course that includes laboratory work indicates the 
number of hours per week normally spent in the laboratory, 
as "Lab. — 3 hrs." 

Prerequisites and Corequisites 

The prerequisite for a course is indicated, for example, as 
P-153, meaning that course 153 in the department under con- 
sideration will be required for admission to the desired course. 

113 



Honors Program 



When a prerequisite is in another department, the name of the 
department is given. A corequisite is indicated, for example, as 
C-151. 

Interdisciplinary Honors Program 

Wake Forest University offers an interdisciplinary honors pro- 
gram for a limited number of qualified students. Students in- 
terested in admission to the program, which is supervised by the 
Faculty Committee on Honors, should consult the Coordinator 
of the Honors Program. 

During their first three years in college, participants will 
often schedule three interdisciplinary honors seminars (nor- 
mally including two courses in the Lower Division and one 
course in the Upper Division). Many students will probably 
not participate formally in the interdisciplinary program 
beyond the third year, but will choose instead to concen- 
trate on departmental honors work in their major fields. Stu- 
dents, however, who are not candidates for departmental honors 
and who have completed four interdisciplinary seminars with a 
superior record may elect Honors 281 (directed study culmi- 
nating in an honors paper and an oral examination). Those 
whose work in this course is superior and who have achieved 
an over-all quality point ratio of at least 3.0 in all college work 
will be graduated "with Honors in the Arts and Sciences." 
Those students, on the other hand, who have chosen to be 
candidates for departmental honors may not also be candidates 
for "Honors in the Arts and Sciences." 

The courses described below (except for Honors 281) are 
designed to supplement the usual general education of the fresh- 
man and sophomore years and the more specialized work of the 
junior year. Honors 281 will normally be scheduled in the first 
semester of the senior year. 

Faculty participants in these courses represent a diversity of 
academic disciplines. 

Honors 131, 132. Approaches to Human Experience (I). An inquiry 
into the nature and interrelationships of several approaches to man's 
experience, represented by the work of three such men as Leonardo da 
Vinci, Dante, Newton, Gandhi, Confucius, Dostoyevsky, Descartes, Goya, 
Mozart, Jefferson, and Bohr. Seminar discussion based on primary 

114 



Honors Program 



and secondary sources, including musical works and paintings. Written 
reports and a term paper required. 
(Offered in alternate years) 

Honors 133, 134. Approaches to Human Experience (II). A parallel 
course to Honors 131, 132, concentrating on the work of a different set 
of figures such as Buber, Galileo, Keynes, Pascal, Camus, Picasso, Ibsen, 
Tagore, Sophocles, and Bach. 
(Offered in alternate years) 

One or more of the following courses are offered each year at the discre- 
tion of the Honors Committee: 

Honors 233. Darwinism and the Modern World. A study of the Dar- 
winian theory of evolution and the impact of evolutionary thought on 
fields such as economics, politics, psychology, literature and the other 
arts, and philosophy. 

Honors 235. The Ideal Society. Man's effort to establish or imagine the 
ideal community, state or society, principles of political and social organi- 
zation, changing goals and values. 

Honors 237. The Scientific Outlook. An exploration into the origins and 
development of the scientific method and into some of its contemporary 
applications in the natural and social sciences and the humanities. 

Honors 238. Romanticism. Romanticism as a recurrent characteristic 
of mind and art and as a specific historical movement in Europe and 
America in the late 18th and 19th centuries. Emphasis upon primary 
materials in such fields as philosophy, history, literature, music and 
painting. 

Honors 239. Man and the Irrational. The phenomenon of the irrational, 
with emphasis on its 20th century manifestations but with attention also 
to its presence in centuries and cultures other than our own. Such areas 
as philosophy, religion, literature, and psychology, politics and the arts 
will be explored. 

Honors 242. The Comic View. The theory of comedy in ancient and 
modern times; the expression of the comic spirit in literature, art, music, 
the theater and the motion picture. 

Honors 244. Man and the Structure of the Universe. An investigation of 
various conceptions of the universe and of their implications for man. 
Study will not necessarily be limited to the cosmologies of Ptolemy, 
Copernicus, and their modern successors, but may also include theories 
like the Babylonian, Mayan, and Taoist. 

Honors 246. Man and His Environment. An interdisciplinary examina- 
tion of man and his society in relation to his environment. 

Honors 281. Directed Study. Readings on an interdisciplinary topic 
approved by the Faculty Committee on Honors; preparation of a major 
research or interpretative paper based on these readings, under the 

115 



Art 



direction of a member of the Faculty; and an oral examination on the 
topic, administered by the faculty supervisor and the Committee on 
Honors. Eligible students who wish to take this course must submit a 
written request to the Committee on Honors by the end of the junior 
year. (Not open to candidates for departmental honors.) 

Departmental Honors Programs 

A number of departments in the College offer specialized 
honors programs for highly qualified majors, who may be gradu- 
ated "with Honors" in their major field. Details are given by 
the departments concerned. 

ART 

Associate Professor Boyd (Chairman) 

Instructors Bennett, Griffin, Wilkiemeyer 
*Artist-In-Residence Prohaska 

An art major is not offered at the present time, but students 
interested in this area of study should consult the Chairman of 
the Department. 

Art History 

Courses listed below are open to qualified freshmen and soph- 
omores with permission of the instructor. 

221. Art of India. A survey of Architecture, Painting, and Sculpture 
from the earliest times to 1200 A.D., with particular attention given to 
the aesthetic considerations, religious ideas, and ritual needs of Hinduism, 
Buddhism, and Jainism. Mr. Gokhale 

231. American Art. A survey of American Painting and Sculpture from 
1600 to 1900, with primary emphasis on painting. Mr. Boyd 

233. American Architecture. A survey of American Architecture from 
1600 to 1900, with particular emphasis on the Eighteenth and Early Nine- 
teenth centuries. Mr. Boyd 
241. Ancient Art. A survey of Painting and Sculpture of the Prehistoric 
and Ancient periods, with particular emphasis on Egyptian, Greek, and 
Roman Art. Mrs. Wilkiemeyer 
252. Medieval Art. A survey of Painting and Sculpture in Europe 
from 300 A.D. to 1400 A.D. Mrs. Wilkiemeyer 

269. Italian Renaissance Art. A survey of Italian painting and sculpture 
from 1400 to 1600. Mr. BOYD 

270. Northern Renaissance Art. A survey of painting in the Nether- 
lands, Germany, France, and England from 1400 to 1600. Mr. Boyd 

* Absent on leave, 1973-74. 

116 



Asian Studies 



272. Baroque Art. A survey of European painting and sculpture from 
1600 to 1700. Mrs. Griffin 

281. Modern Art to 1900. A survey of European painting and sculpture 
from 1700 to 1900, emphasizing the nineteenth century. MRS. GRIFFIN 

282. Modern Art after 1900. A survey of European and American paint- 
ing and sculpture from 1900 to the present. P-Art 281. Mrs. Griffin 
294. Architecture Survey after 1700. A survey of European and Ameri- 
can architecture from 1700 to the present, emphasizing the twentieth 
century. Mrs. Griffin 

Art Studio 

111, 112. Introduction to Painting. A basic course in drawing and paint- 
ing, in the media of charcoal, pastel, watercolor, acrylic, and oil. Ill is 
prerequisite for 112. Mr. Prohaska 

201, 202. Advanced Painting. A course of independent study with 
faculty guidance. P-lll, 112. Mr. Prohaska 

213, 214. Advanced Drawing. A course of independent study with 
faculty guidance. P-lll, 112. Mr. Prohaska 

THE ASIAN STUDIES PROGRAM 

B. G. Gokhale, Director 

The Asian Studies Program, established in 1960 with financial 
assistance from the Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation, is 
interdisciplinary in its nature and involves the cooperation and 
resources of several departments in the humanities and social 
sciences. Its objectives are to broaden the university's traditional 
curriculum with the infusion of a systematic knowledge and 
understanding of the culture of Asia. 

A description of each of these courses may be found in the 
curriculum of the department concerned. 

Anthropology 373. Peoples and Cultures of Southeast Asia. 

Art 221. Art of India. 

Asian Studies 211, 212. Asian Thought and Civilization. Some dominant 

themes in Asian thought and their influence on Asian civilizations. 

Chinese 111, 112. Elementary Chinese. 

History 341, 342. History and Civilization of Southeast Asia. 

History 343, 344. Imperial and Modern China. 

History 345, 346. History and Civilization of South Asia. 

History 349, 350. East Asia. 

Hindi 111, 112. Elementary Hindi. 

Hindi 153. Intermediate Hindi. 

117 



Biology 

Hindi 211. Hindi Literature. 

Politics 234. Asian Thought and Politics. 

Politics 245. Government and Politics of South Asia. 

Religion 360. Hinduism. 

Religion 361. Buddhism. 

BIOLOGY 

Professors Allen, Flory 

Associate Professors Amen, Dimmick, Esch, McDonald 

(Chairman), Olive, Sullivan, Wyatt 
Assistant Professors Becker, Dimock, Kuhn, Thomas, 

Weigl 
Lecturer in Biology and Research Associate in 

Otolaryngology (Bowman Gray) Lane 
Adjunct Assistant Professors Gengozian, Gibbons, 

Richardson 

At the end of the sophomore year a student electing to major 
in Biology meets with a major adviser and at this time the 
course of study for the junior and senior years is planned. The 
requirements for completion of the major are those in effect at 
the time of this conference since the curriculum and depart- 
mental requirements change slightly during the student's period 
of residence at Wake Forest. All majors are required to take 
Biology 111, 151, 152. Co-major requirements are four full 
courses in the physical sciences. 

For students declaring majors in the spring of 1975 the re- 
quirements for the major beyond Biology 111, 151, 152 are five 
full courses in Biology which must include one course from 
Biology 325, 327, 328, 338, and one from Biology 320, 321, 333, 
334. A minimum grade average of C on all courses attempted 
in Biology is required for graduation. 

Students electing to major in Biology later than the spring of 
1975 must consult the catalog of that year or consult with a 
Biology major adviser for the major requirements of that year. 

Prospective majors are strongly urged to enroll in Chem. 111- 
112 and Biology 111-152 concurrently during the freshman se- 
mesters and follow this sequence with Chem. 221-222 and 

118 



Biology 

Biology 151 taken concurrently the second year. Deviations from 
this pattern occasionally necessitate summer work in order to 
facilitate the progress of the potential major. 

Advanced work in many areas of Biology may require addi- 
tional full courses in mathematics, the physical sciences, and 
biology. The advisor will call these to the attention of majors, 
depending on their individual needs. All 300 level semester 
courses presume a background equivalent to Introductory and 
Intermediate Biology, e.g., Biology 111-112 and Biology 151-152. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the Department to 
apply for admission to the honors program in Biology. To be 
graduated with the designation "Honors in Biology," they must 
meet uniform requirements listed on page — , complete Biology 
391, 392 and pass a comprehensive oral examination. For addi- 
tional information members of the staff should be consulted. 

111-112. Introductory Biology. Fundamental ideas of the structure and 
activity of living systems. Lab — 3 hrs. Ill prerequisite for 112. 

151-152. Intermediate Biology. Physiological, development, genetic and 
ecological principles common to a wide range of living systems, with 
emphasis on molecular and cellular aspects. Prerequisite or corequisite, 
one year of physical science. Lab — 3 hrs. 151 prerequisite for 152. 

5301. Biological Diversity. A course for secondary school teachers de- 
signed to illustrate selected taxonomic and ecologic principles. Not for 
majors. 

5302. Biological Unity. A course for secondary school teachers designed 
to illustrate important physiologic and genetic principles. Not for majors. 

S305. Teaching of Modern and Advanced Biology. Cooperative project 
between the University and Public Schools. Participation limited to ex- 
perienced teachers of Biology. 

312. Genetics. A study of the principles of inheritance and their applica- 
tion to plants and animals, including man. Laboratory work in the 
methods of breeding some genetically important organisms and of com- 
piling and presenting data. Lab — 3 hrs. 

314. Evolution. Analysis of the theories, evidences, and mechanisms of 
evolution. 

318. Economic Botany. A survey of the plant kingdom giving considera- 
tion to both the positive and negative importance of plants of all groups 
to man. 

320. Chordates. A study of chordate animals with emphasis on com- 
parative anatomy and phylogeny. Dissection of representative forms in 
the laboratory. Lab — 4 hrs. 

119 



Biology 

321. Parasitology. A survey of protozoan, helminth, and arthropod 
parasites from the standpoint of morphology, taxonomy, life-histories, 
and host-parasite relationships. Lab — 4 hrs. 

325. Plant Anatomy. A study of comparative anatomy of the vascular 
plants with emphasis on phylogeny and anatomical microtechniques. 
Lab — 4 hrs. 

326. Microorganisms. A study of the more important groups of micro- 
organisms, with emphasis on bacteria and their activities. Lab — 4 hrs. 

327. Non-vascular Plants. An examination of representative non-vascu- 
lar plants, with emphasis on morphology and phylogeny. Lab — 4 hrs. 

328. Vascular Plants. A comparative survey of the vascular plants with 
emphasis on structure, reproduction, classification and phylogeny. Lab — 
4 hrs. 

331. Invertebrates. Systematic study of invertebrates with emphasis on 
functional morphology, behavior, ecology, and phylogeny. Lab — 3 hrs. 

333. Vertebrates. Systematic study of vertebrates with emphasis on 
evolution, physiology, behavior, and ecology. Laboratory devoted to sys- 
tematic, field, and experimental studies. Lab — 4 hrs. 

334. Entomology. A study of insects with emphasis on structure, de- 
velopment, taxonomy, and phylogeny. Lab — 4 hrs. 

338. Plant Taxonomy. A study of the classification of seed plants with 
emphasis on a comparative study of orders and families. Lab — 4 hrs. 

340. Ecology. Inter-relationships among living systems and their en- 
vironments. Structure and dynamics of major ecosystem types. Con- 
temporary problems in ecology. Lab — 4 hrs. 

341. Marine Biology. An introduction to the physical, chemical, and 
biological parameters affecting the distribution of marine organisms. 
Lab — 3 hrs. 

351. Physiology. A study of the physiological activities of all types of 
organisms. Emphasis on intermediary metabolism and regulatory mech- 
anisms. Lab — 4 hrs. 

355. Developmental Physiology. A functional study of the growth, de- 
velopment, and reproduction of selected organisms with emphasis on the 
regulatory mechanisms of morphogenesis. Lab — 3 hrs. 

360. Development. A study of development including aspects of verte- 
brate, invertebrate, and other developmental systems emphasizing the 
regulation of differentiation. Lab — 4 hrs. 

370. Biochemistry. A lecture and laboratory course in biochemistry, in- 
cluding principles of biochemistry, chemical composition of living sys- 
tems, intermediary metabolism, enzyme kinetics, biochemical techniques, 
and biochemical energetics. Lab — 3 hrs. 

372. Cytology. Histology and Microtechnique. A study of the structure 
and function of cells and tissues with laboratory emphasis on methods of 
preparation of cells and tissues for examination. Lab — 4 hrs. 

120 



Business and Accountancy 



391, 392. Special Problems in Biology. (Y 2 per sem.) Independent 
library and laboratory investigation carried out under the supervision of 
a member of the staff. Permission of the instructor required. 

395. Philosophy of Biology. A seminar course dealing with the philo- 
sophic structure of the biologic sciences, including an examination of 
major conceptual schemes and theoretic ideas unique to biology. 

Courses for Graduate Students* 

401-408. Topics in Biology 

411, 412. Directed Study in Biology 

420. Genetics (Cytogenetics) 

430. Invertebrate Zoology 

440. Physiological Ecology 

450. Cell Biology 

460. Developmental Biology 

480. Biosystematics 

491, 492. Thesis Research 

591, 592. Dissertation Research 

BUSINESS AND ACCOUNTANCY 

Professors Hylton**, Owen 
Associate Professor Cook 
Assistant Professors Ewing, Taylor 
Instructor Sekely 
Lecturer Dunford 

General requirements for both the B.S. in Business and the B.S. 
in Accountancy. 

For each degree, the student must make the following selec- 
tions from these required course categories: 

(a) from Natural Sciences and Mathematics: at least one, 
preferably two courses must be selected from Mathe- 
matics. 

(b) from the Social Sciences: at least one course must be 
selected in the Economics Department. 

The requirements for additional work in each degree are 
stated in the following descriptions: 



* For course descriptions, see the Graduate Bulletin. 
** Absent on leave, 1973-74. 

121 



Business 

Business 
For the major in Business, nine semester courses are required 
in the Department of Business and Accountancy. Required 
courses are: Accountancy 111 and 112; Business 211, 221, 231, 
261, 268 and 271 or 272. 

The degree, B.S. in Business, is offered for the student who 
anticipates a career in the business world. The curriculum is 
designed to equip the student with basic tools and knowledge 
which should enable him to perform adequately in his first 
position and to advance to more responsible positions in the 
management hierarchy. 

211. Organization and Management. The study of the basic manage- 
ment functions, principles, concepts, and practices in the operation of 
modern business organizations. 

212. Advanced Management. A study of the techniques of decision mak- 
ing utilizing case analyses, problem-solving, and report writing procedures 
based on extensive readings. P-211. 

221. Principles of Marketing. Survey of marketing structures, concepts, 
and motivation of current marketing environment. Study of managerial 
decisions necessary in the distribution of industrial and consumer goods. 

222. Advanced Marketing. A study of the management of marketing 
activities, the interrelationship of these activities, and their relationship 
to the other functions of the firm. P-221. 

231. Financial Management. Analysis of financial decision making at 
the level of the individual business enterprise. P- Accountancy 111. 

232. Advanced Financial Management. Management decision-making 
applied to the financial function, including credit, investment, and related 
problems. P-231 and Accountancy 112. 

241. Labor Policy. Theories of wage determination, employment, and 
income distribution with emphasis on labor units and the collective bar- 
gaining process. P-211. 

261. Legal Environment of Business. Study of the legal environment 
within which business decisions must be made. 

268. Business Statistics. A study of statistical analysis designed to 
implement the decision-making process in business situations. Credit may 
not be received for this course and Math 157 or Soc. 380. 

271. Seminar in Quantitative Techniques in Business. Development and 
understanding of decision tools and models to be applied to the business 
decision process. P-Math 115. 

272. Behavioral Seminar in Business. Individual research and study of 
environmental factors influencing business decisions and operations. P-211 
and 221. 

281. Reading and Research. An advanced course devoted to individual 
reading and research in the field of Business. P-Permission of Instructor. 

122 



Accountancy 



Accountancy 

The major in Accountancy requires eleven semester courses in 
Accountancy and Business. Required courses are: Accountancy 
111, 112, 151, 152, 252, 261, 271, and 273; Business 231, 261, 
268 and the winter term income tax course. 

The B.S. in Accountancy is offered to those students who 
expect to pursue a career in the accounting profession. The 
curriculum is designed to equip the student for staff and 
managerial positions in public accounting, industrial account- 
ing, and similar positions in non-profit institutions. One who 
completes the B.S. in Accountancy is qualified to sit for the 
CPA examination in North Carolina. 

111. Basic Financial Accounting. The accounting equation and account- 
ing cycle. Preparation and interpretation of financial statements. 

112. Basic Managerial Accounting. Cost-profit-volume analysis, cost ac- 
counting concepts and capital budgeting. P-lll. 

151. Intermediate Accounting. A detailed analysis of theory and related 
problems for typical accounts on published financial statements. P-112. 

152. Intermediate Accounting. Continuation of Accounting 151. P-151. 

252. Budgeting and Control. Preparation and use of budget for control 
purposes, including extensive study of standard costs. P-112. 

253. Accounting Information Systems. A study of functions performed 
by an adequate information system, and methods and procedures neces- 
sary to supply useful data. P-252. 

254. Accounting in the Not-for-Profit Sector. An examination of ac- 
counting theory and practice in governmental and eleemosynary organi- 
zations, including an examination of national income accounting. P-151. 

261. Advanced Accounting Problems. A study of the more complex 
problems found in business operations-business combinations, reorgani- 
zations, and dissolution. P-151. 

271. Income Tax Accounting. Accounting for purposes of complying 
with the Internal Revenue Code. Preparation of personal and business 
tax returns. P-151 and winter tax course. 

273. Auditing. Designed to familiarize the student with the CPA pro- 
fession, with particular emphasis on the attest function. P-152 and 252. 

275. CPA Review. An intensive study of CPA-type problems found on 
the Accounting Practice and Accounting Theory sections of the CPA 
exam. P-252 and 261. 

278. Reading and Research. Directed study in specialized areas of 
accountancy. P-Permission of Instructor. 

123 



Chemistry 

CHEMISTRY 

Professors P. J. Hamrick, Miller, Nowell 

Associate Professors Baird (Chairman), Blalock, Gross, 

Noftle 
Assistant Professors Blankespoor, Hegstrom 

The B.A. Degree in Chemistry must include Chemistry 111- 
112 or 118, 221-222, 341-342, 361; Mathematics through 111; 
and Physics 111-112 or its equivalent. 

The B.S. Degree in Chemistry must include Chemistry 111- 
112 or 118, 221-222, 334, 341-342, 361, 371, 391 or 392; Mathe- 
matics through 112; and Physics 111-112 or its equivalent. 

An average of C in the first two years of chemistry is required 
of students who elect to major in this department. Admission 
to any class is contingent upon satisfactory grades in prerequi- 
site courses, and registration for advanced courses must be ap- 
proved by the department. 

The department is on the list of departments certified by 
the American Chemical Society. 

- Qualified majors are considered for Honors in Chemistry. To 
be graduated with the designation "Honors in Chemistry," a 
student must meet minimum requirements listed on page 8, 
and must complete satisfactorily Chemistry 391-392 or an inde- 
pendent study project approved by the department and an 
examination covering primarily the independent study project 
undertaken. For additional information members of the staff 
should be consulted. 

Prospective majors are urged to take Chemistry 111-112 in 
the freshman year. For B.S. majors the following schedule of 
chemistry and closely related courses is strongly recommended: 
Freshman Year Sophomore Year 

Chemistry 111-112 Chemistry 221-222 

Mathematics 111-112 Mathematics 121-251 

Junior Year Senior Year 

Chemistry 341-342 Chemistry 361 

Chemistry 334 Chemistry 371 

Physics 161-162 Chemistry, Mathematics or 

Physics Electives 

111, 112. College Chemistry. Fundamental chemical principles. Labora- 
tory covers basic quantitative analysis. Lab — 3 hrs. 

124 



Chemistry 

118. Principles of Chemistry. Fundamental chemical principles with 
emphasis on structural concepts. Laboratory work in basic quantitative 
analysis. Lab — 4 hrs. P-lll or permission of instructor. 
221, 222. Organic Chemistry. Principles and reactions of organic chem- 
istry. Lab — 3 hrs. P-112 or 118. 

S301, S302. Principles of Chemistry. Further study of fundamental 
chemical principles. For public school teachers. Lab — 3 hrs. P-112. 
S305. Introductory Organic Chemistry. Introduction to principles and 
reactions of organic chemistry. For public school teachers. Lab — 3 hrs. 
P-112. 

323. Organic Analysis. The systematic identification of organic com- 
pounds. Lab — 4 hrs. P-222. 

324. Chemical Synthesis. ( x /2 or 1)- A library, conference and laboratory 
course. Lab — 4 or 8 hrs. P-222. 

334. Chemical Analysis. Theoretical and practical applications of mod- 
ern methods of chemical analysis. Lab — 4 hrs. C-341. 
341, 342. Physical Chemistry. Fundamentals of physical chemistry. Lab 
— 4 hrs. P-112 or 118; Math 111; C-Physics 111-112 or 117. 

361. Inorganic Chemistry. Principles and reactions of inorganic chemis- 
try. Lab — 4 hrs. C-341. 

371. Introductory Quantum Chemistry. Application of quantum theory 
to topics in chemistry. 

381, 382. Chemistry Seminar. Discussions of contemporary research. 
Attendance required of all graduate students and all chemistry majors. 
No credit. 

391, 392. Independent Study. (Y 2 per sem.) Library, conference and in- 
dependent study. Lab — 6 hrs. 

Courses for Graduate Students* 
421, 422. Advanced Organic Chemistry. 
441. Molecular Structure. 

445. Thermodynamics. 

446. Chemical Kinetics. 

447. Chemical Bonding. 

462. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 

471. Quantum Chemistry. 

475. Statistical Mechanics. 

491, 492. Thesis Research. 

529. Tutorial in Organic Chemistry. 

549. Tutorial in Physical Chemistry. 

569. Tutorial in Inorganic Chemistry. 

579. Tutorial in Theoretical Chemistry. 

591, 592. Dissertation Research. 

* For course descriptions, see the 1 * Graduate Bulletin. 

125 



Classical Languages 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE 

Professor C. V. Harris 

Assistant Professors Andronica (Chairman), Ulery 
Instructors Heatley, F. Sanders 

The Department of Classical Languages offers two majors: a 
major in Greek and a major in Latin. 

A major in Greek requires nine semester courses in the de- 
partment beyond the elementary courses (111, 112). Seven of 
these semester courses must be in the Greek language. 

For those who began Latin at Wake Forest with the course 
111 or 113, a major requires nine semester courses in the depart- 
ment beyond the elementary courses (111, 112, 113). Seven of 
these semester courses must be in the Latin language. 

For those who begin with Latin 153 at Wake Forest a major 
requires nine semester courses in the department. Seven of these 
semester courses must be in the Latin language. 

For those who begin with Latin 211 at Wake Forest a major 
requires eight semester courses in the department. Six of these 
semester courses must be in the Latin language. 

Teacher certification. The requirements for certification to 
teach Latin in high school are the same as the requirements for 
a major in Latin. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to 
apply for admission to the honors program in Latin or Greek. 
To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Latin," or 
"Honors in Greek," they must meet minimum requirements 
listed on page 8, and must complete an honors research proj- 
ect and pass an oral comprehensive examination. At least two 
of the semester courses counted toward the major must be semi- 
nar courses. For additional information members of the staff 
should be consulted. 

126 



Latin 



I 

Greek Language and Literature 

111, 112. Elementary Greek. Greek grammar; selections from Greek 
prose writers and poets. 

153. Intermediate Greek. Grammar and Xenophon's Anabasis. Thor- 
ough drill in syntax. 

211. Plato. Selections from the dialogues of Plato. 

212. Homer. Selections from the Iliad and Odyssey. 

221, 222. Selected Readings. Intensive reading courses designed to meet 
individual needs and interests. 

231. The Greek New Testament. Selections from the Greek New Testa- 
ment. 

241. Greek Tragedy. Euripides: Medea. This course will include a study 
of the origin and history of Greek tragedy, with collateral reading of 
selected tragedies in translation. Seminar. 

242. Greek Comedy. Aristophanes: Clouds. This course will include a 
study of the origin and history of Greek comedy, with collateral reading 
of selected comedies in translation. Seminar. 

291-292. Honors in Greek. (V2 P e r sem.) Directed research for honors 
paper. 

II 

Latin Language and Literature 

111, 112. Elementary Latin. Introduction to Latin grammar. 

113. Elementary Latin. Introduction to Latin grammar. Not open to 
students who have had Latin 111 or 112. 

153. Intermediate Latin. Grammar review and selected readings. 

211. Vergil. Intensive readings from the Aeneid, with emphasis on 
literary values. 

212. Roman Historians. A reading of the works of Sallust and Livy, 
with attention to historical milieu and the norms of ancient historiogra- 
phy. Fall semester. 

216. Roman Lyric Poetry. An interpretation and evaluation of lyric 
poetry through readings from a wide variety of the poems of Catullus 
and Horace. Spring semester. 

221. Tacitus. A reading and critical analysis of the works of Tacitus. 

225. Roman Epistolography. Selected readings from the correspondence 
of Cicero and Pliny the Younger and the literary epistles of Horace 
and Ovid. 

226. Roman Comedy. Reading of selected comedies of Plautus and 
Terence with a study of literary values and dramatic techniques. 

127 



Classics 

241. Satire. Selected readings from Lucilius, Horace and Juvenal. At- 
tention will be given to the origin and development of the genre. Seminar. 

242. Satire. Readings from Petronius and the Ludus de Morte Claudii. 
Seminar. 

243. Latin Readings. A course designed to meet individual needs and 
interests. 

250. Prose Composition. 

261. Lucretius. Readings from the De Rerum Natura, with attention 
to literary values and philosophical import. Seminar. 

262. Cicero. Readings from Cicero's philosophical essays, together with 
a survey of Greek philosophical antecedents. 

265. The Elegiac Poets. Readings of Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid, 
along with the study of the elegiac tradition. Seminar. 

291-92. Honors in Latin. (y 2 per sem.) Directed research for honors 
paper. 

Ill 

Classics 

253. Greek Epic Poetry in Translation. Oral epic poetry with primary 
emphasis on the Iliad and the Odyssey of Homer and the later develop- 
ment of the genre. Offered Fall 1972 and alternate years thereafter. 

254. Roman Epic Poetry in Translation. A study of the Latin treatment 
and development of the literary form, with emphasis on Lucretius, Vergil, 
Ovid, and Lucan. Offered spring 1973 and alternate years thereafter. 

263. Tragic Drama in Translation. A study of the origins and develop- 
ment of Greek tragedy and its influence on Roman writers, with readings 
from Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Offered fall 1971 and alternate 
years thereafter. 

264. Greek and Roman Comedy in Translation. Representative works 
of Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus, and Terence, with attention to the 
origins and development of comedy. Offered spring 1972 and alternate 
years thereafter. 

265. A Survey of Greek Literature in Translation. A study of selections 
from Greek literature in English translation. A knowledge of the Greek 
language is not required. 

270. Greek Civilization. Lectures and collateral reading upon those 
phases of Greek civilization which have particular significance for the 
modern world. A knowledge of the Greek language is not required. 

271. Roman Civilization. This course consists of lectures and collateral 
reading upon the general subject of Rome's contributions to the modem 
world. A knowledge of the Latin language is not required. 

272. A Survey of Latin Literature in Translation. A study of selections 
from Latin literature in English translation. A knowledge of the Latin 
language is not required. 

128 



Economics 

ECONOMICS 

Associate Professors Wagstaff (Chairman), Cage 
Assistant Professors Bidwell, Frey, Moorhouse 

The objectives of the economics program at Wake Forest Uni- 
versity are to help prepare students for effective participation 
in the decision-making processes of society, to develop analytical 
skills in solving economic problems, to promote a better under- 
standing of alternative economic systems, and to provide a 
balanced curriculum that will prepare students for graduate 
study or positions in industry and government. 

The major in Economics requires 9 semester courses in the 
field of Economics, including Economics 151, 152, 201, and 202.* 
The remaining courses for a major in Economics and courses in 
related fields are selected by the students and the Economics 
adviser. A minimum grade of C on all courses attempted in Eco- 
nomics is required for graduation. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to 
apply for admission to the honors program in Economics. To be 
graduated with the designation "Honors in Economics," they 
must meet minimum requirements listed on page 8, and must 
complete a satisfactory economics research project, pass a com- 
prehensive oral examination on the project, and complete Eco- 
nomics 281 or 287 and Economics 288. For additional informa- 
tion members of the staff should be consulted. 

111. Introduction to Economic Analysis. A one semester survey of the 
discipline. Elementary supply and demand analysis is considered in 
addition to more general topics involving the formation of national eco- 
nomic policy. Credit not granted for this course and Economics 151 or 152. 

151. Principles of Economics. A study of individual economic units in 
a market economy with some attention given to monopoly, labor unions, 
and poverty. 

152. Principles of Economics. Attention is focused on the functioning of 
the economy as a whole with particular reference to unemployment, in- 
flation, economic growth and policy. P-151. 

201. Microeconomic Theory. Develops the theory of consumer behavior 
and the theory of the firm with emphasis on price and output determina- 
tion under various market conditions. P-151, 152. 



* Economics 111 will satisfy the requirement for Economics 151 and 152 by permission 
of the department. 

129 



Economics 

202. Macroeconomic Theory. A study of Keynesian and post-Keynesian 
theories about the determination of the level of national income, employ- 
ment and economic growth. P-151, 152. 

203. Introduction to Econometrics. Economic analysis through quanti- 
tative methods, with emphasis on model construction and empirical re- 
search. 

221. Public Finance. An examination of the economic behavior of gov- 
ernment. Includes principles of taxation, spending, borrowing, and debt 
management. P-151, 152. 

222. Monetary Theory and Policy. A rigorous development of the theory 
of supply and demand for money plus the inter-relationship among 
prices, interest rates, and aggregate output. P-151, 152. 

242. Labor Economics. Economic analysis of wages and hours, employ- 
ment, wage and job discrimination, investment in education, and unions. 
P-151, 152. 

244. Industrial Organization. An analysis of market structure with 
particular reference to organization practices, price formation, efficiency, 
and public regulation. P-151, 152. 

251. International Economics. A study of international trade theory, 
balance of payments, foreign exchange, trade restrictions and commercial 
policies. P-151, 152. 

252. Economic Growth and Development. A study of the problems of 
economic growth with particular attention to the less developed countries 
of the world. P-151, 152. 

255. Comparative Economic Systems. An objective examination of the 
theory and practices of various economic systems, including capitalism, 
socialism, and communism. P-151, 152. 

256. Urban Economics. Application of economic theory to suburbaniza- 
tion, land values, urban decay, zoning, location decisions of firms and 
households, and metropolitan fiscal problems. P-151, 152. 

261. American Economic Development. The application of economic 
theory to historical problems and issues in the American economy. P-151, 
152. 

262. History of Economic Thought. A historical survey of the main 
developments in economic thought from the biblical period to the twen- 
tieth century. P-151, 152. 

281. Contemporary Economic Problems. An economic analysis of current 
issues, with emphasis placed upon contributions of economic theory to 
policy formation. P-Permission of the Instructor. 

287. Senior Readings. A student-faculty seminar in which selected publi- 
cations are analyzed and discussed. P-Permission of the Instructor. 
Graded Pass-Fail. 

288. Economic Research. Independent study and research supervised by 
a member of the economics staff. P-201, 202. 

130 



Education 



EDUCATION 

Professors Parker, Preseren 

Associate Professors Elmore, Hall, Reeves 

Assistant Professors Hood, Litcher 

Ordinarily, teacher education students major in the academic 
areas in which they plan to teach. Only students planning to 
be certificated in the broad areas of Intermediate Education, 
Science or Social Studies are permitted to major in Education. 
A major in Education requires completion of the approved pro- 
gram in Education and the courses listed as academic require- 
ments for the Intermediate, Science or Social Studies Certifi- 
cate. 

Institutional Policy. The University recognizes that the 
educational profession is important to society and that the 
welfare of mankind is largely determined by the quality of 
educational leadership. One of the major objectives of Wake 
Forest University has been and continues to be the preparation 
of teachers and other professional school personnel. This com- 
mitment was reemphasized by vote of the faculty on November 
18, 1963. 

Wake Forest is committed to a high quality teacher education 
program, as evinced by selective admission to the program; a 
wide range of approved courses of professional instruction; and 
a closely supervised practicum suitable to the professional needs 
of the students. 

In addition to the professional program, the Department of 
Education provides elective courses open to all students, in- 
cluding those not in teacher education programs. Such courses 
supplement the work of other departments and provide generally 
for the liberal education of all students. 

Teacher Certification. The North Carolina State Department 
of Public Instruction issues the Professional Class A teacher's 
certificate to graduates of the University who have completed 
an Approved Program, including the specified courses in their 
teaching field (s) and the prescribed courses in Education, and 
who receive recommendations from the designated official (s) 

131 



Education 



of their teaching area(s) and from the Chairman of the De- 
partment of Education. 

Special students not completing an Approved Program are 
required to secure an analysis of their deficiencies for the Class 
A certificate from the Department of Education which will also 
plan a program to remove these deficiencies. 

Certification requirements for other states should be secured 
from the Department of Education which will assist in planning 
a program to meet certification requirements of those states. 

Admission Requirements. Admission to the teacher education 
program occurs normally during the sophomore year. Admission 
involves filing an official application with the Department of 
Education, being screened by a faculty committee, and being 
officially approved by the Department of Education. 

Course Requirements. The Approved Program of Teacher 
Education requires candidates to complete successfully a series 
of professional education courses. Psychology 151 and Speech 
151 are recommended electives. The exact sequence of profes- 
sional and academic courses varies with a student's particular 
program and is determined in conference between the candidate, 
his advisor, and/ or a member of the Education faculty. In 
most cases, the majority of the work in the teacher education 
program is taken simultaneously during one semester of the 
senior year, according to the availability of programs. Candi- 
dates for the Intermediate Certificate, however, will begin 
course work required for certification as early as the Sophomore 
year. 

While enrolled in the block semester, the student will not be 
allowed to take courses concurrently that would interfere with 
being in an assigned student teaching situation for the regular 
public school day (generally 8:00 a.m. to 3:45 p.m.) nor allowed 
to take more than one course occurring outside the regular 
school day. 

Student Teaching. Prerequisites for registering for Student 
Teaching include: 

1. Senior or graduate standing or classification as a graduate- 
level special student. 

132 



Education 



2. A grade average of at least C on all courses taken at Wake 
Forest. 

3. A grade average of at least C on all courses taken in the 
area of certification or, in case of two or more fields of certi- 
fication, in each of the areas. 

4. Approval for admission to the Teacher Education Program. 

5. Approval by a Student Teaching Screening Committee. 

Students are assigned to Student Teaching opportunities by 
public school officials on the basis of available positions and 
professional needs of the student and of the public school sys- 
tem. The University does not assume the responsibility for 
transportation to the schools during Student Teaching. 

Academic Requirements 

English — 8 semester courses, including: one course numbered 160-175; 
323; 390; and at least four additional semester courses numbered 300- 
399. One winter term course in English. 

French — 9 semester courses, including French 151, 152, 215, 221, 222, 224, 
or their equivalents; at least 2 courses in literature beyond 215. 

German — 8 semester courses, including German 153, 211, 212; 2 courses 
chosen from German 217, 218, 219, 220; at least 3 courses in literature 
beyond 212. 

Latin — Based on 2 high school units, 9 semester courses in the Depart- 
ment of Classics, 7 of which must be in the Latin language. 

Spanish — 9 semester courses, including Spanish 151, 152, 215, 221, 223, 
or their equivalents; 2 courses chosen from 224, 225, 226, and at least 
1 course in literature beyond 215. 

Intermediate Education — 15 semester courses, including appropriate 
Basic Course and Divisional Course requirements: 3 courses in Eng- 
lish, 3 in Social Studies (with study in at least two areas other than 
History), 2 in Science, 2 in Mathematics, 1 in Art, 1 in Music, 1 in 
Humanities, and 2 in Physical Education. In addition, an academic 
concentration in one of the teaching areas of the intermediate grades 
must be completed. 

Mathematics — 10 semester courses, including Mathematics 111, 112, 121, 
221, 231, 332, and at least 2 other 300-level courses. 

Music — 15 courses, including 3 courses in applied music (including a 
keyboard proficiency equivalent to Piano 124a) . For further information 
consult the Music Department section of this catalog or the chairman 
of the Music Department. 

133 



Education 



Physical Education and Health — 9 courses, including 220, 221, 222, 224, 
252, 353, 357, 360, and 363, and Biology 111 and 112. 

Science — 11% to 13 semester courses, consisting of 2 semester courses 
each in Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics, plus additional 
courses in Biology (4 courses), or Chemistry (5 courses), or Physics 
(3 x /2 courses). 

Biology — 6 semester courses. 

Chemistry — 7y 2 semester courses including the first year of Chemistry. 

Physics — 5V2 semester courses. 

Social Studies — 12 courses, including 6 courses in History with at least 
2 courses in U. S. History and 2 courses in World (European) History; 

5 courses from Politics, Sociology, Anthropology, or Economics with no 
more than 2 courses in any one area; and a course in Geography. 

Economics — 6 courses. 

Government — 6 courses. 

History — 6 courses with at least 2 courses in U. S. History and 2 courses 

in World (European) History. 

Sociology — 6 courses. 

Speech— 10 courses, including 121, 151, 161, 231, 252, and 261. 

Required Courses 

These courses are required for a secondary or special sub- 
ject certificate. 

201. Foundations of Education. Philosophical, historical, and sociological 
foundations of education including analysis of contemporary issues and 
problems. 

211. Educational Psychology. General principles of adolescent develop- 
ment. The nature, theories, processes, and conditions of effective teaching- 
learning. Appraising and directing learning. Internship. P-201. 

251. Student Teaching. Observation and experience in school-related 
activities. Supervised student teaching. Graded "Pass-Fail". For require- 
ments and prerequisites see pages 132-133. P-201. 

291. Methods and Materials. Methods, materials, and techniques used 
in teaching the various subjects. P-201. 

Teaching of English, each term. 

Teaching of Foreign Language, fall term. 

Teaching of Health and Physical Education, spring term. 

Teaching of Mathematics, spring term. 

Teaching of Music, spring term. 

134 



Education 



Teaching of Science, fall term. 

Teaching of Social Studies, each term. 

Teaching of Speech, spring term. 

331. The School and Teaching. Organization of the school system. Bases 
of education. The curriculum. Major problems of education and teaching. 
The role of the teacher. Psychological aspects of teaching. P-201. 

These courses are required for an Intermediate teacher's certi- 
ficate: 

201. Foundations of Education. 
211. Educational Psychology. 

221. Children's Literature and Reading. A survey of the types of litera- 
ture appropriate for the intermediate grades and an investigation of the 
basic problems in reading. 

222. The Arts in the Intermediate Grades. The development of skills in 
music, fine arts, and basic physical activities appropriate to the inter- 
mediate grades. 

223. Health and Physical Education for the Intermediate Grades. The 
development of physical education skills appropriate for the intermediate 
grade teacher and an understanding of the personal and community 
health needs appropriate for this grade level. 

251. Student Teaching. 

295. Methods and Materials for Teaching Language Arts and Social 
Studies. A survey of the basic materials, methods, and techniques of 
teaching the language arts and social studies in the intermediate grades. 

296. Methods and Materials for Teaching Science and Mathematics. A 
survey of the basic materials, methods, and techniques of teaching 
science and mathematics in the intermediate grades. 

313. Human Growth and Development. Theories of childhood and adoles- 
cent development and their educational implications physically, intellec- 
tually, emotionally, socially, and morally. 

Elective Courses 

271. Introduction to Geography. A study of the physical environment 
and its relationship to man, including an examination of climate, vege- 
tation, soils, water resources and land forms found in various regions 
throughout the world. 

301. Audiovisual Education. Introduction to the field of audiovisual 
education, development and application of skills in the use of instruc- 
tional materials, equipment, and programs. 

302. Production of Instructional Materials. Methods of producing in- 
structional materials and other technological techniques. P-301. 

135 



Education 

303. History of European Education. A study of educational theory and 
practice from classical Greece through modern Europe, stressing the 
writers who have contributed to western educational thought. 

304. History of American Education. A study of education in the United 
States from Colonial days to the present, with special focus on the social 
forces which have influenced American educational thought. 

321. Educational Tests and Measurement. Principles and concepts of 
evaluation and measurement; validity and reliability of tests; interpreta- 
tion and selection of standardized group tests. 

323. Educational Statistics. Descriptive, inferential, and nonparametric 
statistical procedures involved in educational research. Not open to 
students who have taken Psychology 211 and 212. P-instructor. 

341. Principles of Counseling and Guidance. Counseling history, philos- 
ophy, theory, procedure, and process. Therapeutic and developmental 
counseling approaches in guidance and personnel work in educational, 
social, business, and community service agencies. 

Courses for Graduate Students* 

405. Sociology of Education. 

407. Philosophy of Education. 

413. Psychology of Learning. 

421. Educational Research. 

431. Foundation of Curriculum Development. 

433. Supervision of Instruction. 

441. Theories and Models of Counseling. 

442. Group Procedures in Counseling. 

443. Vocational Psychology. 

444. Individual Assessment. 

445. Counseling Laboratory and Internship. 

461. Student Personnel Work and Higher Education. 

462. Dimensions of College Student Development. 

463. Seminar in Counseling and Student Personnel Work. 
483. Readings and Research in Education. 

491, 492. Thesis Research. 



* For course descriptions, see the Graduate Bulletin. 

136 



English 

ENGLISH 

Professors Carter, Gossett, Phillips (Chairman), 

Wilson 
Associate Professors Fosso, Kenion, L. Potter, Shorter 
Assistant Professors Johnston, Lobb, Lovett, Milner, 

Raynor, Roman 
Instructors Bonnette, Dervin, Johnson, McCaskey, 

Meyer, Moss 
Lecturers Shaw, Speer 

The prerequisite for admission to all advanced courses in 
English is any one of the courses in English and American liter- 
ature numbered 160-175. 100-level courses are offered each 
semester. Courses in journalism and writing, beyond the basic 
requirement of freshman composition, are offered as related sub- 
jects in the English department. They may be taken as electives 
regardless of the field of study in which a student majors. 

The major in English requires a minimum of nine semester 
courses, at least seven of which must be numbered 300-399. Of 
the advanced courses, one must be Shakespeare and an addi- 
tional one must be in English literature before 1750 (courses 
numbered 300-339) ; two must be in English literature after 1750 
(courses numbered 340-369); and one must be in American lit- 
erature (courses numbered 370-385). The advanced courses must 
also include one from three of the following four groups: I. 
(courses 315, 325, 350, 354, 362, 367, 376) ; II. (courses 335, 353, 
357, 365, 380); III. (courses 310, 330, 343, 360, 372, 374, 382); 
IV. (courses 320, 332, 364, 369, 378). Every course numbered 
300-385 satisfies two required categories. Course 386 may be 
substituted in satisfaction of appropriate requirements. One 
course must be a seminar; each semester the department will 
designate which courses will be offered as seminars. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the Department to 
apply for admission to the honors program in English. To be 
graduated with the designation "Honors in English," they must 
meet minimum requirements listed on page 8, and complete 
satisfactorily the requirements for English majors, and in addi- 
tion complete the requirements for English 388. For additional 
information members of the staff should be consulted. 

137 



English 

11. Composition Review.* Essentials of standard usage and the basic 
principles of composition; frequent exercises. No credit. STAFF 

110. English Composition.** Training in expository writing, frequent 
essays based upon readings in literature. Staff 

160. Survey of Major British Writers. Eight to ten writers representing 
different periods and genres; primarily lecture. Staff 

165. Studies in Major British Writers. Three to five writers representing 
different periods; primarily discussion, with frequent short papers. Lim- 
ited enrollment. Staff 

170. Survey of Major American Writers. Nine to eleven writers repre- 
senting different periods and genres; primarily lecture. STAFF 

175. Studies in Major American Writers. Three to five writers repre- 
senting different periods; primarily discussion, with frequent short papers. 
Limited enrollment. STAFF 

Journalism and Writing 

270. Introduction to Journalism. Survey of the fundamental principles 
of news-gathering and news-writing; study of news and news values, with 
some attention to representative newspapers. Mr. Shaw 

272. Editing. A laboratory course in copy-editing, headline-writing, 
typography, and make-up; includes both newspaper and magazine edit- 
ing. P-270. Mr. Shaw 

276. Advanced Journalism. Intensive practice in writing various types 
of newspaper stories, including the feature article. Limited to students 
planning careers in journalism. P-270. Mr. Shaw 

278. History of Journalism. A study of the development of American 
journalism and its English origin; detailed investigations of representative 
world papers. Mr. Shaw 

284. The Essay. Primarily for those interested in writing for publication, 
with concentration on writing various types of essays. Admission by 
consent of the instructor. Mr. Shaw 

285. Poetry Workshop. (V2 per semester). A laboratory course in the 
writing of verse. Study of poetic techniques and forms as well as works of 
contemporary poets. Frequent individual conferences. 



* Proficiency in the use of the English language is recognized by the Faculty as a re- 
quirement in all departments. A composition condition, indicated by cc under the grade 
for any course may be assigned in any department to a student whose writing is unsatis- 
factory, regardless of previous credits in composition. Also the composition of all rising 
juniors, both Wake Forest students and transfers, is examined for proficiency. The writing 
of Wake Forest students is checked during their last course in sophomore English; that of 
transfers is checked during the orientation period each fall. For removal of a composition 
condition the student is required to take English 11 or repeat English 110 without credit 
during the first semester for which he registers following the assignment of the cc. Since 
English 11 is not taught in the summer terms, a summer school student needing to remove 
a composition condition may repeat English 110 without credit. Removal of the deficiency 
is prerequisite to graduation. 

** Prerequisite for all other courses in English unless the composition requirement is 
waived. 

138 



English 

286. The Short Story. A study of the fundamental principles of short 
fiction writing; constant practice in writing, extensive study of short 
story form. Admission by consent of the instructor. Mr. Shaw 

Advanced Courses in Literature and Language* 

310. Introduction to Medieval Literature. Important works, exclusive 
of Chaucer. Consideration of literary genres, themes, religious and 
philosophical background. (A) Mr. Shorter 

315. Chaucer. Emphasis on The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and 
Criseyde, with some attention to long minor poems. Consideration of 
literary, social, religious and philosophical background. Mr. Shorter 

320. English Drama to 1642. English drama from its beginning to 1642, 
excluding Shakespeare. Representative Cycle plays, Moralities, Eliza- 
bethan and Jacobean tragedies, comedies, and tragi-comedies. (A) 

Mr. Bonnette 
323. Shakespeare. Twelve representative plays illustrating Shakespeare's 
development as a poet and dramatist. Mr. FOSSO 

325. Renaissance and Seventeenth Century. Selected prose and poetry, 
1500-1660, exclusive of Milton. Emphasis on Spenser and Donne, cul- 
tural backgrounds and stylistic transformations. (A) Mr. Fosso 
327. Milton. The poetry and selected prose of John Milton, with an em- 
phasis on Paradise Lost. Mr. Roman 
330. English Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Representative poet- 
ry and prose, exclusive of the novel, 1700-1800, drawn from Addison, 
Steele, Defoe, Swift, Pope, Johnson, Boswell, Goldsmith, and Burns. Con- 
sideration of cultural backgrounds and significant literary trends. 

Mr. Kenion 

332. Satire. The nature of the satiric form and the satiric spirit as re- 
vealed through reading and critical analysis of significant examples, 
mostly English and American. (A) Mr. Kenion 

335. Eighteenth Century Fiction. Primarily the fiction of Defoe, Rich- 
ardson, Fielding, Smollett, Sterne, and Austen. Mr. Lovett 
350. Romantic Poets. A review of the beginnings of romanticism in 
English literature, followed by study of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, 
Keats, and Shelley; collateral reading in the prose of the period. 

Mr. Wilson 

353. The Nineteenth Century English Novel. Representative major 
works by Dickens, Eliot, Thackeray, Hardy, the Brontes, and others. 
Lectures and discussion. Mr. Carter 

354. Victorian Poetry. A study of Tennyson, Browning, Hopkins, and 
Arnold or another Victorian poet. Mr. JOHNSTON 
360. Studies in Victorian Literature. Selected topics, such as develop- 
ment of genres, major texts, cultural influences. Readings in poetry, fic- 
tion, autobiography and other prose. Mr. Carter, Mr. Johnston 



* Courses marked (A) are normally offered in alternate years. 

139 



English 

362. Blake, Yeats, and Thomas. Reading and critical analysis of the 
poetry of Blake, Yeats, and Dylan Thomas; study of the plays of Yeats 
and his contemporaries in the Irish Renaissance, especially Synge and 
Lady Gregory. (A) Mr. Wilson 

364. Literary Criticism. Review of the beginnings of literary criticism, 
followed by a study of the principal twentieth century critical approaches 
to literature. (A) Mr. POTTER 

365. Twentieth Century English Novelists. A study of Conrad, Law- 
rence, Joyce, Forster, Woolf and later English novelists with attention 
to the social and intellectual background. Mr. Lobb 

367. Twentieth Century Poetry. Selected American and British poets 
from 1900 to 1965. Miss Phillips 

369. Modern Drama. Modern drama from its late nineteenth century 
naturalist beginnings to the contemporary existentialist-absurdist theater. 

Mr. Bonnette 

372. American Romanticism. Writers of the mid-nineteenth century 
including Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne and Melville. Mr. Meyer 

374. Intellectual and Social Movements in American Literature to 1865. 
Selected topics such as Puritanism, the Enlightenment, Transcendental- 
ism, and romanticism to be focused on the mid-nineteenth century. (A) 

Mr. Meyer 

376. American Poetry from 1855 to 1900. The poetry of Whitman, Mel- 
ville, Dickinson and Stephen Crane. (A) Miss Phillips 

378. Literature of the South. The aesthetic, philosophical, and socio- 
logical dimensions of the best literature of the South, from the colonial 
to the contemporary period. Writers to include the regional humorists, 
Faulkner, Ransom and Williams. Mr. Milner 

380. American Fiction from 1865 to 1915. To include such writers as 
Twain, James, Howells, Crane, Dreiser, Wharton, and Gather. (A) 

Mr. Gossett 

382. Modern American Fiction, 1915 to the Present. To include such 
writers as Lewis, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Steinbeck, Wolfe, 
Wright, Katherine Anne Porter, Mailer, Bellow, Malamud, Flannery 
O'Connor, Baldwin, and Styron. Mr. Gossett 

386. Directed Reading. A tutorial in an area of study not otherwise 
provided by the English department; granted upon departmental ap- 
proval of petition presented by a qualified student. STAFF 

388. Honors Course in English. A conference course centering upon a 
special reading requirement and a thesis requirement. For senior 
students wishing to graduate with "Honors in English." Mr. Potter 

390. The Structure of English. An introduction to the principles and 
techniques of structural linguistics applied to contemporary American 
English. Miss McCaskey 

140 



German 

Courses for Graduate Students* 

(Note: Not every course listed in this section will be given 
every year, but at least four will be offered each regular aca- 
demic year, and normally two will be offered in the summer 
session. ) 

415. Studies in Chaucer. Mr. Shorter 
419. English Drama, 1580-1642. 

421. Studies in Spenser. Mr. Fosso 
425. Studies in Seventeenth Century English 

Literature. Mr. Fosso 

435. The Major Augustans. Mr. Kenion 

443. The Nineteenth Century English Novel. Mr. Carter 
445. English Poetry of the Nineteenth and Twentieth 

Centuries. Mr. Wilson 

455. Studies in American Fiction. Mr. Gossett 

457. American Poetry. Miss Phillips 

491, 492. Thesis Research. Staff 

FINE ARTS 

(See Interdepartmental courses on page 147.) 

GERMAN 

Professors Fraser, O'Flaherty 
Associate Professor Sanders 
Assistant Professors Sellner, West 
Instructor Place 

A major in German requires nine semester courses beyond 
German 111-112, and should include 281 and 285. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to 
apply for admission to the honors program in German. To be 
graduated with the designation "Honors in German," they must 
meet minimum requirements listed on page 8, and complete 
a senior research project and pass a comprehensive examination. 



For course descriptions, see the Graduate Bulletin. 

141 



German 

They are then graduated with the designation of "Honors in 
German." For additional information members of the staff 
should be consulted. 

Attention is called to the exchange program which Wake 
Forest University maintains with the Free University of Berlin 
(see page 36). 

Ill, 112." Elementary German. This course covers the principles of 
grammar and pronunciation and includes the reading of simple texts. 
Lab — 1 hr. 

152. Intermediate German. The principles of grammar are reviewed; 
reading of selected prose and poetry. Open only to students who have 
completed three years of high school German. Lab — 1 hr. 

153. Intermediate German. The principles of grammar are reviewed; 
reading of selected prose and poetry. Lab — 1 hr. P-lll, 112. 

211, 212. Introduction to German Literature. The object of this course 
is to acquaint the student with masterpieces of German literature. Par- 
allel reading and reports. P-152 or 153. 

217. Conversation and Phonetics. A course in spoken German emphasiz- 
ing facility of expression. Considerable attention is devoted to phonetics. 
P-152 or 153 or equivalent. 

218. Composition and Grammar Review. A review of the fundamentals 
of German grammar, with intensive practice in translation and com- 
position. P-152 or 153 or equivalent. 

219. Advanced Composition. A study of advanced grammar and com- 
position. English texts will be translated into German in addition to 
free composition in German. P-218 or equivalent. 

220. German Civilization. A survey of contemporary German culture, 
including a study of its historical development in broad outline. The 
course is conducted in German. P-217 or consent of instructor. 

249. Old High German and Middle High German Literature. The study 
of major writers and works from these two areas emphasizes major 
writings of the chivalric period. P-211, 212 or equivalent. 

250. Renaissance, Reformation and Baroque German Literature. A 
study of major writers and works from the post-chivalric period to ap- 
proximately 1700. P-211, 212 or equivalent. 

253. Eighteenth Century German Literature. A study of major writers 
and works of the Enlightenment and Sturm und Drang. P-211, 212 or 
equivalent. 

263. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century (I). Poetry, prose, 
dramas and critical works from approximately 1795 to 1848. P-211, 212 
or equivalent. 

142 



History 

264. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century (II). Readings from 
the beginnings of Poetic Realism to the advent of Naturalism. P-211, 212 
or equivalent. 

270. Directed Readings in German Literature. Studies in literature not 
ordinarily read in other courses. Open only to majors with at least four 
courses of German beyond 212. Participation with consent of Chairman. 
281. Seminar: Twentieth Century Prose. Intensive study of certain 
works by Thomas Mann, Hesse, and Kafka, plus considerable outside 
reading. P-211, 212 or equivalent. 

285. Seminar: Goethe. Faust Part I will be studied in class. Parallel 
readings in other works by Goethe will be assigned. P-211, 212 or 
equivalent. 

288. Honors Course in German. A conference course in German litera- 
ture. A major research paper is required. Designed for candidates for 
departmental honors. 

HISTORY 

Professors Covey, Gokhale, Perry, Smiley, Stroupe, 

*Tillett, Yearns 
Associate Professors Barnett (Chairman), Barefield, 

Berthrong, Hendricks, McDowell**, Mullen, J. H. 

Smith, Zuber 
Assistant Professors Hadley, Sinclair 
Instructors Platte, Van Meter 

The History major consists of nine semester courses. It must 
include History 211, two courses in U. S. history, two courses in 
European history and one course in non-western history. No 
more than two courses from History 111, 112, 113 may be 
counted toward the major. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to 
apply for admission to the honors program in History. To be 
graduated with the designation "Honors in History," they must 
meet minimum requirements listed on page — , complete satis- 
factorily History 287, 288, and pass a comprehensive written 
examination. For additional information members of the staff 
should be consulted. 

Students contemplating graduate study should plan to take 
required and general survey courses early in their college 
careers, should include the course in Historiography, and should 



* Absent on leave, Fall 1973. 
** Absent on leave, 1973-74. 



143 



History 

acquire a reading knowledge of one modern foreign language 
(preferably French, German or Russian) for the M.A. degree 
and two for the Ph.D. degree. For information regarding the 
Master of Arts degree in History at Wake Forest University 
consult the Bulletin of the Graduate School. 

111. Europe from the Renaissance to 1789. A survey. Staff 

112. Europe from 1789 to 1914. A survey. Staff 

113. Europe and the Twentieth Century World. A survey from 1914 to 
the present. Staff 

151, 152. The United States. Political, social, economic, and intellectual 
aspects. 151: before 1865; 152: after 1865. Staff 

211. Seminar. Offered by members of the staff on topics of their choice. 
A paper is required. STAFF 

215, 216. The Ancient World. Critical focus on the Greeks in the fall, 
and Romans in the spring, but in global context of paleolithic to medieval; 
psychological-philosophical stress. Mr. Covey 

222. The Renaissance and Reformation. Europe from 1300 to 1600. 
Social, cultural, and intellectual developments stressed. 

Mr. Barefield 

240. Afro-American History. The role of Afro-Americans in the develop- 
ment of the United States with particular attention to African heritage, 
forced migration, Americanization, and influence. Mr. Smith 

264. Economic History of the United States. The economic development 
of the United States from colonial beginnings to the present. Mr. Perry 

265. American Diplomatic History. An introduction to the history of 
American diplomacy since 1776, emphasizing the effects of public opinion 
on fundamental policies. Mr. Perry 

271. Colonial Latin America, 1492-1825. Cultural configurational ap- 
proach. Mr. Covey 

286. Directed Reading. A project in an area of study not otherwise avail- 
able in the History department; permitted upon departmental approval of 
petition presented by a qualified student. 

287, 288. Honors Course in History. A two-semester sequence of semi- 
nars on problems of historical synthesis and interpretation. Designed for 
seniors who are candidates for distinction in history. STAFF 

311, 312. Social and Intellectual History of Modern Europe. Intellectual 
trends in Western European Civilization. Fall: seventeenth and eighteenth 
centuries; spring; nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Mr. BERTHRONG 

144 



History 

315. The Middle Ages. A survey of European history, 400-1300, stress- 
ing social and cultural developments. Mr. Barefield 

316. France and England in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries. The 
structure of society, the nature of law, church-state relations, intellectual 
developments. P-315 or permission of instructor. Mr. Barefield 

319, 320. Germany. Fall: origins of the German nation and the rise of 
Prussia in a context of particularism. Spring: from the Reich of Bis- 
marck to divided Germany. Mr. McDowell 

323, 324. England. A political and social survey, with some attention to 
continental movements. Fall: to 1603; spring: 1603 to present. 

Messrs. Barnett, Hadley 

325. Tudor and Early Stuart England. A constitutional and social study 
of England from 1485 to 1641. (Not offered 1974-75) Mr. Barnett 

329, 330. Modern England. Political, social, economic, and cultural 
history of England since 1714. Fall: to 1815; spring: since 1815. (Not 
offered fall, 1973) Mr. Hadley 

331, 332. Russia. Primarily political, with some attention to cultural 
and social developments. Fall: the Russian Empire; spring: the Soviet 
Union. Mr. Tillett 

333. European Diplomatic History, 1848-1914. Research-discussion semi- 
nar, with emphasis on topics from the Bismarck era. Mr. Mullen 

335, 336. Twentieth Century Europe. Emphasis on international ques- 
tions and the changing position of Europe in the world. Fall: 1914 to 
1939; spring: 1939 to the present. (Not offered 1974-75) Mr. McDowell 

341, 342. History and Civilization of Southeast Asia. From the earliest 
times to the present; special attention to religion, social organization, 
economy, literature, art and architecture. Mr. Gokhale 

343. Imperial China. Development of traditional institutions in Chinese 
society to 1644; attention to social, cultural and political factors, em- 
phasizing continuity and resistance to change. Mr. Sinclair 

344. Modern China. Manchu Dynasty and its response to the Western 
challenge; 1911 Revolution; warlord era and rise of the Communists; 
Chinese Communist society; cultural Revolution. Mr. Sinclair 

345. 346. History and Civilization of South Asia. An introduction to the 
history and civilization of South Asia. Emphasis on historical develop- 
ments in the social, economic, and cultural life. (Not offered 1974-75) 

Mr. Gokhale 

349, 350. East Asia. An introduction to the social, cultural and political 
development of China, Japan, and Korea. Fall: to 1600; spring: since 
1600. (Not offered 1974-75) Mr. Sinclair 

351, 352. Social and Intellectual History of the United States. The 
relationship between ideas and society. Religion, science, education, 
architecture and immigration are among the topics discussed. Mr. Zuber 

145 



History 

353. Colonial English America, 1582-1774. Determinative episodes, fig- 
ures, allegiances, apperceptions, and results of the period, organically 
considered. Mr. Covey 

354. Revolutionary and Early National America 1763-1820. The Ameri- 
can Revolution, its causes and effects, the Confederation, the Constitution, 
and the new nation. Mr. Hendricks 

355. The Westward Movement. The role of the frontier in United States 
history, 1763-1890. Mr. Smiley 

356. Jacksonian America, 1820-1850. The United States in the age of 
Jackson, Clay, Calhoun and Webster. A biographical approach. 

Mr. Hendricks 

357. The Civil War and Reconstruction. The political and military events 
of the war and the economic, social, and political readjustments which 
followed. Mr. Yearns 

358. U. S. from Reconstruction to World War I. National progress and 
problems during an era of rapid industrialization. Mr. YEARNS 

359. Twentieth Century America, I. The transition of America from 
World War I to the eve of World War II with special emphasis on the 
"Roaring Twenties" and the New Deal. Mr. Smith 

360. Twentieth Century America, II. Recent United States development 
from Pearl Harbor to the eve of the present. Mr. Smith 

362. American Constitutional History. Origins of the constitution, the 
controversies involving the nature of the union, and constitutional read- 
justments to meet the new American industrialism. Mr. Yearns 

363, 364. The South. Geography, population elements, basic institutions, 
and selected events. Mr. Smiley 

365. Women in American History. A survey of the roles and activities 
of women in America, with emphasis upon selected individuals. 

Mr. Smiley 

367, 368. North Carolina. Selected phases of the development of North 
Carolina from colonial beginnings to the present. Fall: to 1789; spring: 
since 1789. Mr. Stroupe 

372. Cities in History. Case studies of selected cities of Asia, Europe, 
and America in their economic, social, political and cultural roles in the 
historical development of their respective regions. (Not offered 1974-75) 

Staff 

391, 392. Historiography. The principal historians and their writings 
from ancient times to the present. Fall: European historiography; spring: 
American historiography. Mr. Perry 

Courses for Graduate Students* 
411, 412. Seminar in Modern European History. Mr. Tillett 



For course descriptions, see the Graduate Bulletin. 

146 



Interdepartmental Courses 



442. Seminar in Southeast Asia. Mr. Gokhale 

445. Traditional India. Mr. Gokhale 

447. Seminar on Modern India. Mr. Gokhale 

451, 452. Seminar in United States History. Mr. Smiley 

463, 464. American Foundations. A survey of the European 
heritage and colonial environment which developed into the 
American culture of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth 
centuries. A cooperative program of Wake Forest University, Old 
Salem, and Reynolda House, Inc. Lectures provide a continuity 
of theme, while Old Salem and other historic sites provide oppor- 
tunities for giving history a visual dimension. A research project 
is required. Summer. Mr. Covey, Staff 

465. Historic Preservation and Museum Training I. A study 
of the techniques and theory of interpreting history through 
artifacts, restorations, reconstructions, and craft and other 
demonstrations. Mr. Hendricks 

466. Historic Preservation and Museum Training II. A con- 
tinued study of the history museum including the development 
of the museum concept, the management of historic sites, the 
role of the local historical society, the training of museum per- 
sonnel, and techniques of display and presentation. 

Mr. Hendricks 

471, 472. Historic Site and Museum Internship. Practical ex- 
perience working in an approved preservation project or mu- 
seum (i.e. Historic Bethabara, Historic Winston, Old Salem, 
Reynolda, or other such facilities) under the supervision of the 
director of the Historic Preservation and Museum Training Pro- 
gram. Mr. Hendricks 

481, 482. Directed Reading. Staff 

491, 492. Thesis Research. Staff 

INTERDEPARTMENTAL COURSES 

Humanities 

111. In Introduction to Music, Art, and Theatre: An Interdisciplinary 
Approach. A study of the interrelationship of Music, Art, and Theatre, 
designed to foster a deeper understanding and pleasure. Students will 
be expected to attend recommended concerts, art exhibits, plays, and 

147 



Mathematics 



other appropriate activities. Staff provided from the departments of 
Music, Art, Speech Communication and Theatre Arts. 

213. Studies in European Literature. A study of approximately 12 
works in translation taken from European literature. 

214. Contemporary Fiction. A study of contemporary European and 
Latin American fiction in translation. 

215. Germanic and Slavic Literature. A study of approximately 12 
works in translation taken from Germanic and Slavic literature. (Of- 
fered in alternate years) 

216. Romance Literature. A study of approximately 12 works in trans- 
lation taken from Romance literatures. (Offered in alternate years) 

250. Discovering the Visual and Verbal Modes of the Twentieth Century. 
An exploration of the ideas, values and feeling found in the Art and 
Literature of representative twentieth century figures: Kandinsky, 
Stevens, Picasso, Kafka, Leger, Beckett, Klee, Ionesco, Pollock, Faulkner, 
Chagall, Barth, and others. 

350. What the Arts Have Been Saying Since 1800. An experiment in 
developing interpretive judgment and insight, regarding music, painting, 
and literature as articulations of frontier consciousness of the period, 
held in Reynolda House. 

373. France in the Thirties: Literature and Social Consciousness. A 
study- in English of Malraux, Artaud, Giraudoux, and Breton. 

374. French Literature in the Mid-Twentieth Century. A study of the 
literature of the forties and fifties and its evolution from "commitment" 
to "disengagement." Authors read will include Sartre, Camus, Beckett, 
Robbe-Grillet, Ionesco, Duras, Sarrante. 

375. The French Theater Between 1930 and 1960: Theory and Practice. 
Study of works by Giraudoux, Cocteau, Anouilh, Sartre, Camus, Beckett, 
Ionesco, Genet. 



Social Sciences 

151. Introduction to the Social and Behavioral Sciences. An interde- 
partmentally taught course which examines (a) the common elements 
and differences in method and philosophy of Anthropology, Economics, 
Politics, Psychology and Sociology, and (b) a series of universally 
important and contemporary issues facing man such as war, minority 
groups and technology and its effects. This course will be open to 50 
freshman and sophomore students. 

381, 382. Interdisciplinary Study and Research in Developing Areas. 
This course, designed to introduce students to problems facing develop- 
ing areas, includes directed studies, intensive field research, and data 
analysis. 

148 



Mathematics 



MATHEMATICS 

Professors Gentry, Sawyer, Seelbinder 

Visiting Professor Brauer 

Associate Professors Baxley, Howard, Gaylord May, 

Graham May, Waddill 
Assistant Professors Carmichael, Hayashi, 

Kuzmanovich, Scott 

A major in mathematics requires ten courses. 

A student must include courses 111, 112, 121 and seven courses 
numbered 200 or above. These seven upper level courses must in- 
clude 211, 221 and at least two 300-level courses. A prospective 
teacher in the education block may take 231 in lieu of 211. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to 
apply for admission to the honors program in Mathematics. To 
be graduated with the designation "Honors in Mathematics," 
they must meet minimum requirements listed on page 8, and 
complete satisfactorily a senior research paper and pass a com- 
prehensive oral and written examination. For additional infor- 
mation members of the staff should be consulted. 

105. Pre-Calculus Mathematics. Selected topics deal with the structure 
of number systems and the elementary functions. Not to be counted on 
major in Mathematics. 

Ill, 112. Calculus with Analytic Geometry I, II. Differential and in- 
tegral calculus and the basic concepts of analytic geometry. No student 
will be allowed credit for both 116 and 111. Lab. — 2 hrs. 
115, 116. Finite Mathematics with Calculus I, II. Logic, sets, probability 
matrices, linear programming, markov chains, theory of games and 
concepts from differential and integral calculus. No student will be al- 
lowed credit for both 116 and 111. Lab — 2 hrs. 

121. Linear Algebra. Vectors and vector spaces, linear transformations 
and matrices, linear groups and determinants. 

155. Introduction to Fortran Programming. (V2 per sem.) Basic FOR- 
TRAN programming. Lecture and laboratory V2 semester. Graded on 
Pass/ Fail basis. Lab — 2 hrs. 

157. Elementary Probability and Statistics. Probability and distribution 
functions; means and variances; sampling distributions. One who takes 
this course may not receive credit for Soc. 380. 

211. Advanced Calculus I. Limits and continuity, differentiation and 
integration, implicit and inverse function theorems. P-121. 
221. Modern Algebra I. An introduction to modern abstract algebra 
through the study of groups, rings, integral domain and fields. P-121. 

149 



Mathematics 



231. Euclidean Geometry. Postulates, definitions, theorems and models 
of Euclidean geometry. 

233. Elementary Topology. Topology in metric spaces. Continuity, com- 
pactness, sequences, uniform covergence, applications to analysis. 

251. Ordinary Differential Equations. Linear equations with constant 
coefficients, linear equations with variable coefficients, existence and 
uniqueness theorems for first order equations. P-112. 

253. Operations Research. Mathematical models and optimization tech- 
niques. Studies in allocation, simulation, queuing, scheduling and net- 
work analysis. P-lll, P-115 or equivalent. 

256. Programming Languages. FORTRAN IV, COBOL, and Assembly 
languages. Advanced computer techniques. P-Mathematics 155 or equiva- 
lent. 

301S. Basic Concepts of Algebra for Teachers. Number systems and 
elementary mathematical structures. Not for credit toward the M.A. 
degree in Mathematics. 

302S. Basic Concepts of Geometry for Teachers. Euclidean Geometry 
with a brief introduction to non-Euclidean geometries. Not for credit 
toward the M.A. degree in Mathematics. 

303S, 304S. Elementary Analysis for Teachers I, II. Concepts from 
finite mathematics and differential and integral calculus. Not for credit 
toward the M.A. degree in Mathematics. 

311. Advanced Calculus II. Sequences and series, uniform convergence, 
the Stieltjes integral, power series and Fourier series. P-211. 

317. Complex Analysis I. Analytic functions, Cauchy's theorem and its 
consequences, power series and residue calculus. P-211. 

322. Modern Algebra II. A continuation of modern abstract algebra 
through the study of additional properties of groups and fields and a 
thorough treatment of vector spaces. P-221. 

323, 324. Matrix Theory I, II. Basic concepts and theorems concerning 
matrices and real number functions defined on preferred sets of matrices. 
P-121. 

332. Non-Euclidean Geometry. Postulates, definitions, theorems, and 
models of Lobachevskian and Riemannian geometry. 

333. General Topology I. An axiomatic development of topological 
spaces. Includes continuity, connectedness, compactness, separation axioms 
and metric spaces. 

345, 346. Elementary Theory of Numbers I, II. Properties of integers, 
congruences, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, sums of squares, magic 
squares, applications to elementary mathematics, quadratic residues, 
arithmetic theory of continued fractions. 

348. Combinatorial Analysis. Enumeration techniques, including gen- 

150 



Mathematics 



erating functions, recurrence formulas, the principle of inclusion and 
exclusion, and Polya's theorem. P-221. 

351. Applied Analysis. Topics which have proven useful in the physical 
sciences, including vector analysis and complex analysis. 

352. Partial Differential Equations. The separation of variables tech- 
nique for the solution of the wave, heat, Laplace, and other partial dif- 
ferential equations, together with the related study of the Fourier trans- 
form and the expansion of functions in Fourier, Legendre, and Bessel 
series. 

353. Mathematical Models. Development and application of probabilistic 
and deterministic models. Emphasis will be given to constructing models 
which represent systems in the social, behavioral, and management sci- 
ences. P-Math 253 or Management Science 462. 

355. Numerical Analysis. A computer-oriented study of analytical 
methods in mathematics. Lecture and laboratory. P-112 and 155W or 
155, 251 recommended. 

357, 358. Mathematical Statistics I, II. Probability distributions, math- 
ematical expectation, sampling distributions, estimation and testing of 
hypotheses, regression, correlation and analysis of variance. P-112. 

361. Selected Topics. Topics in mathematics which are not considered in 
regular courses or which continue study begun in regular courses. Content 
varies. 

381. Independent Study. ( J /2 per sem.) Library and conference work. 

Courses for Graduate Students* 

411, 412. Real Analysis. 

415, 416. Seminar in Analysis. 

418. Complex Analysis II. 

421, 422. Abstract Algebra. 

423, 424. Seminar on Theory of Matrices. 

425, 426. Seminar in Algebra. 

433. General Topology II. 

435, 436. Seminar on Topology. 

437, 438. Seminar on Geometry. 

445, 446. Seminar on Number Theory. 

491, 492. Thesis Research. 



* For course descriptions, see the Graduate Bulletin. 

151 



Music 

MILITARY SCIENCE 

Major Joe P. Coffman, Professor 
Major Stephen J. Gamble, Assistant Professor 
Captain Edwin L. Earp, Assistant Professor 
Captain Jack M. Levitz, Assistant Professor 
Captain Joseph P. Hollis, Jr., Assistant Professor 
Captain Paul E. Cook, Jr., Assistant Professor 
Sergeant Major Wilhelm 0. Reter, Assistant 
Master Sergeant Charles E. Norton, Assistant 
Staff Sergeant David G. Tuttle, Assistant 

111, 112. First Year Basic. {}/% per 2 sems.) The role, organization and 
management of national defense; introduction to basic military skills 
and leadership. Academic subject also required.* Lab — l a /4 hrs. 

151, 152. Second Year Basic. ( x / 2 per 2 sems.) American military his- 
tory; methods of geographic location and reference; introduction to basic 
tactics; leadership application. P-lll, 112. Lab — l 1 /* hrs. 

211, 212. First Year Advanced. (Vs> per sem.) Leadership techniques; 
military teaching principles; small unit tactics and communications; ad- 
vanced leadership application. Academic subject also required.* P-151, 

152. Lab — 1% hrs. 

251, 252. Second Year Advanced. (Y 2 per sem.) Military operations, 
logistics, administration, and law; active duty orientation; supervision 
of Leadership Laboratory program. Academic subject also required.* 
P-211, 212. Lab — iy 4 hrs. 

MUSIC 

Professors T. McDonald, P. S. Robinson 
Associate Professor Huber (Chairman) 
Assistant Professor Giles 
Instructors Hoirup, C. W. Smith 
Part Time Instructors M. Angell, Berlin, Felmet, 
L. S. Harris, C. Johnson, Poindexter 

The major in Music requires eleven semester courses, one Edu- 
cation seminar in Music Literature, and four semesters of en- 
semble. The major will include: 155, 156, 157, 158, 213, 214, 233; 
a music elective from among the following: 218, 230, 231, 239, 



* One academic subject, to be approved in advance by the Professor of Military Science, 
is required for the freshman, junior, and senior years. This subject, either elective or 
required by the University, will be one which furthers the professional qualifications of 
the student as a prospective officer in the United States Army. 

152 



Music 

240, 241, 242 or 281; applied music 121-122 (one-half course per 
year), 123-124 (one-half course per semester), 221-222 (one-half 
course per semester), 223 or 224 (one-half course per semester), 
and Education 297. 

Students wishing to be certified to teach music in the public 
schools will need the following additional courses: Education 
291, 295, and 296, Brass and Percussion 121a, Woodwinds 121a, 
Strings 121a, and Voice Class 123a, and 4 other courses in 
Education. 

All Music majors are required to pass a keyboard proficiency 
examination prior to the beginning of the second semester of 
the junior year. Students should consult the Chairman of the 
Department of Music for details regarding keyboard proficiency 
requirements. 

Students specializing in church music will need the following 
additional courses: Education 295, Music 230 and 231. 

Music majors are required to attend all faculty and student 
recitals. Presentation of a public recital is also required. 

Highly qualified majors are invited to apply for admission to 
the honors program in Music. To be graduated with the desig- 
nation "Honors in Music," they must meet the uniform require- 
ments listed on page 8, and must complete one of the follow- 
ing requirements: (1) complete a senior research paper; (2) 
compose a large work for orchestra, band, chorus, piano, organ, 
or voice, and present it in a public performance; (3) present a 
lecture that will include an analysis of the music to be per- 
formed on the senior recital, and prepare two works indepen- 
dently, one to be performed on the senior recital. 

Music Theory 

101. Fundamentals. Music terminology, scales, keys, intervals, chords, 
rhythms, abbreviations, smaller forms. Primarily for students not 
majoring in music. 

155. Theory I. Ear training, sight singing, keyboard harmony. Tonal 
relations, primary triads, and inversions. Consonant diatonic harmonies 
of the major and minor modes. Lecture and laboratory sections. Lab — 
2 hrs. 

153 



Music 

156. Theory II. Continuation of Theory I. Ear training, sight singing, 
keyboard harmony. Introduction to dissonance, seventh chords and in- 
versions, accessory tones. Lecture and laboratory sections. P-155. Lab — 
2 hrs. 

157. Theory HI. Continuation of Theory II. Tonicization, modulation, 
modal alterations. Lecture and laboratory sections. P-156. Lab — 1 hr. 

158. Theory IV. Continuation of Theory III. Chromatic harmony, har- 
monic practices of nineteenth and twentieth century composers. Lecture 
and laboratory sections. P-157. Lab — 1 hr. 

213. Counterpoint. Basic voice-leading in the five species of counterpoint 
involving two to four voices in both strict and free styles. P-158. 

214. Form and Analysis. The harmonic and contrapuntal materials in 
small and large forms, with practical composition in some of the forms. 
P-213. 

218. Composition. Vocal and instrumental composition for solo and 
chamber groups using smaller basic forms. P-158. 



Music Literature 

102. Music Appreciation. Open to all students desiring a fuller under- 
standing of music. 

230. Seminar in Church Music. A survey of the great oratorios, can- 
tatas, anthems, hymns, and organ compositions of the church, with 
emphasis on their proper liturgical setting. 

231. Music in the Church. Function of the church musician and the 
relationship of his work to the overall church program. 

233. Music History. Survey of the history, literature, and meaning of 
music, aiming to stimulate intelligent hearing and understanding of music. 

239. Music — The Music of the Baroque. A study of the major composers, 
musical styles, forms and genre from 1600 to 1750. (Offered in alternate 
years.) 

240. Music — The Music of the Classic Age. A survey of composers, 
, genre, and styles from 1715 to 1827. (Offered in alternate years.) 



241. Music — The Music of the Romantic Period. A survey of major 
national styles, composers, forms, and genre of the nineteenth century. 
(Offered in alternate years.) 

242. Music — Twentieth Century Music. A survey of the major musical 
styles (including Jazz and Rock), genre, techniques, and media of con- 
temporary music from Debussy to the present. (Offered in alternate 
years.) 

281. Honors in Music. Independent study for highly qualified students 
who wish to graduate "with Honors in Music." 

154 



Music 
Music Education 

291. Education — Teaching of Music. Teaching and supervision of choral 
and instrumental music in the public schools, grades 1-12. P-158. 

295. Education — Conducting. Principles of choral and instrumental con- 
ducting as they relate to teaching music in the schools. P-158. 

296. Education — Scoring for Orchestra and Band. A study of instrumen- 
tation and scoring for the orchestra and band that includes practical ex- 
perience in scoring. P-158. 

297. Education — Music Literature Seminar. An examination of teaching 
materials from the standard repertory in the student's special area of 
interest. Advanced standing. Two class meetings and one tutorial hour 
per week. Tutorial fee. 

Ensemble 

Departmental ensembles are open to all students. Credit is 
earned on the basis of one-half course for two semesters of 
participation. 

107, 108. Opera Workshop. Study, staging, and performance of operatic 
works from the standard and contemporary literature. Enrollment by 
permission of instructor. 

109, 110. Orchestra. Study and performance of orchestral works from 
the classical and contemporary repertory. 

Ill, 112. Choir. Study and performance of sacred and secular choral 
literature. Chapel Choir membership by audition; Touring Choir selected 
from the Chapel Choir. 

113. Marching Deacons Band. Performs for most Wake Forest football 
games. Meets twice weekly during the fall term. No audition requirement. 

114. Concert Band. The study and performance of significant musical 
literature for wind instruments. Meets twice weekly during the spring 
term. Enrollment by permission of instructor. 

115. 116. Symphonic Wind Ensemble. Study and performance of standard 
musical literature for wind ensemble. Meets twice weekly. Regular per- 
formances on campus and off including an annual tour. Membership by 
audition only. 

117, 118. Jazz Ensemble. The study and performance of written and 
improvised jazz for large and small ensembles. One full and one sectional 
rehearsal weekly. Public performances. Membership by audition only. 

119, 120. Piano Ensemble. Study of the elements of accompanying and 
ensemble playing through class discussion and studio experience. 

155 



Music 

Applied Music 

Applied music courses are open to all college students with the 
consent of the instructor. Credit is earned on the basis of class 
time and weekly preparation: one-half course per year implies 
a half-hour of instruction weekly and a minimum of one hour of 
daily practice; one course per year (one-half course per semes- 
ter) implies an hour of instruction weekly and a minimum of 
two hours of daily practice. 

Piano 121a-124a. Class Piano (V2 P e r 2 sems.) Scales, chords, inversions, 
appropriate standard literature with emphasis on sight-reading, har- 
monization, simple transposition. Designed for the beginning piano stu- 
dent. 

Piano 121, 122. Bach, Two-Part Inventions; Beethoven, Sonata, Op. 14, 
No. 1; Chopin, Prelude, Op. 28, No. 17. Applied music fee. 

Piano 123, 124. Bach, Sinfonia; Beethoven, Sonata, Op. 10, No. 1; 
Chopin, Etude, Op. 10, No. 9. Applied music fee. 

Piano 221, 222. Bach, Well Tempered Clavier; Beethoven, Sonata, Op. 
27, No. 1; Brahms, Intermezzo, Op. 118, No. 2. Applied music fee. 
Piano 223, 224. Bach, English Suites; Beethoven, Sonata, Op. 31, No. 2; 
Copland, Passacaglia. Applied music fee. 

Organ 121, 122. Manual and pedal technique; clarity in contrapuntal 
playing; Bach's Eight Little Preludes and Fugues; hymn playing. Applied 
music fee. 

Organ 123, 124. Pedal scales; smaller preludes and fugues of Bach; 
chorale preludes; simple works of more modern composers; hymn playing. 
Applied music fee. 

Organ 221, 222. More difficult Bach preludes and fugues and chorale 
preludes; selected works by Mendelssohn, Franck, etc. Applied music fee. 

Organ 223, 224. Larger preludes and fugues of Bach; trio sonatas; select- 
ed modem composers of all schools: Widor, Vierne, Dupre, etc. Applied 
music fee. 

Voice 121a, 122a Voice Class. (V£ per 2 sems.). Introduction to the 
fundamental principles of singing, including concepts of breath control, 
tone, and resonance. 

Voice 121, 122, 123, 124; 221, 222, 223, 224. Technical studies in breath 
control, tone production, diction, and resonance. Significant vocal litera- 
ture — including English, Italian, German, and French art songs, operatic 
repertory, and oratorio and cantata repertory — will be studied by the 
student and will be selected to meet his developing technical abilities. 
Applied music fee. 

Voice 123a. Vocal Methods { l / 2 per sem.). An examination of various 
vocal methods, techniques, and literature used in group singing. 



156 



Philosophy 

Orchestra and Band Instruments 121, 122; 123, 124; 221, 222; 223, 224. 
Studies of progressive difficulty (for Flute, Clarinet, Oboe, Bassoon, Sax- 
ophone, Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Euphonium, Tuba, Violin, 
Viola, Cello, Double Bass, or Percussion) covering tone production, scales, 
transpositions, technical studies, solo and ensemble repertory, and band 
and orchestral literature. Applied music fee. 

Brass and Percussion 121a. Brass and Percussion Instruments Class. (Y 2 
per sem.) Fundamentals of playing and teaching brass and percussion 
instruments. 

Strings 121a. String Instruments Class. (y 2 per sem.) Fundamentals of 
playing and teaching all instruments of the string family. 

Woodwinds 121a. Woodwind Instruments Class. (Y 2 per sem.) Funda- 
mentals of playing and teaching all principal instruments of the wood- 
wind family. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Professor Helm 

Associate Professors Hester, Pritchard (Chairman) 

Assistant Professors Lewis, Vorsteg 

A major in philosophy requires nine semester courses. The 
semester courses must include 261 and either 161 or 271, two 
courses from the history sequence (201, 211, 222), and one 
course from each of the following: A(230, 231, 241, 242); B(279, 
285, 287); C(294, 295). 

The Spilman Philosophy Seminar, open to advanced stu- 
dents in philosophy, was established in 1934 through an endow- 
ment provided by Dr. Bernard W. Spilman. The income from 
the endowment is used for the seminar library, which now con- 
tains about 4,000 volumes. Additional support for the library 
and other departmental activities is provided by the A. C. Reid 
Philosophy Fund, which was established in 1960 by friends of 
the Department. The furniture in the library and seminar room 
was donated in honor of Mr. Claude Roebuck and Mr. and Mrs. 
W. A. Hough by their families. 

Two distinguished alumni of the College have made possible 
the establishment of a lectureship and a seminar. The late 
Guy T. Carswell of Charlotte, North Carolina, has endowed the 
Guy T. and Clara Carswell Philosophy Lectureship, and a gift 
from Mr. James Montgomery Hester of Long Beach, California, 
has established the James Montgomery Hester Philosophy 

157 



Philosophy 

Seminar. In addition, a lectureship bearing his name has been 
instituted in honor of Mr. Claude V. Roebuck. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to 
apply for admission to the honors program in Philosophy. To 
be graduated with the designation, "Honors in Philosophy," 
a student must submit an acceptable prospectus for an honors 
thesis by November for graduation in the spring semester or by 
May for graduation in the fall semester; must present a satis- 
factory paper based on the prospectus; and must show an ac- 
ceptable level of performance in a discussion of his thesis with 
his honors advisor and one other member of the department. 

151. Basic Problems of Philosophy. An examination of the basic con- 
cepts of several representative philosophers, including their accounts of 
the nature of knowledge, man, God, mind, and matter. 

161. Logic. An elementary study of the laws of valid inference, recog- 
nition of fallacies, and logical analysis. 

171, 172. Meaning and Value in Western Thought. A critical survey of 
religious and philosophical ideas in the Western World from antiquity 
to modern times. (Either 171 or 172 will satisfy the philosophy or 
religion requirement. Both 171 and 172 will satisfy both the philosophy 
and religion requirements. Choices will be determined at registration.) 

201. Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. A survey of major philosophers 
from the Presocratics to the late Medieval Scholastics. P-151 or 171 
or 172. 

211. Modern Philosophy. A survey of major philosophers from Descartes 
to Nietzsche. P-151 or 171 or 172. 

222. Contemporary Philosophy. A survey of major philosophers from 
Russell to Sartre. P-151 or 171 or 172. 

230. Plato. A detailed analysis of selected dialogues covering Plato's most 
important contributions to ethics, political philosophy, theory of knowl- 
edge, metaphysics, and theology. P-151 or 171 or 172. 

231. Aristotle. A study of the major texts, with emphasis on meta- 
physics, ethics, and theory of knowledge. P-151 or 171 or 172. 

241. Kant. A detailed study of selected works covering Kant's most 
important contributions to theory of knowledge, metaphysics, ethics, 
and religion. P-151 or 171 or 172. 

242. Hegel, Kierkegaard, and Sartre. An examination of selected sources 
embodying the basic concepts of Hegel, Kierkegaard, and Sartre, especial- 
ly as they relate to each other in terms of influence, development, and 
opposition. P-151 or 171 or 172. 

261. Ethics. A critical study of selected problems and representative 
works in ethical theory. P-151 or 171 or 172. 

158 



Physical Education 



271. Symbolic Logic. Basic concepts and techniques of modern deductive 
logic, beginning with the logic of truth functions and quantification theory. 
Attention will be given to advanced topics such as descriptions, classes, 
and number, and to issues in the philosophy of logic. 

279. Philosophy of Science. A systematic exploration of the conceptual 
foundations of scientific thought and procedure. P-151 or 171 or 172. 
285. Philosophy of Art. A critical examination of several philosophies 
of art, with emphasis upon the application of these theories to particular 
works of art. P-151 or 171 or 172. 

287. Philosophy of Religion. A systematic analysis of the logical struc- 
ture of religious language and belief, including an examination of re- 
ligious experience, mysticism, revelation, and arguments for the nature 
and existence of God. P-151 or 171 or 172. 

290. Readings in Philosophy. A discussion of several important works 
in philosophy or closely related areas. P-151 or 171 or 172. 

294. Seminar in Epistemological Problems. A senior course requiring a 
major research paper. P-151 or 171 or 172. 

295. Seminar in Metaphysical Problems. A senior course requiring a 
major research paper. P-151 or 171 or 172. 

297, 298. Seminar: Advanced Problems in Philosophy. Senior courses 
treating selected topics in philosophy. P-151 or 171 or 172. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Professor Barrow 

Associate Professor Ribisl 

Assistant Professors Casey, Crisp, Ellison, 

Hottinger, Rhea 
Instructors Burke, Boone, Earls, Klock, Vest, 

Williams 

The purpose of the Department of Physical Education is to 
organize, administer and supervise the following programs: (1) 
Required Physical Education Program consisting of condi- 
tioning activities, varied team and individual sports, special 
corrective and remedial instruction to all students with physical 
problems according to the individual's need, and to teach some 
basic information on posture and body mechanics, physiological 
principles, and practical health facts which must be observed 
to maintain a state of health and physical fitness. (2) Intra- 
mural Sports Program which allows all students to participate 
and specialize in sports which will be of lifelong benefit. (3) 
Supervised Recreation Program consisting of varied recrea- 
tional and leisure time activities. (4) Professional Curriculum 

159 



Physical Education 



Program which will offer the necessary training for those in- 
terested in the fields of Health, Physical Education, Recreation 
and Athletic Coaching. 

Required Physical Education 

Physical Education 111 and 112 are required of all freshmen 
and transfer students who have not complied with this require- 
ment. For those men enrolled in ROTC Physical Education 
111 and 112 requirement may be postponed until the sophomore 
year but must be completed by the end of that second year 
of attendance in Wake Forest University. Not more than four 
semesters of required or elective physical education may be 
counted toward graduation. 

Ill, 112. Physical Education. (Y 2 per 2 sems.) A basic course consisting 
of body mechanics, basic health and physiological principles, dance, 
exercise and sports designed to develop fundamental skills. Students' 
needs and interests will be met through controlled election of activities 
based upon standardized proficiency examination and/ or previous ex- 
periences. 

Ill, 112. Physical Education (Special). (V2 per 2 sems.) A course con- 
sisting of remedial instruction or limited activity for students with special 
problems, handicaps or medical excuses. 

Elective Physical Education 

For those students who wish to specialize in sports activities 
beyond the requirement, a varied sports program is offered. Any 
two of the courses listed below may be elected for ^ course 
credit toward graduation. Prerequisite, Physical Education 
111-112. 



Hours to be arranged 

159. Beginning Golf 

160. Intermediate Golf 

161. Beginning Tennis 

162. Techniques of Dance Move- 
ment 

163. Contemporary Dance 

164. Gymnastics 

165. Beginning Bowling 

166. Beginning and Inter- 
mediate Swimming 



167. 



168. 



Advanced Swimming; 
Beginning Scuba 
Life Saving; Water Safety 
Inst. Course 

169. Weight Training and 
Conditioning 

170. Handball; Squash Racquets 
172. Water Ballet; Synchronized 

Swimming 
Conditioning 
Intermediate Tennis 
Intermediate Bowling 
Skiing and Bowling 



173 
174 
175 
176. 



160 



Physical Education 



Courses for Major Students 

Students desiring to elect a major in Physical Education and 
Health and to satisfy the state requirements for a teaching cer- 
tificate must be of Junior Standing. Biology 111 and 112 will 
be required and the following 9 courses in Physical Education: 
221, W6, 222, 224, 251, 252, 258, 353, 357, 360, and 363. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to 
apply for admission to the honors program in Physical Educa- 
tion. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Physical 
Education," they must meet minimum requirements listed on 
page 8, participate satisfactorily in Physical Education 381, 
and pass a comprehensive written examination. Upon satisfac- 
tory completion of these requirements, they will be recom- 
mended for graduation with "Honors in Physical Education." 
For additional information members of the staff should be con- 
sulted. 

Physical Education major students who are considering grad- 
uate study should take course 381 as an elective. Education 291 
is to be taken by students completing requirements for a 
teaching certificate. 

211. Foundations of Health and Physical Fitness. A presentation of 
the physiological, psychological, and sociological foundations of personal 
health and physical fitness. 

W6. Methods and Materials in Aquatics, Recreational Sports and 
Games. Presentation of knowledge, skill and methods of teaching aquat- 
ics, recreational sports, and games of low organization. 

221. Methods and Materials in Gymnastics and Dance. Presentation of 
knowledge, skill and methods of teaching gymnastics, dance, conditioning, 
and weight training. 

222. Methods and Materials in Teaching and Coaching Team Sports. 
Presentation of knowledge, skill, and methods of teaching, coaching, and 
officiating team sports. 

224. Methods and Materials in Team and Individual Sports. Theory 
and practice in organization and teaching of selected team and individual 
sports included in a comprehensive physical education program. 

251. Principles of Physical Education. A general introductory course 
and orientation into physical education and its relation to general educa- 
tion and the present organization of society. 

252. Anatomy and Physiology. A course to provide students of physical 
education with a functional knowledge of the anatomic structure and 
physiologic function of the human body. 

161 



Physical Education 



258. Organization and Administration of Health and Physical Educa- 
tion. A course in problems and procedures in health and physical educa- 
tion and the administration of an interscholastic athletic program. 
353. Physiology of Exercise. This course presents the many effects of 
muscular activity on the processes of the body which constitute the 
scientific basis of Physical Education. 

357. Kinesiology and Adapted Physical Education. A study of the 
principles of human motion based on anatomical, physiological and 
mechanical principles, and the application of these principles along 
with other special considerations in developing a program for the 
atypical student. 

360. Evaluation and Measurement in Health and Physical Education. A 
course in measurement techniques and beginning statistical procedures to 
determine pupil status in established standards of health and physical 
education which reflect the prevailing educational philosophy. 
363. Personal and Community Health and Safety Education. A course 
presenting personal, family, and community health problems; a study of 
first aid, safety in the schools and treatment of athletic injuries. 

371. Motor Learning and Performance. Motor skill learning and per- 
formance are analyzed on the basis of psychological principles and con- 
cepts, with special reference to the nature of learning, characteristics 
of the learner and management of the learning environment. 

372. Motor Behavior in Early Childhood. A study of the psychomotor 
and perceptual motor development and behavior of children. 

381. Research in Physical Education. A study of the nature and purpose 
of research, and the methods and techniques used in its procedures. 
Standards are emphasized with respect to selecting, defining, and anal- 
yzing potential problems and preparing bibliographies and writing up 
research. 

382. Independent Study in Health and Physical Education. Library 
conferences and laboratory research performed on an individual basis. 

Courses for Graduate Students* 

451. Philosophical Bases of Physical Education. 

453. Advanced Physiology of Exercise. 

456. Advanced Evaluation and Measurement in Health, 

Physical Education, and Recreation. 
470. Curriculum in Health and Physical Education. 
475. Supervision of Health and Physical Education. 
480. Readings in Physical Education, Health, and Edu- 
cation. 
483. Seminar in Physical Education. 
491, 492. Thesis Research. 



* For course descriptions, see the Graduate Bulletin. 

162 



Physics 

PHYSICS 

Professors Turner, Brehme, Haven, Shields, 

G. P. Williams, Jr. 
Assistant Professor Kerr 

The program of courses for each student majoring in Physics 
will be determined through consultations with the student's 
major adviser. 

In addition to the courses prescribed by the College, the 
requirements for a B.S. Degree with a major in Physics are: 

1. Eight semester courses beyond introductory physics (Phys- 
ics 111-112) in the Department of Physics. 

2. Two courses in the Department of Chemistry, or Chemis- 
try 118. 

3. Mathematics 251 (Differential Equations). 

No student may be a candidate for a degree with a major in 
Physics unless he earns a grade of C or better in General Physics 
or is given special permission by the staff. A typical semester 
schedule is as follows: 

Freshman Year Sophomore Year 

Physics 111, 112 Physics 161, 162 

Mathematics 111, 112 Mathematics 251 

Language (2 courses) * General Requirements (5 courses) 

General Requirement (2 courses) 

Physical Education (Vfc course) 

Junior Year Senior Year 

Physics 343, 344 Physics 311, 312 

Physics 345, 346 Electives (6 courses) 

General Requirements (3 courses) 
Electives (2 courses) 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to 
apply for admission to the honors program in Physics. To be 
graduated with the designation "Honors in Physics," they must 
meet minimum requirements listed on page 8, and complete 
satisfactorily Physics 381 and pass a comprehensive written 
examination. They are then graduated with the designation 



* French, German or Russian is preferred. 

163 



Physics 

"Honors in Physics." For additional information members of 
the staff should be consulted. 

101, 102. Natural Philosophy. A study of the history, philosophy and 
social impact of the physical sciences. 

105. Descriptive Astronomy. An introductory study of the universe, 
from the solar system to the galaxies. 

Ill, 112. General Physics. The basic course, without calculus, for fresh- 
men and sophomores. Lab — 2 hrs. 

121, 122. General Physics with Calculus. A beginning physics course de- 
signed for those who expect to major in physics or chemistry. The topics 
covered are essentially the same as those in Physics 111-112, but the 
methods of calculus are introduced as the course progresses. Lab — 2 hrs. 
C-Math 111. 

161. Introductory Mechanics. The fundamental principles of mechanics. 
P-lll or 117, and Mathematics 111; or equivalent: Lab — 3 hrs. 

162. Introductory Electricity. The fundamental principles of electricity, 
magnetism and electromagnetic radiation. P-161, or equivalent. Lab — 
3 hrs. 

230. Electronics. Introduction to the theory and application of transis- 
tors and electronic circuits. P-162, or equivalent. Lab — 3 hrs. 

301, 302. Advanced General Physics. A course designed for science 
teachers. Credit is not allowed for graduate students in the department 
of Physics. Lab — 2 hrs. 

311. Mechanics. A senior level treatment of analytic classical mechanics. 
P-161, Mathematics 251. 

312. Electromagnetic Theory. A senior level treatment of classical 
electromagnetic theory. P-162, Mathematics 251. 

343, 344. Modern Physics. Application of the elementary principles of 
quantum mechanics to atomic and molecular physics. 

345, 346. Modern Physics Laboratory. i}/ 2 per sem.) The laboratory 
associated with Physics 343, 344. Lab — 3 hrs. 

351. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics. Introduction to classi- 
cal and statistical thermodynamics and distribution functions. 

352. Physical Optics and Spectra. A study of physical optics and the 
quantum treatment of spectra. 

381. Research. Library, conference and laboratory work performed on 
an individual basis. 

Courses for Graduate Students* 

412. Classical Mechanics. 

413. Electromagnetism. 



* For course descriptions, see the Graduate Bulletin. 

164 



Politics 

441, 442. Quantum Mechanics. 

452. Solid State Physics. 

455. Magnetic Properties of Solids. 

456. Seminar on Defects in the Solid State. 
461. Nuclear Physics. 

470. Statistical Mechanics. 

480. Theory of Relativity. 

485. Seminar in Theoretical Physics. 

491, 492. Thesis Research. 

POLITICS 

Professor Richards 
Professor of Asian Studies Gokhale 
Associate Professors Broyles, Fleer (Chairman)*, 
Moses, Reinhardt, Schoonmaker, Steintrager** 
Assistant Professors Sears, Thornton 
Instructor Baumgarth 

In its broadest conception, the aim of the study of politics is 
to understand the way in which policy for a society is formu- 
lated and executed, and to understand the moral standards by 
which policy is or ought to be set. This center of interest is 
often described alternatively as the study of power, of govern- 
ment, of the state, or of human relations in their political con- 
text. For teaching purposes, the study of politics has been di- 
vided by the Department into the following fields: 1) political 
philosophy, 2) comparative politics, 3) American politics, and 
4) international politics. Introductory courses in the first three 
of these -fields provide broad and flexible approaches to studying 
political life. 

Department Requirements for Major. The major in politics 
shall consist of nine full courses or their equivalent, of which one 
may be a winter term. These courses must include the following: 

a. A first course selected from: 

Politics 111. Introduction to Politics: Political Theory 
Politics 112. Introduction to Politics: Comparative Politics 
Politics 113. Introduction to Politics: American Politics 

* Absent on leave, Fall 1973. 
** Absent on leave, 1973-74. 

165 



Politics 

b. Any one introductory or advanced course in each of the four 
fields of the discipline. These courses must be restricted to 
non-seminar courses. 

c. One seminar in politics. Normally, a student will take no 
more than one seminar in each field and no more than three 
seminars overall. 

A minimum grade average of C on all full courses attempted 
in Politics is required for graduation. 

Honors in Politics. Highly qualified majors are invited by the 
department to apply for admission to the honors program in 
Politics. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Poli- 
tics," they must successfully complete Politics 284 and two 
seminar courses, and pass an examination. For additional in- 
formation members of the staff should be consulted. 

Social Science Division Requirement. A student who selects 
Politics to fulfill the social science division requirement must 
take one of the following for the first course: Politics 111, 112, 
or 113. The second course may be selected from any course in 
the Department. 

Introductory Courses 

A student must take one of the following as the first course 
in the Department. More than one may be taken. The order in 
which they are taken is immaterial. 

111. Introduction to Politics: Political Theory. Major systematic state- 
ments of the rules and principles of political life. Representative writers: 
Tocqueville, Dahl, Aristotle. Staff 

112. Introduction to Politics: Comparative Politics. Political processes 
and principles as applied to traditional, developing and mature states. 

Staff 

113. Introduction to Politics: American Politics. The nature of politics, 
political principles, and political institutions with emphasis on their 
application to the United States. Staff 

American Politics 

210. American Public Policy Analysis. Analysis of the substance of 
public problems and policy alternatives. Examination of why government 
pursues certain policies and the consequences of those policies THORNTON 

166 



Politics 

211. Political Parties. A systematic examination of political parties with 
particular attention given to party systems, internal organizations, the 
electoral function, and responsibilities for governing. Fleer 

212. Political Behavior. A study of the formation and expression of 
political opinions and the role of political participation in a democratic, 
representative system. Fleer 

213. Public Administration. Introduction to the study of public adminis- 
tration emphasizing policymaking in government agencies. THORNTON 

218. Legislative Behavior. A systematic examination of the composition, 
authority structures, external influences and procedures of legislative 
bodies in the United States. Fleer 

220. American Presidency. Emphasis on the office and the role. Contri- 
butions by contemporary presidents considered in perspective. THORNTON 

222. Urban Problems and Politics. Political structures and processes in 
American cities and suburbs as they relate to the social, economic, and 
political problems of the metropolis. Richards 

225. American Constitutional Law: Separation of Powers and the 
Federal System. An analysis of Supreme Court decisions affecting the 
three branches of the national government and federal-state relations. 

Richards 

226. American Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties. Judicial interpreta- 
tions of First Amendment freedoms, racial equality, and the rights of 
the criminally accused. Richards 

227. The Judicial Process. An analysis of the role of courts and the 
legal systems in the American political process. RICHARDS 

Comparative Politics 

231. Western European Politics. Analysis of the political systems of 
Great Britain, France, and Germany focusing primarily on the problem 
of stable democracy. Schoonmaker 

232. Comparative Communism: Eastern Europe. Ideological, structural 
and procedural aspects of the political systems of the Soviet Union and 
other Eastern European communist states. Moses 

234. Asian Thought and Politics. Political traditions and recent politics 
of major Asian nations. Reinhardt 

235. Revolution. A comparative study of socio-political revolution as a 
major mode of political conflict and change. Moses 

236. Latin American Politics. Structural and procedural aspects of the 
Latin American political systems, focusing particularly on problems of 
development. Moses 

237. Political Modernization. The modernization process in nonindus- 
trialized societies. Statements by modernizing elites analyzed. 

Schoonmaker 

167 



Politics 

238. History, Culture and Political Change. The study of how major 
cultures articulate or symbolize their existence either in history or moving 
through history. Special attention will be given to an evaluation of cur- 
rent concepts applied to political change. Reinhardt 

245. Government and Politics of South Asia. A study of the governments 
of India, Pakistan, Nepal, and Ceylon. Emphasis on political organiza- 
tions, party structures, and subnational governmental systems. GOKHALE 



International Politics 

251. Fundamentals of International Politics. Fundamental theoretical 
questions of international politics with special emphasis on existing 
international patterns. SEARS 

252. Current Problems in International Politics. An intensive study of 
one or more major problems of contemporary international politics. 

Sears 

254. American Foreign Policy. The principles and policies which 
characterize America's approach to the world in the contemporary period. 

Sears 



Political Philosophy 

271." Political Life and the Natural Order. Inquiry into the origins, 
basic characteristics, and limitations of political philosophy. Repre- 
sentative writers: Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli. Broyles, Steintrager 

272. Equality and Liberty. The arguments for and against democracy 
and republicanism, majority rule and the rights of man. Representative 
writers: Locke, Rousseau, J. S. Mill. Baumgarth, Broyles, Steintrager 

273. Radical Critiques of Political Society. Anarchist, socialist, and 
communist criticisms of and alternatives to existing political societies with 
special attention on such problems as utopianism and alienation. Repre- 
sentative writers: Sorel, Marx, Marcuse. 

Baumgarth, Broyles, Steintrager 

274. Political Philosophy, Revelation, and History. The nature and im- 
pact of general theories of history, both theological and secular, as they 
intersect with and affect political philosophy. Representative writers: 
St. Augustine, Hegel, Voegelin. Baumgarth, Steintrager 

275. Theory of the American Polity. Critical examination into the intent 
of the Framers and the nature of the American polity. Representative 
writers: The Federalists, Jefferson, Lincoln. Broyles 

276. Civic Life and Political Orders. Characteristic citizen qualities of 
alternative political orders described by political philosophers, poets, and 
statesmen. Representative writers: Aristotle, Kant, Shakespeare. Broyles 

168 



Psychology 
Honors and Independent Study 

284. Honors Study. A conference course with a facility committee. Read- 
ings in several politics fields are the basis for an extensive paper on a 
subject of special interest to the student. This course will be taken in the 
senior year by all candidates for department honors. Staff 

287. Independent Study. Internships, work-study projects, and other 
independent study programs. (See Department for details.) Staff 

Seminars in Politics 

291. Seminar in American Politics. Readings, research, and independent 
study on selected topics. Admission to the course is by permission of the 
Department only. Fleer, Richards, Thornton 

292. Seminar in Comparative Politics. Readings, research, and indepen- 
dent study on selected topics. Admission to the course is by permission 
of the Department only. Moses, Reinhardt, Schoonmaker 

293. Seminar in International Politics. Readings, research, and indepen- 
dent study on selected topics. Admission to the course is by permission 
of the Department only. SEARS 

294. Seminar in Political Philosophy. Readings, research, and indepen- 
dent study on selected topics. Admission to the course is by permission 
of the Department only. Baumgarth, Broyles, Steintrager 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors John E. Williams, Beck, Dufort 
Associate Professors Catron, Hills, Woodmansee 
Assistant Professors Bullard, Falkenberg, Patty, 

Richman 
Visiting Assistant Professor Compere 
Instructors Best, Frank B. Wood 

Psychology 151 is prerequisite to all courses. An average of C 
in Psychology courses is required at the time the major is elected. 
A major requires 9 semester courses in Psychology. The major 
student is required to take Psychology 151, 211, 212, 323; and 
one of the following courses — 321, 331, 332, 336, 338. In addi- 
tion, a major student may be required to take a half course or 
course in mathematics in addition to the mathematics being 
taken for the B.A. degree. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to 
apply for admission to the honors programs in Psychology. To 
be graduated with the designation "Honors in Psychology," they 
must meet minimum requirements listed on page 8, and com- 

169 



Psychology 

plete satisfactorily a special sequence of courses including Psy- 
chology 281, 282 and 284; and pass a comprehensive written 
and /or oral examination. For additional information members 
of the staff should be consulted. 

151. Introductory Psychology. A systematic survey of Psychology as the 
scientific study of behavior. Prerequisite to all other courses in Psy- 
chology. 

211, 212. Experimental and Quantitative Methods. Introduction to basic 
experimental methods and statistical techniques in the major content 
areas of psychology. Lab — 4 hrs. P-151. 

241. Psychology of Adjustment. Normal range of adjustment and per- 
sonality patterns emphasized. For non-majors. P-151. 

266. Developmental Psychology. Survey of physical, emotional, cognitive, 
and social development of the child from varied points of view. P-151. 

273. Psychology of Business and Industry. Psychological principles and 
methods applied to problems commonly encountered in business and 
industry. P-151. 

281, 282. Original Problems. (y 2 per sem.) Non-statistical characteristics 
of properly-designed research, followed by supervised research experience. 

281 and 282 normally are taken in that order; credit for either alone 
requires special permission. P-211, 212, instructor's consent. 

283. Directed Study (V2 or 1.) Student research performed under 
faculty supervision. P-151, instructor's consent. 

284. Honors Seminar. Seminar on selected problems in psychology; in- 
tended primarily for students in the departmental honors program. P-211, 
instructor's consent. 

321. Learning Theory and Research. Theoretical and experimental 
issues in the psychology of learning; no attempt is made to cover applica- 
tions to practical (e.g., educational) situations. P-151. 

323. History and Systems. The development of psychology from Aris- 
totle through recent systems of psychology, e.g., functionalism, behavior- 
ism, Gestalt. P-151. 

324, 325. Advanced Theory and Method. Seminar treatment of current 
problems. 324. Sensation and Perception. 325. Learning and Motivation. 
Typically, only one course offered in a given year. P-211, 212, instructor's 
consent. 

331. Comparative Psychology. Behavioral differences in animals at 
various levels of the phylogenetic scale. Lab — 2 hrs. P-151. 

332. Physiological Psychology. Physiological bases of behavior, with 
special reference to the nervous system. Lab — 2 hrs. P-151. 

336. Perception and the Cognitive Processes. Survey of theory and 
evidence related to problems of perception and thinking. P-151. 

170 



Religion 

338. Motivation of Behavior. Survey of basic motivational concepts and 
related evidence. P-151. 

344. Abnormal Psychology. Descriptive analysis of the major types of 
abnormal behavior with focus on organic, psychological, and cultural 
causes, and major modes of therapy. P-151. 

352. Psychological Appraisal. Psychological tests reviewed in theory, 
construction, and use. Lab — 2 hrs. P-151. 

356. Personality Theory and Research. Classical and contemporary 
theories of personality and related research studies. P-151. 

358. Survey of Clinical Psychology. An overview of the field of clinical 
psychology. P-344, senior or graduate standing, instructor's consent. 

359. Behavior Modification. The application of learning principles to 
the modification of behavior in a variety of subject populations and 
settings. P-151. 

362. Social Psychology. Research and issues in social psychology, in- 
cluding social perception, social motivational theory, attitude measure- 
ment and change, social learning, and small group behavior. P-151. 

363. Topics in Social Psychology. A treatment of selected topic (s) of 
current theoretical interest and/or social importance (e.g., environmental 
psychology, psychology of woman). P-151, instructor's consent. 

Courses for Graduate Students* 

415, 416. Research Design and Analysis in Psychology. 

427, 428. Behavior Theory. 

434. Biological Psychology. 

451. Theory and Practice of Psychological Testing. 

457. Experimental Approaches to Personality. 

465. Advanced Social Psychology. 

481. Contemporary Problems in Psychological Theory. 

483. Reading and Research in Psychology. 

491, 492. Thesis Research. 

RELIGION 

Professors E. W. Hamrick, Angell, Bryan, Griffin 
Associate Professors Dyer, Mitchell, Talbert 
Assistant Professors Collins, Horton 
Instructor R. C. Wood, Jr. 
Visiting Lecturer Lester 

The Department of Religion offers courses in instruction 
designed to give every student entering Wake Forest an oppor- 

* For course descriptions, see the Graduate Bulletin. 

171 



Religion 

tunity to acquire at least an introduction to the life, literature 
and the most important movements in the field of religion. It 
also seeks to give to students preparing for specialized service, 
as religious education directors, ministers, and missionaries, the 
foundational courses needed for further study. 

One course in Religion is required of all degrees. Any course 
offered by the Department will be accepted to meet the require- 
ment except those numbered 218, 237, 240, 282, 292, 346, and 
362. 

A Major in Religion requires a minimum of eight semester 
courses. 

Pre-seminary students are advised to include in their program 
of study, in addition to courses in Religion, courses in Philos- 
ophy, Ancient History, Public Speaking, and two languages, 
Greek or Latin, and German or French. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to 
apply for admission to the honors program in Religion. To be 
graduated with the designation "Honors in Religion," they 
must meet minimum requirements listed on page 8, and must 
apply to the Chairman of the Department for admission to the 
honors program. Normally this is to be done by February of 
the junior year. Upon completion of all the requirements, the 
candidate will be graduated with "Honors in Religion." For 
additional information members of the staff should be consulted. 

111. Introduction to the Old Testament. A survey of the Old Testa- 
ment designed to introduce the student to the history, literature and 
religion of the ancient Hebrews. 

112. Introduction to the New Testament. A survey of the literature of 
the New Testament in the context of early Christian history. 

113. The Hebrew Prophets. A study of the background, personal char- 
acteristics, function, message, contribution, and present significance of 
the Hebrew prophets. 

114. The Wisdom Literature. An introduction to the Wisdom Literature 
of the Old Testament with special attention to Proverbs, Job and 
Ecclesiastes. 

115. Jesus and the Synoptic Gospels. A study of Jesus' proclamation and 
activity in the light of modern critical research on the gospels. 

131. Basic Christian Ethics. The Biblical and theological foundations of 
the Christian Ethic and its expression in selected contemporary problems. 

172 



Religion 

160. Early Rabbinic Judaism. An introduction to the literature and 
thought of the early Rabbis. 

161. World Religions. The place of religion in life and the origin, nature, 
and accomplishments of the living religions of the world, studied from 
the historical point of view. 

164. History of Christianity. A rapid survey of the history of the 
Christian Church. 

166. American Religious Life. A study of the history, organization, 
worship and beliefs of American religious bodies, with particular atten- 
tion to cultural factors. 

171, 172. Meaning and Value in Western Thought. A critical survey of 
religion and philosophy in the Western world from antiquity to modern 
times. This course may count as Religion or Philosophy, but not both; 
choice determined at registration. 

173. An introduction to Christian Theology. A study of the ground 
structure and content of Christian belief. 

176. Theology and Modern Literature. A study of modern literary 
artists whose themes are primarily theological, from Hopkins to Tolkien. 

201. Phenomenology of Religion. A study of selected religious phenom- 
ena and of their meaning and function wtihin human existence. 

216. Poetic Literature of the Old Testament. A study of Hebrew Poetry 
— its types, its literary and rhetorical characteristics, and its significance 
in the faith of ancient Israel. 

218. Travel Seminar in the Mediterranean World. Travel and study 
in such countries as Greece, Italy, Turkey, Egypt, Lebanon, Syria and 
Israel. 

226. Early Christian Theologians: Paul. An introduction to the Pauline 
interpretation of Christianity and its place in the life of the early church. 

227. Early Christian Theologians: The Fourth Evangelist. An examina- 
tion of the Johannine interpretation of Jesus and Christian faith. 

236. Church and Community. An examination of the basic needs and 
trends of the contemporary community, especially the rural and subur- 
ban, in the light of the Christian norms for "the good community". 

237. Black Religion and Black Churches in America. Survey of litera- 
ture on these themes with an examination of the historical background 
and special attention to the contemporary area. 

238. Religion and Science. An analysis of the relationship between 
science and religion in world culture. 

240. Principles of Religious Education. A study of the theory and 
practice of religious education with emphasis on the basic foundations in 
religion and education. 

276. The Problem of Evil from Job to Shakespeare. A comparative 
analysis of the source and remedy of evil in Job, Aeschylus, Sophocles, 
Plato, Dante, and Shakespeare. 

173 



Religion 

282. Honors Course in Religion. A conference course designed to prepare 
the Honors student for a comprehensive exam or research project. 

292. Teaching of Religion. A study of the teaching of religion in church, 
school and community. This course may be credited as Education for 
those who are applicants for a state teacher's certificate in religious 
education. 

314. Introduction to Biblical Archaeology. A survey of the contributions 
of Near Eastern archaeology to Biblical studies. 

317. The Ancient Near East. A comparative study of ancient Near 
Eastern cultures and religions, with special emphasis on Israel's relation- 
ships with surrounding peoples. 

321. The Quest for the Historical Jesus. An investigation of the possi- 
bility and relevance of historical knowledge about Jesus through a con- 
sideration of the seminal "Lives of Jesus" since the eighteenth century. 

322. The Epistle to the Hebrews. Reading and discussion of Hebrews 
in the light of first century Judaism and Christianity. 

334. Christian Ethics and Contemporary Culture. A study of the en- 
counter between the Christian Ethic and the value systems implicit in 
certain social areas such as economics, politics, race and sex. 

335. The Leadership Role of the Clergy in a Technological Society. The 
use of internships and seminars whereby the student would be learning 
first-hand about established and emerging power-models for social change 
from within the multiple industrial corporations and the rich variety of 
public service organizations available in the Winston- Salem area. 

346. Theological Foundations of Religious Education. A study of theo- 
logical methodology, theories of learning and philosophies of education 
in terms of their implications for religious education. 

350. Psychology of Religion. An examination of the psychological ele- 
ments in the origin, development, and expression of religious experience. 

354. Religious Development of the Individual. A study of growth and 
development through childhood and adolescence to adulthood, with em- 
phasis on the role of the home and the church in religious education. 

355. Theology of Pastoral Care and Counseling. A study of the rela- 
tionship between theology and the purpose, theories and methods of 
pastoral care. Lester 

360. Hinduism. A study of the fundamental features of the Hindu 
tradition. 

361. Buddhism. A study of the Buddhist tradition, its fundamental 
features, and its impact on the cultures of Asia. 

362. Post-Biblical Judaism. The rise and development of post-Biblical 
(Rabbinic) Judaism until modern times. 

363. Hellenistic Religions. Consideration of available source materials, 

174 



Religion 

questions of method, and bibliography related to such Hellenistic re- 
ligions as the mysteries, Hellenistic Judaism and Gnosticism. 

365. History of Religions in America. A study of American religions 
from Colonial times until the present. 

373. The History of Christian Thought. A study of the history of 
Christian thought, beginning with its Hebraic and Greek backgrounds 
and tracing its rise and development to modern times. 

374. Contemporary Christian Thought. An examination of the major 
issues and personalities in modern theology. 

376. The Origins of Existentialism. A study of the principal 19th cen- 
tury figures who form the background for 20th century existentialism: 
Goethe, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy. 

Hebrew 

111, 112. Elementary Hebrew. A course for beginners in the classical 
Hebrew of the Bible with emphasis on the basic principles of Hebrew 
grammar and the reading of Biblical texts. Both semesters must be 
completed. 

153. Intermediate Hebrew. Intensive work in Hebrew grammar and 
syntax based upon the readings of selected texts. Readings will em- 
phasize post-Biblical Hebrew. P-lll, 112, or equivalent. 

211. Hebrew Literature. The reading and discussion of significant Bibli- 
cal Hebrew texts. P-153. 

Courses for Graduate Students* 

401, 402. Directed Reading. 

416. Old Testament Theology. 

418, 419. Old Testament Exegesis. 

421. New Testament Theology. 

423, 424. New Testament Exegesis. 

438. Seminar in Historical Types of Christian Ethics. 

448. Seminar in Religious Education. 

451. Theory and Practice of Pastoral Counseling. 

455, 456. Clinical Pastoral Education. 

461. Seminar in Eastern Religion. 

466. Seminar in Christian History. 

475. Seminar in History of Christian Thought. 

480. Theology and the Aesthetic. 

491, 492. Thesis Research. 



For course descriptions, see the Graduate Bulletin. 

175 



French 

ROMANCE LANGUAGE 

A major in French or Spanish requires nine semester courses 
beyond the elementary courses (111, 112). Courses numbered 
221, 222 or 223, 225, 226 are recommended for majors. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to 
apply for admission to the honors program in French or Spanish. 
To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Romance 
Languages," they must meet minimum requirements listed on 
page — , complete French or Spanish 281, and pass a comprehen- 
sive written and oral examination. The oral examination may be 
conducted, at least in part, in the student's major language. For 
additional information members of the staff should be consulted. 

I 
French 

Professors Mary F. Robinson, Bree, Parker, Shoemaker 
Associate Professor Anne Tillett 
Assistant Professor Ljungquist 
Lecturers Hansberger, Rodtwitt 
Instructors Engelsohn, Plassard 

111, 112. Elementary French. A course for beginners, covering the prin- 
ciples of French grammar and emphasizing speaking and writing and 
the reading of elementary texts. Lab — 1 hr. 

153. Intermediate French. A review of grammar and composition with 
practice in conversation. Reading of selected texts. Lab — 2 hrs. P-lll, 
112. 

215. Masterpieces of French Literature. Reading of selected texts in 
French from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Parallel reading and 
reports. (Either 215 or 216, but not both, accepted for credit toward a 
major in French.) P-153 or equivalent. 

216. Masterpieces of French Literature. Reading of selected texts in 
French before the 19th century. Parallel reading and reports. (Either 215 
or 216, but not both, accepted for credit toward a major in French.) 
P-153 or equivalent. 

221. Conversation and Composition. Practice in speaking and writing 
French, stressing correctness of sentence structure, phonetics, pronuncia- 
tion, fluency and vocabulary of everyday situation. Lab — 2 hrs. P-153 
or equivalent. 

176 



French 



222. Composition and Review of Grammar. A systematic review of the 
fundamental principles of comparative grammar, with practical training 
in writing idiomatic French. P-153 or equivalent. 

224. French Civilization. An introduction to French culture and its his- 
torical development. Emphasis on intellectual, artistic, political, social and 
economic life of France. P-221 or permission of instructor. 

225. Survey of French Literature from the Middle Ages through the 
Eighteenth Century. Extensive reading and study of trends and move- 
ments. P-215 or 216. 

226. Survey of French Literature of the Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Centuries. Extensive reading and study of trends and movements. P-215. 

231. Medieval French Literature. A survey of French literature of the 
Middle Ages with cultural and political backgrounds. Selected master- 
pieces in original form and modern transcription. P-215 or 216. 

232. Seminar in Medieval French Literature. Study of selected topics 
of the period. Topics may vary from year to year. P-215 or 216. 

233. Sixteenth Century French Literature. The literature and thought 
of the Renaissance in France, with particular emphasis on the works of 
Rabelais, Montaigne, and the major poets of the age. P-215 or 216. 

234. Seminar in Sixteenth Century French Literature. Study of selected 
topics of the period. Topics may vary from year to year. P-215 or 216. 

241. Seventeenth Century French Literature. A study of the outstanding 
writers of the classical age. P-215 or 216. 

242. Seminar in Seventeenth Century French Literature. Study of 
selected topics of the period. Topics may vary from year to year. P-215 
or 216. 

251. Eighteenth Century French Literature. A survey of French philo- 
sophical and political literature of the eighteenth century. Emphasis on 
Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, and L 'Encyclopedic. P-215 or 
216. 

252. Seminar in Eighteenth Century French Literature. Study of selec- 
ted topics of the period. Topics may vary from year to year. P-215 or 216. 

261. Nineteenth Century French Literature. A study of French litera- 
ture of the nineteenth century with cultural and political backgrounds. 
P-215. 

262. Seminar in Nineteenth Century French Literature. Study of se- 
lected topics of the period. Topics may vary from year to year. P-215. 

263. Trends in French Poetry. A study of the development of the poetic 
genre, with analysis and interpretation of works from each period. P-215 
or 216. 

264. The French Novel. A broad survey of French prose fiction, with 
critical study of several masterpieces in the field. P-215 or 216. 

177 



French 

265. French Drama. A study of the chief trends in French dramatic art, 
with reading and discussion of representative plays. P-215 or 216. 

271. Twentieth Century French Literature. A study of general trends 
and of representative works of the foremost prose writers, dramatists 
and poets. P-215. 

272. Seminar in Twentieth Century French Literature. Study of selected 
topics of the period. Topics may vary from year to year. P-215. 

281. Reading and Research. Extensive reading in French literature. 
Study of bibliography and research techniques. Presentation of a major 
research paper. Restricted admission. Required for departmental honors. 

371. Surrealism: origins, theories, evolution and impact. This course will 
examine the interconnections between surrealist poetry and painting and 
the work of three poets: Breton, Eluard and Aragon. Conducted in 
French. P-221 or equivalent. Miss Germaine Bree 

Wake Forest University Semester in France 

The department of Romance Languages sponsors a Semester 
in France program at Dijon, the site of a well established 
French university. Students go as a group, accompanied by a 
Wake Forest professor. 

Requirements: No particular major is required for eligibility. 
However, a student (1) should be of junior standing and (2) 
should have taken as prerequisite French 221 or its equivalent, 
or at very least one French course beyond the intermediate 
level. 

Instruction and supervision: Students are placed in courses 
according to their level of ability in French, as ascertained by 
a test given at Dijon. Courses are taught by native French 
professors. The resident director supervises residential and 
extracurricular affairs, and has general oversight of independent 
study projects. 

Courses at the Centre International d'Etudes Francaises 

F227. French Grammar and Linguistics. Analysis of grammar and 
composition. Study of phonetics and practice in pronunciation. Use of 
the language laboratory. 

F228. French Civilization. Study of the geography of France along with 
analysis of the political and economic situation in France and observance 
of French social and educational practices. Field trips to points of 
historical and artistic interest. 

178 



Hindi 



F231. History of France. Social and cultural history of France from the 
Middle Ages to the present, (credit in History) 

F275. French Literature. The novel, theater, and poetry of France, 
largely of the period since 1850. 

F290. Philosophy. Study of Descartes and Pascal. Lectures and dis- 
cussion. Term paper on a specific topic, to be evaluated by a professor 
of Philosophy of Wake Forest, (credit in Philosophy) 

Courses at the Universite de Dijon, Faculte des Lettres 
et Sciences Humaines 

F240. Independent study in one of several fields. Scholar's journal and 
research paper. Supervision by the Director of the Semester in France 
and evaluation by the department for which credit is granted. Work may 
be supplemented by lectures on the subject given at the Universite de 
Dijon Faculte des Lettres et Sciences Humaines. 

Students choose four of the above courses. In addition, all 
take the following course. 

WF5. January in France — in September. Residence in a French or 
Swiss locality during September and early October. Observations of cul- 
ture, home life, education, religious practices, etc. Excursions to points of 
historical and artistic interest. Written record of findings and paper on 
some aspect of the culture, to be evaluated by the Director of the Semester 
in France program. 

II 

Chinese* 
Lecturer Speer 

111, 112. Elementary Chinese. Emphasis on the development of listening 
and speaking skills in Mandarin. Brief introduction to the writing sys- 
tem. Basic sentence patterns are covered. Lab — 1 hr. 

Ill 

Hindi* 
Instructor Gokhale 

111, 112. Elementary Hindi. Attention will be given mainly to basic 
Hindi grammar, vocabulary building, simple composition and conversa- 
tion. Lab — 1 hr. 

153. Intermediate Hindi. Advanced practice in Hindi composition, con- 
versation and introduction to literary Hindi. Lab — 1 hr. P-lll, 112 or 
equivalent. 

211. Hindi Literature. Reading and translation of selected texts in 

prose and poetry and journalistic Hindi. Lab — 1 hr. P-153. 

* These courses axe attached to the Department of Romance Languages for administra- 
tive purposes only. 

179 



Spanish 

IV 

Norwegian* 

Lecturer Rodtwitt 

190, 191. The Norwegian Language. Independent study of the language 
and directed reading of texts in Norwegian. Primarily for students 
specializing in foreign languages. 

V 
Russian* 

Associate Professor Anne Tillett 
Visiting Lecturer Jasenovic 

111, 112. Elementary Russian. The essentials of Russian grammar, con- 
versational drill, and reading of elementary texts. Admission with the 
consent of the instructor. 

153. Intermediate Russian. Training in principles of translation with 
grammar review and conversation practice. P-112 or equivalent. 

215. Introduction to Russian Literature. Reading of edited texts from 
the nineteenth century. P-153 or equivalent. 

216. Introduction to Russian Literature. Reading of edited texts from 
the twentieth century. P-153 or equivalent. 

217. Seminar in Nineteenth Century Russian Literature. A study of the 
foremost writers with reading of representative works. P-153 or equiva- 
lent. 

218. Seminar in Contemporary Russian Literature. Reading of represen- 
tative works in Russian with discussion of political and cultural back- 
grounds. P-153 or equivalent. 

VI 

Spanish 

Professors King, Campbell 
Associate Professor Bryant 
Instructors Engelsohn, Johnson, J. L. Robinson, 
Whitchurch 

111, 112. Elementary Spanish. A course for beginners, covering grammar 
essentials, and emphasizing speaking, writing, and the reading of elemen- 
tary texts. Lab — 1 hr. 

153. Intermediate Spanish. A review of grammar and composition with 
practice in conversation. Reading of selected texts. Lab — 2 hrs. P-lll, 
112. 

215. Major Spanish Writers. Reading of selected texts from the nine- 
teenth and twentieth centuries. Parallel reading and reports. (Either 215 
or 216, but not both, accepted for credit toward a major in Spanish.) 
P-153 or equivalent. 

_ * These courses are attached to the Department of Romance Languages for administra- 
tive purposes only. 

180 



Spanish 

216. Major Spanish American Writers. Reading of selected texts. Par- 
allel reading and reports. (Either 215 or 216, but not both, accepted for 
credit toward a major in Spanish.) P-153 or equivalent. 

221. Conversation and Composition. Practice in speaking and writing 
Spanish, stressing correctness of sentence structure, phonetics, pro- 
nunciation, fluency and vocabulary of everyday situations. Lab — 1 hr. 
P-153. 

223. Advanced Grammar and Composition. A systematic review of 
the fundamental principles of comparative grammar, with practical 
training in writing idiomatic Spanish. Lab — 1 hr. P-153 or equivalent. 

224. Hispanic Civilization. An introduction to Hispanic culture and its 
historical development. Emphasis on intellectual, artistic, political, social, 
and economic life of Spain and Spanish America. P-221 or permission 
of instructor. 

225. Survey of Spanish Literature from the Middle Ages through the 
Seventeenth Century. Extensive reading and study of trends and in- 
fluences. P-215. 

226. Survey of Spanish Literature from the Eighteenth Century to the 
Present. Extensive reading and study of trends and movements. P-215. 

227. Survey of Spanish American Literature. Extensive reading and 
study of works from the Colonial through the contemporary periods, 
with emphasis on the late-nineteenth and twentieth centuries. P-215. 

228. Seminar in Spanish American Literature. Study of selected writ- 
ings. Authors chosen may vary from year to year. P-215. 

234. Spanish Prose Fiction Before Cervantes. A study of the several 
types of prose fiction, such as the sentimental, chivalric, pastoral, Moorish, 
and picaresque novels prior to 1605. P-215. 

235. Seminar in Spanish Prose Fiction Before Cervantes. A study of the 
development of several types of Spanish prose fiction before the Quixote. 
P-215. 

241. Golden Age Drama. A study of the major dramatic works of Lope 
dp Vega, Calderon de la Barca, Tirso de Molina, Ruiz de Alarcon, and 
others. P-215. 

242. Seminar in Golden Age Drama. A study of selected dramatic works 
of the period. Selections may change from year to year. P-215. 

243. Cervantes. Intensive study of the life and works of Cervantes, with 
special emphasis on the Quixote and the exemplary novels. P-215. 

244. Seminar in Cervantes. A study of special aspects of Cervantes' 
works. Emphasis may vary from year to year. P-215. 

251. Spanish Lyric Poetry. A study of the development of the poetic 
genre, with analysis and interpretation of works from each period. P-215. 

261. Nineteenth Century Spanish Novel. A study of the novels of 
Valera, Pereda, Galdos, Pardo Bazan, Blasco Ibanez and their contem- 
poraries. P-215. 

181 



Spanish 

265. Spanish American Novel. A study of the novel in Spanish America 
from its beginning through the contemporary period. P-215. 

266. Seminar in Spanish American Novel. A study of one or more 
categories of Spanish American novels. Materials may change from year 
to year. P-215. 

272. Modern Spanish Drama. A study of the principal dramatic works 
from the Romantic movement through the contemporary period. P-215. 

273. Modern Spanish Novel. A study of representative Spanish novels 
from the "Generation of '98" through the contemporary period. P-215. 

274. Seminar in Modern Spanish Novel. A study of one or more cate- 
gories of Spanish novels. Materials may change from year to year. P-215. 

281. Reading and Research. Extensive reading in Spanish literature. 
Study of bibliography and research techniques. Presentation of a major 
research paper. Restricted admission. Required for departmental honors. 

Wake Forest University Semester in Spain 

The department of Romance Languages is affiliated with the 
Associated Mid-Florida Colleges in the operation of a study 
abroad program conducted at the University of Madrid. Courses 
are taught by native Spanish professors attached to the Uni- 
versity's Facultad de Filosofia y Letras, the Spanish equivalent 
of the college of arts and sciences. Students live with Spanish 
families selected by the program's resident director, a professor 
of Spanish from Wake Forest University or from one of the 
other five colleges and universities in the association. The 
resident director also coordinates and supervises the student's 
academic program and has general oversight of his extracur- 
ricular activities. 

Requirements: Students must have acquired junior standing, 
have completed two years of college Spanish or the equivalent, 
and be approved by both the major department and the depart- 
ment of Romance Languages. No particular major is required 
for eligibility. 

Course Offerings: Approximately thirty courses are available 
in the fields of Spanish language and literature, art, history, 
philosophy, economics, political science, and sociology. Course 
organization and teaching methods in most cases are similar to 
those in American universities, but all classes are conducted in 
Spanish. 

182 



Sociology and Anthropology 



SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 

Professors Banks, Patrick 

Associate Professors Earle (Chairman), Evans*, 

Gulley, Tefft 
Assistant Professors Maultsby, Perricone, Woodall 
Instructors McWilliams, Morenon 

A major in Sociology requires nine semester courses and must 
include Sociology 151, 371, and 380, and five other semester 
courses or seminars, chosen at the discretion of the student and 
his adviser. One of the latter must be a research course (e.g., 
Sociology 384) unless this requirement is satisfied otherwise, 
such as in the winter term. 

A major in Anthropology requires nine semester courses and 
must include Anthropology 162, Sociology 380, five other se- 
mester courses and a seminar, chosen at the discretiion of the 
student and his adviser. One of the latter must be a research 
course unless this requirement is satisfied otherwise, such as in 
the winter term. 

Only one course credit from Anthropology 381-382 and one 
course credit from Anthropology 383-384 may be used to meet 
major requirements. Additional courses would be counted within 
the limits specified for a single field of study. 

Students who choose Sociology and /or Anthropology to meet 
course requirements may select one of the following combina- 
tions: Sociology 151 and any other Sociology course, but not, 
except under unusual circumstances, Sociology 371 or 380; or 
Anthropology 162 and any other Anthropology course except 
Anthropology 260; or Sociology 151 and Anthropology 162, or 
vice versa. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to 
apply for admission to the honors program in Sociology and 
Anthropology. To be graduated with the designation "Honors 
in Sociology" or. "Honors in Anthropology," they must meet 
minimum requirements listed on page 8, they must complete 
a senior research project, write up this research, and satisfac- 
torily defend this work in a comprehensive oral examination. 
For additional information members of the staff should be con- 
sulted. 

* Absent on leave, Fall 1973. 

183 



Sociology 



Sociology 



151. Principles of Sociology. General introduction to the field: social 
organization and disorganization, socialization, culture, social change and 
other aspects. 

152. Social Problems. Survey of contemporary American social problems. 
Credit is not allowed for 344 if this course is taken. P-151. 

248. Marriage and the Family. The social basis of the family, emphasiz- 
ing the problems growing out of modern conditions and social change. 

333. The Community. A survey of materials relating to the community 
as a unit of sociological investigation with emphasis on the urban setting. 
Of particular value for social work or community planning. P-151. 

335. Medical Sociology. Analysis of the social variables associated with 
health and illness and with the practice of medicine. P-151. 

337. Social Gerontology. Basic social problems and processes of aging. 
Social and psychological issues will be discussed. P-151. 

339. Public Opinion and Propaganda. The study of public opinion and 
propaganda and a consideration of mass communication. P-151. 

340. Sociology of Child Development. Socialization through adolescence 
in the light of contemporary behavioral science, emphasizing the signifi- 
cance of social structure. P-151. 

341. Criminology. Crime: its nature, causes, consequences and methods 
of treatment and prevention. P-151. 

344. Social Deviation and Disorganization. A theoretical approach to 
social problems. Emphasis is on the relationship between social structure 
and social problems. Credit is not allowed for 152 if this course is taken. 
P-151. 

358. Population and Society. Techniques used in the study of population 
data. Reciprocal relationship of social and demographic variables. P-151. 

359. Race and Culture. Racial and ethnic group prejudice and dis- 
crimination and its effect on social relationships. Emphasis on psycho- 
logical and sociological theories of prejudice. P-151. 

360. Social Stratification. Methods for locating and studying social 
classes in the U. S. Class structure, function, mobility, and inter-class 
relationships. P-151. 

371. Seminar on Sociological Theory. A review of the major writings 
in the field. Emphasis is placed on the content and on the development 
of theory through time. P-151. 

380. Social Statistics. Basic statistics, emphasizing application in survey 
research. One who takes this course may not receive credit in Bus. Adm. 
268, or Math. 157. 

384. Social Research. A survey of sociological research techniques. Em- 
phasis on developing actual studies. P-151. 

184 



Anthropology 



385, 386. Special Problems Seminar. Intensive investigation of current 
scientific research within the discipline which concentrates on problems 
of contemporary interest. Permission of instructor. 

Anthropology 

162. General Anthropology. Basic concepts of anthropology, focusing 
upon the biological and socio-cultural evolution of man from Pleistocene 
to present and an analysis of his contemporary cultural diversity. 

252. Cultural Anthropology. A cross-cultural analysis of human institu- 
tions concentrating on non- industrial societies. P-162. 

260. Archeological Laboratory Practicum (V2 P er sem.) Instruction in 
artifact cleaning, preserving, cataloging, and analysis; preparation of 
museum exhibits; familiarization with darkroom procedures, drafting and 
report preparation. Permission of instructor. 

342. Peoples and Cultures of Latin America. Ethnographic focus on the 
elements and processes of contemporary Latin American cultures. P-162 
or permission of instructor. 

343. Anthropology and Developing Nations. Analytic survey of problems 
facing emerging nations and the application of anthropology in culture- 
change programs. P-162 or permission of instructor. 

344. Medical Anthropology. The impact of Western medical practices 
and theory on non-Western cultures and anthropological contribution to 
the solving of world health problems. P-162. 

351. Bioanthropology . Introduction to biological (physical) anthropol- 
ogy: human biology, evolution and variability. P-162. 

353. Peoples and Cultures of Africa. The ethnology and prehistory of 
Negro Africa south of the Sahara. P-162. 

354. Primitive Religion. The world-view and values of nonliterate cul- 
tures as expressed in myths, rituals and symbols. P-162 or Soc. 151. 

355. Language and Culture. An introduction to the relations between 
language and culture including methods for field research. P-162. 

356. Old World Pre-History. Introduction to prehistoric archaeology: 
field and laboratory techniques, with survey of world prehistory. P-162. 

357. Personality in Culture. A seminar designed to study the psycho- 
dynamics of social personality and national character. P-162 or Soc. 151. 

358. The American Indian. Ethnology and prehistory of the American 
Indian. P-162. 

359. Prehistory of North America. The development of culture in North 
America as outlined by archaeological research, with an emphasis on 
paleoecology and socio-cultural processes. P-162. 

360. Archaeology of the Southeastern United States. A study of human 
adaptation in the Southeast from the Pleistocene to the present, emphasiz- 
ing the role of ecological factors in determining the formal aspects of 
culture. P-162. 

185 



Anthropology 



362. Seminar: Human Ecology and Geography. The relations between 
man and his inorganic and organic environment as mediated by culture. 
P-162 or permission of instructor. 

363. American Indian Origins. Possible origins and subsequent dispersion 
of American Indians. Pertinent information from a variety of disciplines 
will be considered but physical anthropology will be stressed. Permission 
of Instructor. 

373. Peoples and Cultures of Southeast Asia. Ethnology and prehistory 
of Southeast Asia. P-162 or permission of instructor. 

379. Research Methods in Anthropology. Introduction to the principal 
research techniques used in anthropology. P-162. 

381, 382. Archaeological Research. The recovery of anthropological data 
through the use of archaeology, taught in the excavation and interpreta- 
tion of a prehistoric site. P-162. 

383, 384. Field Research in Cultural Anthropology. Training in techni- 
ques for the study of foreign cultures, carried out in the field. P-162. 

385, 386. Special Problems Seminar. Intensive investigation of current 
scientific research within the discipline which concentrates on problems 
of contemporary interest. Permission of instructor. 

Courses for Graduate Students* 

Sociology 

412. Development of Sociological Theory. 

421. Quantification in Social Research. 

426. Seminar: Sociological Research Methods. 

431. Seminar: An Analysis of Contemporary Society. 

435. Seminar on Social Change. 

441. Directed Readings and Research. 

491, 492. Thesis Research. 

Anthropology 

452. Anthropological Theory. 

455. Seminar: Readings in Physical Anthropology and 
Archeology. 

456. Seminar: Readings in Cultural Anthropology. 

462. Seminar: Research Methods in Social Anthropology. 

* For course descriptions, see the Graduate Bulletin. 

186 



Speech 

464. Seminar: Research in Applied Anthropology. 

472. Seminar: Research Methods in Archaeology. 

485. Directed Reading and Research. 

491, 492. Thesis Research. 

SPEECH COMMUNICATION AND THEATRE ARTS 

Professors Shirley, Burroughs, Welker 
Associate Professors Hayes, Tedford 
Assistant Professor Wolfe 
Instructors Causby, Fullerton, May, Williams 

The major in Speech Communication and Theatre Arts con- 
sists of nine semester courses. 

Those students majoring in Speech Education are expected 
to take specific courses which meet the requirements for Teacher 
Certification. Information concerning these courses may be 
obtained from departmental advisers. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to 
apply for admission to the honors program in Speech Com- 
munication and Theatre Arts. To be graduated with the desig- 
nation "Honors in Speech Communication and Theatre Arts," 
they must meet minimum requirements listed on page 8, as 
well as successfully complete Course 281. For additional infor- 
mation members of the staff should be consulted. 

The following three courses apply to each of the three areas 
within the department: 

281. Honors in Speech Communication and Theatre Arts. A conference 
course involving intensive work in the area of special interest for selected 
seniors who wish to graduate with departmental honors. 

282. Independent Study. Special research and readings in a choice of 
interest to be approved by a faculty adviser. 

283. 284. Debate, Radio-TV-Film, or Theatre Arts Practicum. (V 2 per 
sem.) Individualized projects in the student's choice of debate, radio-TV- 
film, or theatre arts; includes organizational meetings, faculty supervision, 
and faculty evaluation. No student may register for more than V2 Unit of 
Practicum in any semester. Further, no student will be allowed to take 
more than a total of two units credits in practicum, only one unit of 
which may be counted toward a major in Speech Communications and 
Theatre Arts. Pass-Fail Only. 

187 



Speech 

Communication-Public Address 

151. Speech Fundamentals. A study of the nature and fundamentals 
of speech communication. Practice in the preparation and delivery of 
short speeches. 

152. Public Speaking. The preparation and presentation of short 
speeches to inform, convince, actuate, and entertain. P-151. 

153. Interpersonal Communication. The course is divided into three 
parts: communication theory, person-to-person communication, and small 
group interaction. 

161. Voice and Diction. A study of the principles of voice and produc- 
tion with emphasis on phonetics as a basis for correct sound formation. 

162. Voice Production and Articulation. This course will explore normal 
and abnormal articulation and voice. Includes testing procedures to 
determine the problem as well as theory techniques for problem cor- 
rection. 

231. Oral Interpretation of Literature. Fundamentals of reading aloud 
with emphasis on selection, analysis, and performance. 

251. Persuasion. A study of the principles and forms of persuasive 
speaking. Practice in persuasive speaking. P-151, or permission of in- 
structor. 

252. Argumentation and Debate. A study of the essentials of argumen- 
tation. Practice in debate. Open to freshmen and sophomores by permis- 
sion of instructor. 

253. Rhetorical Theory. Survey of rhetorical theory emphasizing Plato, 
Aristotle, Cicero, Quintilian, Blair, Campbell, Whately, and Burke. 

261. Principles of Speech Pathology. A foundation course in principles 
and procedures of speech correction for those handicapped by disorders of 
language, voice, rhythm, and articulation with emphasis on functional 
disorders. 

262. Clinical Methods in Speech Pathology. A study of methods and 
principles used to correct disorders of voice, language, rhythm, and articu- 
lation with emphasis on organic disorders. P-261. 

263. Audiology. Survey of the field of hearing and hearing disorders. 

281. Honors in Speech Communication and Theatre Arts. (See previous 
description.) 

282. Independent Study. (See previous description.) 

283. 284. Debate Practicum. (See previous description.) 

351. Introduction to Semantics. A study of how persons respond to words 
and other symbols. Reports and a critical paper. 

352. Group Discussion and Conference Leadership. An introduction to 
the theory and practice of cooperative group deliberation. Collateral 
readings. 

188 



Theatre Arts 



353. British Public Address. A historical and critical survey of leading 
British speakers and their speeches from the sixteenth century to the 
present. 

354. American Public Address. The history and criticism of American 
public address from colonial times to the present. 

S-355. Directing the Forensic Program. A pragmatic study of the meth- 
ods of directing high school and college forensics with work in the Wake 
Forest High School Speech Institute. (Summer only.) 

Radio-Television-Film 

241. Introduction to Broadcasting. A Study of the historical, legal, 
economic, and social aspects of broadcasting. 

245. Introduction to Film. Historical introduction to motion pictures 
through the study of various kinds of films and their relationship to 
society. 

281. Honors in Speech Communication and Theatre Arts. (See previous 
description.) 

282. Independent Study. (See previous description.) 

283. 284. Radio-TV -Film Practicum. (See previous description.) 

341. Radio-TV-Film Production. Advanced radio-television-film produc- 
tion workshop. P-283, 284. 

342. Seminar in Radio-TV. Extensive readings in and discussions of 
fundamental theory and current issues in radio and TV. P-241. 

346. Film Criticism. A study of film aesthetics through an analysis of 
the work of selected film-makers and film critics. P-245. 

Theatre Arts 

121. Introduction to the Theatre. A survey of all areas of Theatre Art. 
Experience in laboratory and University Theatre productions. Lab — 
3 hrs. 

223. Stagecraft. A study of the basic elements of theatre technology. 
Practical experience gained in laboratory and University Theatre pro- 
ductions. Open to freshmen and sophomores by permission of instructor. 
Lab — 5 hrs. 

226. Theories of Acting. A study of acting theories and fundamental 
acting techniques. Open to freshmen and sophomores by permission of 
instructor. Lab — 2 hrs. 

227. Theatre Speech. An intensive course in the analysis and correlation 
of the physiological, physical, and interpretative aspects of voice and 
diction on the stage. 

281. Honors in Speech Communication and Theatre Arts. (See previous 
description.) 

189 



Theatre Arts 



282. Independent Study. (See previous description.) 

283, 284. Theatre Arts Practicum. (See previous description.) 

320. Theatrical Scene Design. A study of theories and styles of stage de- 
sign and their application to the complete play. P-121 and 223, or per- 
mission of instructor. 

322. Play Directing. An introduction to the theory and practice of play 
directing. Lab — 2 hrs. P-121 and 226, or permission of instructor. 

S-324. Directing the Drama Program. A study of the function of drama 
in the educational curriculum with emphasis on the secondary level. 
Laboratory work in the High School Speech Institute. Lab — 6 hrs. 

325. 'Advanced Acting. A concentrated study of the actor's art through 
theory and practice. P-226 or permission of instructor. 

327. Theatre History I. A survey of the development of the theatre 
from its origins to 1870, includes lectures, readings and reports. 

328. Theatre History II. A survey of the development of the modern 
theatre from 1870 to the present day, includes lectures, readings and 
reports. 

Courses for Graduate Students* 

421. Modern Theatre Production. 

423. Advanced Directing. 

426. Evolution of Dramatic Theory: Seminar. 

428. The Play. 

451. Classical Rhetoric. 

452. Renaissance and Modern Rhetoric. 

453. Seminar in Argumentation and Persuasion. 

454. Seminar in Public Address. 
463. Bases of Speech. 

481, 482. Readings and Research in Speech Communication 

and Theatre. 
491, 492. Thesis Research. 



*For course descriptions, see the graduate Bulletin. 

190 




Groves Stadium 



191 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 

On January 13, 1961, the Trustees of Wake Forest College 
established the Division of Graduate Studies and announced 
that beginning in September, 1961, the College would resume 
course and research work leading to the degree Master of Arts 
in the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, English, History, 
Mathematics, and Physics. In September, 1964, the Department 
of Psychology was added to this group. Two years later, grad- 
uate study was begun in the Department of Sociology and 
Anthropology, and in September, 1967, the Departments of 
Physical Education and Religion inaugurated master's degree 
programs. In September, 1969, the Department of Speech in- 
troduced work leading to the M.A. degree. A year later the 
Department of Biology began work leading to the Ph.D. degree. 
A doctoral program in the Department of Chemistry was begun 
in 1972. 

On June 12, 1967, when Wake Forest College became Wake 
Forest University, the name of the Division of Graduate Studies 
was changed to the Graduate School. Also on that date, the 
Department of Education began offering programs of study 
leading to the Master of Arts in Education degree. 

Candidates for the degree Master of Arts are required to com- 
plete successfully a minimum of twenty-four hours of course 
work, write a thesis for which six hours of credit are allotted, 
and pass a reading examination in one modern foreign language, 
or, in some disciplines, substitute a demonstration of compe- 
tency in a special skill such as computer programming or statis- 
tics. The requirements for the Master of Arts in Education 
degree are essentially the same except that prospective counsel- 
ors may write an internship report instead of a thesis. 

The Graduate School will have twenty full tuition scholar- 
ships available to be awarded for the summer of 1974 and a 
total of one hundred ten assistantships, fellowships, and schol- 
arships for the academic year 1974-1975. 

The Bulletin of the Graduate School, an application for 
admission form, and an application for grant form may be 
obtained by writing the Dean of the Graduate School, Box 7485, 
Reynolda Station, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, 
North Carolina 27109. 

192 



THE BABCOCK GRADUATE SCHOOL OF 
MANAGEMENT 

Administration and Faculty* 

James Ralph Scales, President 

Frank J. Schilagi, Dean and Associate Professor of Man- 
agement 
J. Timothy Heames, Associate Dean and Lecturer in Man- 
agement 
Robert W. Shively, Associate Dean and Associate Pro- 
fessor of Management 
Jack D. Ferner, Director of Career Education and Lecturer 

in Management 
Judson D. DeRamus, Director of the Management Institute 
John M. Zerba, Director of Admissions and Student Affairs 
Jean B. Hopson, Librarian 

George W. Brooker, Jr., Assistant Professor of Manage- 
ment 
Robert S. Carlson, Professor of Management 
Kanak K. Chopra, Assistant Professor of Management 
W. Franklin Edwards, Associate Professor of Management 
Theodore D. Klastorin, Assistant Professor of Manage- 
ment 
Marvin D. Loper, Assistant Professor of Management 
Jeanne Owen, Professor of Business Law 
Peter R. Peacock, Instructor in Management 
Phillip Stanley Shinoda, Instructor in Management 
Dan R. E. Thomas, Assistant Professor of Management 
Robert N. White, Associate Director of Executive Pro- 
grams and Lecturer in Management 

General Statement 
Individuals wishing to prepare themselves for careers in man- 
agement through studies at the graduate level should direct their 
attention to the programs offered in the Babcock Graduate 
School of Management. The Babcock School offers programs 

* See Administration and Faculty sections for full information. 

193 



School of Management 



leading to the Master of Business Administration or the Master 
of Management degrees. Programs are designed to prepare stu- 
dents for careers in both the private and public sectors of our 
economy. 

The Babcock School is prepared not only to train students 
interested in graduate study, but has a systematic program of 
career education for operating managers and administrators. The 
cornerstone of the career education program is the MBA-Exec- 
utive Program. The MBA-Executive Program is designed for 
executives who wish to continue to update their managerial 
skills. 

Through the generosity of the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation 
and Mrs. Nancy Susan Reynolds, the Babcock School occupies 
a completely modem building honoring the memory of Charles 
H. Babcock. 

Admission Test 

The Babcock Graduate School of Management requires all 
applicants for admission to take the Admission Test for Grad- 
uate Study in Business (ATGSB), a test administered by Edu- 
cational Testing Service. This score is only one of a number of 
factors used in consideration of prospective students for ad- 
mission. 

Applicants should write ATGSB, Educational Testing Service, 
Box 966, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 for an application form. 

Scholarship and Student Aid 

The Babcock Graduate School of Management has substantial 
resources for financial aid for its students. These fellowships 
and assistantships are awarded on the basis of both need and 
potential for outstanding performance. Awards are made only 
after admission to the school. 

Graduate Curriculum 

The objectives of the graduate curriculum are: a) mastery of 
a common body of knowledge contained in courses which com- 
prise the "core" curriculum, b) acquisition of process skills to 

194 



School of Management 



apply accumulated knowledge to managerial problems, and c) 
development of the ability to manage in a changing environment. 

The core curriculum is divided into five centers of learning 
and proficiency must be demonstrated in the courses contained 
therein: 

Behavioral Science 

401 — Introduction to Behavioral Science 
402- — Organization Theory and Behavior 
403— Personal Goals 

Environmental Analysis 

4 1 1 — Microeconomics 

413 — External Environment 

4 1 2 — Macroeconomics 

Organization Functions 

421 — Management Functions I 

431 — Managerial Accounting 

441 — Financial Management 

451 — Marketing 

463 — Marketing Operations Management 

Quantitative Methods 

433 — Programming Methods 
461 — Quantitative Methods 
462 — Management Science 
471 — Probability and Statistics 
472 — Applied Statistics 

Systems Science 

422 — Management Functions I 

432 — Nature and Analysis of Systems 



195 



SCHOOL OF LAW 

Faculty* 

James Ralph Scales, President 

Pasco M. Bowman II, Dean and Professor of Law 

Richard Gordon Bell, Professor of Law 

Rhoda Bryan Billings, Assistant Professor of Law 

Leon Henry Corbett, Jr., Assistant Dean and Associate 

Professor of Law 
Hugh William Divine, Professor of Law 
Esron McGruder Faris, Jr., Professor of Law 
Henry Conrad Lauerman, Professor of Law 
Robert E. Lee, Professor of Law 
Sylvester Petro, Professor of Law 
Charles P. Rose, Jr., Assistant Professor of Law 
David F. Shores, Associate Professor of Law 
James E. Sizemore, Professor of Law 
George K. Walker, Associate Professor of Law 
James A. Webster, Jr., Professor of Law 

Adjunct Faculty 

Murray C. Greason, Jr., Lecturer in Law 
G. Dudley Humphrey, Lecturer in Law 
Mrs. Vivian Lunsford Wilson, Law Librarian 

General Statement 

The School of Law was established as a department of Wake 
Forest College in 1894, the first instructor being Professor N. Y. 
Gulley, who served as dean from 1905 until his retirement from 
active administration in 1935. The School of Law is fully ap- 
proved by all national and state accrediting agencies. It is a 
member of the Association of American Law Schools, and is 
listed as an approved school by the American Bar Association, 
by the Board of Law Examiners and Council of the North Caro- 
lina State Bar, and by the University of the State of New York. 

The selection and treatment of the courses of study offered 
in the School of Law, and the method of instruction employed 
are designed to afford comprehensive and thorough training in 

* See Administration and Faculty sections for full information. 

196 



Law 

the broad field of legal education and to equip students to prac- 
tice in any jurisdiction where the Anglo-American law system 
prevails. The achievement of these purposes necessitates, first, 
the requirement of adequate and appropriate preliminary educa- 
tion in order to assure an intellectual maturity and cultural 
background against which legal principles and problems can be 
understood in their social, economic and moral, as well as in 
their legal aspects; second, a comprehensive study of the 
theories and doctrines of the Anglo-American system of law 
and their statutory modification. 

The School of Law has as its objective, not only to train a stu- 
dent in legal principles and doctrines, but also to stimulate his 
reasoning powers, to prepare him to present legal propositions 
logically and analytically, and to develop in the student a pro- 
found sense of legal ethics, professional responsibility and the 
duty of the lawyer to society. 

The School of Law has its separate building, modern in all 
respects and designed to accommodate the continued growth 
and future development of the School and the expansion of its 
program in the field of legal education. The law building, which 
is a handsome four-story structure, contains many attractive 
and useful features including air-conditioning. 

The Law Library contains approximately 51,000 volumes, 
carefully selected to avoid unnecessary duplication and to insure 
the greatest possible usefulness. 

Admission Requirements 

The academic requirements for admission to the School 
of Law, as a candidate for the J.D. degree, may be satisfied 
by any one of the following methods: 

(1) An academic degree from an approved college or univer- 
sity. 

(2) The completion of three years of academic work pre- 
scribed in the "Combined Course" in Wake Forest College. (See 
pages 106-107 for details.) 

The School of Law does not admit applicants without an 
academic degree, except applicants from Wake Forest College 
who pursue the "Combined Course" plan of three years of 
acceptable academic work in Wake Forest College. 

197 



Law 

The academic requirements set forth above are minimum 
requirements, and satisfaction of these requirements does not 
necessarily entitle an applicant to admission. The School of Law 
considers not only the scholastic average, but also the nature 
and subject-matter of the courses taken by the applicant. In 
addition, an applicant for admission is required to take the Law 
School Admission Test. 

There is no rigidly prescribed pre-legal curriculum for admis- 
sion to the School of Law. Since the law, in its application and 
as a subject of study, touches so many phases of life, it has been 
considered unwise to require an inflexible preparatory course. 
The School of Law does recommend the inclusion of as many 
of the following courses as possible in any pre-law program 
of study: English Composition, History of the United States, 
History of England, European History, Constitutional History, 
Government of the United States, State and Local Government, 
Comparative Government, International Relations, Literature, 
Foreign Languages, Speech, Psychology, Philosophy, Logic, 
Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Principles of Economics, Ac- 
counting, and Investments. 

Application for admission to the School of Law must be made 
in writing on a form furnished by the School of Law. Partici- 
pation in the Law School Data Assembly Service is required. 

Beginning students are admitted to the School of Law at 
the opening of the fall session. In addition, for several years it 
has been the policy of the School of Law to admit beginning stu- 
dents at the opening of the spring session, which enables such 
students by continuing without interruption to complete the 
three-year course in two and one-half years consisting of five 
regular semesters and two summer sessions. 

Admission to Advanced Standing. A student from a law 
school which is a member of the Association of American Law 
Schools, who is otherwise qualified, may in the discretion of 
the faculty be admitted to advanced standing for the J.D. de- 
gree. The student must be eligible for readmission to the law 
school from which he proposes to transfer. The last year of work 
on the basis of which the degree is granted must be taken in 
the Wake Forest University School of Law. 

198 



Law 



Admission Test 

The School of Law requires all applicants for admission to 
take the Law School Admission Test, a test administered by 
Educational Testing Service. The applicant's score on the Test 
will be considered among other factors in passing on his appli- 
cation for admission to this Law School. 

Applicants should write Law School Admission Test, Educa- 
tional Testing Service, P.O. Box 944, Princeton, New Jersey, 
08540, for application forms for taking the Test, for the Bulletin 
of Information regarding the Test, and for the Law School Data 
Assembly Service forms. 

Scholarships and Student Aid 

The School of Law has a number of scholarships available for 
each beginning class. Some of these scholarships are awarded on 
the basis of character, scholarship and financial need. Additional 
scholarships in a larger amount and covering full tuition are 
available for each beginning class and are awarded on the basis 
of character and exceptional scholastic achievement without 
regard to financial need. The School participates in the Grad- 
uate and Professional School Financial Aid Service for the pro- 
cessing of applications for scholarships. Forms for that Service 
are also available from Educational Testing Service. 

The University has available loan funds for the benefit of 
students who are in need of financial aid and have satisfactorily 
completed at least a full semester. 

In addition, a number of law students are afforded limited 
employment as Law Library assistants and dormitory counselors 
but usually after the completion of their first year. 

Degree of J.D. 

The degree of Juris Doctor (J.D.) will be awarded to the 
student who (1) has fulfilled the requirements for admission 
to the School of Law as a regular student, (2) thereafter spends 
the equivalent of three academic years in resident study in the 
School of Law, (3) successfully completes eighty-four semester 
hours of law, including all prescribed courses, and (4) attains 

199 



Law 



a cumulative weighted average of 67 or more on all work 
required for graduation. 

The Summer Session 

The School of Law operates a summer session of nine weeks, 
the work of which is carefully planned with reference to the 
curriculum of the regular academic year, and which may be used 
either to supplement the regular curriculum or as a substitute 
for part of it. Courses are offered during the summer session 
for advanced students only. 

Further Information 

Descriptions of the system of grading and examinations, 
general scholastic regulations, student organizations, prizes 
and awards, and the complete course of study are contained 
in a special Law School Bulletin, issued annually. Requests for 
this Bulletin, and other correspondence concerning the School 
of Law, should be addressed to The Dean, School of Law, 
Wake Forest University, P. 0. Box 7206 Reynolda Station, 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 27109. 




200 



THE 1974 SUMMER SESSION 

Eight- Week Term — June 10- August 3 
Two Four- Week Terms — June 10-July 6, July 8-August 3 

The Summer Session of 1974 will provide a variety of terms to 
accommodate the needs and purposes of students who attend in 
summer. Students may enroll for one course in each four-week 
term, or for one or two courses in the eight-week term. Graduate 
students, and superior undergraduates, may enroll for a total 
of three courses by taking one course in each of the four-week 
terms and concurrently one course in the eight-week term. 

All courses in the four-week terms will meet during the morn- 
ing hours, for two fifty-minute periods. Courses in the eight- 
week term will meet in the late morning or early afternoon for 
a single fifty-minute period. Science courses, including labora- 
tories will meet from 8 : 00 a.m. to 1 : 00 p.m. All classes will meet 
daily, Monday through Friday. 

The courses offered are designed to meet the needs of regular 
Wake Forest students, incoming freshmen, visiting students 
from other colleges, and public school teachers seeking renewal 
of certificates. There will be courses in Anthropology, Biology, 
Business and Accountancy, Chemistry, Economics, Education, 
English, French, History, Mathematics, Philosophy, Politics, 
Psychology, Physics, Religion, Sociology, Spanish, and Speech. 
The Department of Education will offer a course in Directed 
Teaching for college graduates interested in qualifying for a 
class A teaching certificate. 

Graduate courses leading to the Master of Arts degree will be 
offered in the departments of English, History, Psychology, 
Sociology and Anthropology, and Speech. Opportunities for re- 
search toward the Master of Arts degree, but not graduate 
courses, will be provided in the departments of Biology, Chem- 
istry, Mathematics, and Physics. 

A special program, the Master of Arts in Education, will be 
offered for teachers who desire to complete a Master's program 
in summer sessions. 

201 



Summer Session 



A Summer Session Bulletin containing full information will 
be published in February and may be obtained by writing the 
Dean of the Summer Session, Wake Forest University, Box 
7293 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109. 




Mrs. Clifford Daniel (nee Margaret Truman) and President 
Scales lift the first spade of dirt for the Fine Arts Building, June 
1973. 



202 



BOWMAN GRAY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Administration Officers* 

James Ralph Scales, President 

Manson Meads, Vice President for Medical Affairs 

Richard Janeway, Dean 

Clyde T. Hardy, Jr., Associate Dean (Private Patient 
Services) 

C. Nash Herndon, Associate Dean (Research Develop- 
ment) 

Warren H. Kennedy, Associate Dean (Administration) 
and Director, Division of Resource Management 

C. Douglas Maynard, Associate Dean (Student Affairs) 

Emery C. Miller, Jr., Associate Dean (Continuing Educa- 
tion) 

B. Lionel Truscott, Assistant Dean (Admissions) 

Michael D. Sprinkle, Librarian 

Origin and Development 

The School of Medicine was established at Wake Forest in 
1902. It was renamed the School of Medical Sciences in 1937 
and operated as a two-year medical school until 1941, when it 
was moved to Winston-Salem as a four-year medical school in 
association with the North Carolina Baptist Hospital. It was 
renamed The Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest 
University in recognition of the benefactor who made the expan- 
sion possible. 

Facilities 

The main teaching hospital of the medical school is North 
Carolina Baptist Hospital which recently was expanded to 655 
beds. The hospital serves as a secondary and tertiary referral 
center for the community and an area consisting of several 
southeastern states. 



* See Administration and Faculty sections. For the complete faculty roster, see the 

special bulletin of The Bowman Gray School of Medicine, which may be obtained by 

request to The Office of Admissions, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, 
North Carolina 27103. 

203 



Medicine 

In addition to the general hospital facilities available, Baptist 
Hospital, with its new 16-story patient tower, contains a 38-bed 
intensive care unit, a 14-bed coronary care unit, a 70-bed pro- 
gressive care unit, a six-bed clinical research unit, a new 17- 
room operating suite with an adjoining 17-bed recovery room, 
and a six-bed hemodialysis unit. 

The medical school and hospital buildings join to form a 
single unit, resulting in close correlation of clinical and basic 
science teaching programs. 

A multi-million dollar expansion program, initiated in 1963 
has virtually doubled the size of the medical center. The first 
phase of the construction was accomplished in 1969 with the 
completion of four buildings — the Hanes Building, a major 
addition to the medical school; the Charles H. Babcock Audi- 
torium, a /400-seat facility equipped with modern audiovisual 
systems; a 55,500-square-foot instructional center for allied 
health programs; and a new power plant. 

These facilities have permitted a significant increase in the 
enrollment of students and an expansion of educational and re- 
search programs. They also have enabled the medical school to 
adopt a new curriculum, designed to better prepare today's 
students for the practice of tomorrow's medicine. 

With the completion of the Reynolds Tower, inpatient care at 
the medical center will approximate 200,000 bed days a year. 
Ambulatory patient visits to the medical center total more than 
114,000 per year. And an active emergency room serves over 
30,000 visits. The construction of a new ambulatory care center 
is under way. 

Requirements For Admission 

The majority of applicants complete four years of under- 
graduate work. However, applicants who have demonstrated 
exceptional ability and have completed 90 semester hours will 
be considered. 

In order for the student entering medical school to be pre- 
pared for his courses, he must have acquired certain basic 

204 



Medicine 

scientific information. Such information is ordinarily obtained 
in the following undergraduate courses: 

2 semesters of general biology 

2 semesters of general chemistry 

2 semesters of organic chemistry 

2 semesters of general physics 

It should be emphasized that, in listing the above scientific 
requirements, it is not intended to minimize the importance of 
other less specific educational requirements. 

In addition to the material listed above, the student should 
acquire extensive knowledge of man as the product of his 
social, physical, and emotional environment. The desired train- 
ing is given in courses in Philosophy, Religion, Economics, 
Sociology, History, Literature, Mathematics, Language, and 
Psychology. The student is urged to acquaint himself as widely 
in these fields of knowledge as time and his inclination will 
permit. 

Early Decision Program 

The University has begun an experimental program with a 
few selected undergraduate schools whereby students will be 
selected at the end of their second year of undergraduate work 
and offered a place in School of Medicine upon graduation from 
undergraduate school. The purpose for the secured status would 
be to emphasize factors other than grades as criteria for the 
selection of students to study medicine. A physician, in addition 
to # needing an alert and growing mind, should possess many other 
desirable personal traits such as integrity, discretion, motivation, 
judgment and concern which will enable him to function effec- 
tively. Some medical students may be selected on the basis of 
their strong personal potential for medicine. 

Early acceptance will allow a student to develop fully his 
educational background without undue apprehension concerning 
grades and will not require excessive emphasis to be devoted to 
science. In addition to academic flexibility, students will be 
afforded professional counsel from both the School of Medicine 
and the undergraduate school. 

205 



Medicine 

Students will be selected jointly by the Admissions Commit- 
tee of the School of Medicine and the Pre-Medical Committee 
of the undergraduate school. A student may initiate an applica- 
tion himself or may be invited to apply by the Wake Forest 
University Pre-Medical Committee. 

Admission 

Students are selected on the basis of academic performance, 
character, and general fitness for the study of medicine. No 
student will be admitted who is ineligible, because of scholastic 
difficulties or misconduct, to re-enroll in a school previously 
attended. Students more than twenty-six years of age are not 
encouraged to apply. 

Graduate Studies 

Course work is offered leading to the Doctor of Philosophy de- 
gree with a major in Anatomy, Biochemistry, Microbiology, 
Pharmacology, Physiology and Comparative and Experimental 
Pathology. In addition, course work leading to the M.S. degree 
is offered in Anatomy, Biochemistry, Microbiology, Pharma- 
cology, Physiology, and Comparative and Experimental Pa- 
thology. A program leading to the Master of Science degree is 
offered in the Department of Comparative Medicine for students 
who hold the D.V.M. degree. The Master of Science degree in 
Medical Sciences is offered to qualified students including medi- 
cal students and persons holding the M.D., D.V.M. or D.D.S. 
degrees. This graduate program may be carried out in any de- 
partment or section of the medical school with the approval of 
the Committee on Graduate Studies. 

M.D.-Ph.D. Program 

A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program is available for exceptional 
students interested in both clinical medicine and research train- 
ing in anticipation of a career in academic medicine. Applicants 
must be acceptable to both the School of Medicine and the grad- 
uate school. 



206 



■ i mum^ f 




207 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Terms Expire December 31, 1974 

Richard Avery, Greensboro J. Samuel Holbrook, Statesville 

James T. Broyhill, Lenoir R. W. Kicklighter, Elizabeth City 

John M. Cheek, Jr., Durham James W. Mason, Laurinburg 

Roy B. Culler, Jr., High Point George W. Paschal, Jr., Raleigh 

Leon L. Rice, Jr., Winston-Salem 

Terms Expire December 31, 1975 

James C. Cammack, Fayetteville C. C. Hope, Jr., Charlotte 

Charles W. Cheek, Greensboro Claude A. McNeill, Jr., Elkin 

Philip Godwin, Gatesville J. Robert Philpott, Lexington 

John C. Hamrick, Shelby Colin Stokes, Winston-Salem 

James B. Turner, Jr., Raleigh 

Terms Expire December 31, 1976 

Carl E. Bates, Charlotte Gloria Flippin Graham, Wilson 

E. Lee Cain, High Point Howard N. Lee, Chapel Hill 

Thomas H. Davis, Winston-Salem William D. Poe, Durham 

Floyd Fletcher, Durham Philip M. Tate, Winston-Salem 

Frank B. Wyatt, High Point 

Terms Expire December 31, 1977 

J. Donald Bradsher, Roxboro Egbert L. Davis, Jr., Winston-Salem 

Joseph Branch, Raleigh C. Kitchin Josey, Scotland Neck 

Dewey Herbert Bridger, Jr., Bladenboro James R. Nance, Fayetteville 

John Edwin Collette, Winston-Salem Mrs. Charles Lee Smith, Jr., Raleigh 

The Rev. Mr. R. F. Smith, Jr., Hickory 

Lifetime Honorary Members 
Lex Marsh, Charlotte Basil M. Watkins, Durham 

Officers 

For one-year term beginning January 1, 1974 

George W. Paschal, Jr., Raleigh, Chairman 

JAMES W. MASON, Laurinburg, Vice Chairman 

Mrs. Elizabeth S. Drake, Box 7226, Winston-Salem, Secretary 

John G. Williard, Box 7354, Winston- Salem, Treasurer and Assistant 

Secretary 
Leslie E. Browder, Drawer 84, Winston -Salem, General Counsel 



208 



COMMITTEES OF THE TRUSTEES 



Academic Affairs: Rice, Chairman; Lee, McNeill, Poe, Smith, Mrs. C. L. 

Athletics: Wyatt, Chairman; Bridger, Hamrick, Josey, Turner. 

Building and Grounds: Holbrook, Chairman; Bates, Bradsher, Branch, 
Broyhill. 

Executive: Paschal, Chairman; Mason, Vice Chairman; Rice, Wyatt, Hol- 
brook, Philpott, Cheek, Fletcher, Cain, Branch, Davis, E. 

Finance: Philpott, Chairman; Cheek, Godwin, Nance. 

Investments: Cheek, Chairman; Avery, Collette, Culler, Davis, T. 

Planning and Development: Fletcher, Chairman; Cammack, Davis, E., 
Mason, Stokes. 

Student Life: Cain, Chairman; Graham, Kicklighter, Smith, R. F., Tate. 

Nomination of Officers of the Corporation: Rice, Chairman; Avery, Bates, 
Graham, Kicklighter. 

Nomination of Trustees: Cheek, Chairman; Cammack, Nance. 




University Mace 
209 



BOARDS OF VISITORS 

Wake Forest University 

January 1, 1974 

Chairman: Mr. Arnold Palmer 

Honorary Chairman: Mr. Walter E. Greer, Jr. 

Wake Forest College Board 

Harold T. P. Hayes, Chairman George W. Holton 

William C. Archie Hubert B. Humphrey 

George M. Boswell, Jr. R. O. Huffman (Hon) 

Robert P. Caldwell Gerald W. Johnson (Hon) 

John W. Chandler George W. Kane, Jr. 

Thomas L. Clark Joseph W. King 

Charles Cooke Petro Kulynych 

H. Max Craig, Jr. Carwile LeRoy 

Guy R. Dudley J. A. Martin, Jr. 

Arthur E. Earley John E. Maxwell 

Ralph Ellison Martin Mayer 

Floyd Fletcher Bill D. Moyers 

Frank Forsyth Eugene Owens 

Mrs. Frank Forsyth Arnold Palmer 

Walter Friedenberg K. Wayne Smith 

Walter E. Greer Zachary T. Smith 

William B. Greene, Jr. Norman Snead 

W. Burnett Harvey Charles H. Taylor 
Meade H. Willis, Jr. 

Law School Board 

Leon L. Rice, Jr., Chairman James W. Mason 

G. Eugene Boyce James R. Nance 

David M. Britt H. Henry Ramm 

Archie K. Davis Henry C. Roemer 

Marion J. Davis T. Lynwood Smith 

Fred B. Helms Hiram H. Ward 

Horace R. Kornegay McNeill Watkins 

Lex Marsh Phillip B. Whiting 

Ashley T. McCarter Larry Williams 

Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

John F. Watlington, Chairman Mrs. Frank B. Hanes 

Mrs. Smith W. Bagley P. Huber Hanes, Jr. 

Albert L. Butler, Jr. William R. Lybrook 

William B. Cash W. Roger Soles 

Richard Chatham Paul Sticht 

Thomas H. Davis Colin Stokes 

James K. Glenn Reverend Mr. Boyce Brooks 

Mrs. Bowman Gray Representative from the N. C. 

Gordon Gray Baptist Hospital Board of Trustees 

Babcock Graduate School of Management 

Mrs. Charles H. Babcock C. C. Hope, Jr. 

Irwin Belk William R. Lybrook 

Royall R. Brown E. A.. Morris 

John W. Burress, III William B. Murphy 

Robert E. Elberson David S. Peoples 

James R. Gilley Dalton D. Ruffin 

William E. Hollan Joel A. Weston 

210 



^ADMINISTRATION 



James Ralph Scales (1967) President 

B.A., Oklahpma Baptist; M.A., Ph.D., Oklahoma. 

Harold Wayland Tribble (1950-67) President Emeritus 

B.A., Richmond; Th.M., Th.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; M.A., Louis- 
ville; Ph.D., Edinburgh; D.D. Stetson; LL.D., Union University, Wake Forest, 
Richmond, Duke, North Carolina. 

Mrs. Elizabeth S. Drake (1950) Secretary of the Board of Trustees 

Edwin Graves Wilson (1946, 1951) Provost and Professor of English 

B.A., Wake Forest; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard. 

MANSON Meads (1947, 1963) Vice President for Medical Affairs 

and Professor of Medicine 

A.B., California; M.D., D.Sc, Temple. 

Eugene T. Lucas (1967) Vice President for Business and Finance 

B.A., Phillips; M.A., Denver. 

Ivy May Hixson (1973) Associate in Academic Administration 

B.A., Georgia; M.A., Ph.D., U.N.C.-Chapel Hill. 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE 

Thomas E. Mullen (1957) Dean of the College and 

Associate Professor of History 
B.A., Rollins; M.A., Ph.D., Emory University. 

Robert Allen Dyer (1956) Associate Dean of the College and 

Associate Professor of Religion 

B.A., Louisiana State; Th.M., Th.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Toby A. Hale (1970) Assistant Dean of the College 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.Div., Duke; Ed.D., Indiana. 

Mark H. Reece (1956) Dean of Men 

B.S., Wake Forest. 

Lula M. Leake (1964) Dean of Women 

B.A., Louisiana State; M.R.E., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. 
Mrs. Brenda W. Hassell (1971) Assistant Dean of Women 

B.S., Utah State; M.S., Syracuse. 

LOIS JOHNSON (1942-1962) Dean of Women Emerita 

B.A., Meredith; M.A., North Carolina. 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

Pasco M. Bowman, II (1970) Dean of the School of Law 

and Professor of Law 
B.A., Bridgewater; J.D., New York University. 

Leon H. Corbett, Jr. (1968) Assistant Dean of the School of Law 

and Associate Professor of Law 
B.A., J.D., Wake Forest. 

OFFICES OF THE BOWMAN GRAY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Richard Janeway (1966) Dean of the Bowman Gray School of 

Medicine and Professor of Neurology 
B.A., Colgate; M.D., Pennsylvania. 

NASH Herndon (1942, 1966) Associate Dean (Research Development) 

of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine 
and Professor of Medical Genetics 
A.B., Duke; M.D., Jefferson Medical College. 



* Date following name indicates year of appointment. More than one date indicates 
separate appointments. 

211 



Clyde Hardy (1941) Associate Dean (Patient Services) of the 

Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

B.A., Richmond. 

C. Douglas Maynard (1966) Associate Dean of the Bowman Gray 

School of Medicine, Professor of Radiology 
and Associate in Neurology 
B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Emery C. Miller, Jr. (1955) Associate Dean for Continuing Education, 
Professor of Medicine, and Associate in Physiology 

B.A., North Carolina; M.D., Johns Hopkins. 

Warren H. Kennedy (1971) Associate Dean (Administration) and 

Director of Division of Resource Management 

B.B.A., Houston. 

B. Lionel Truscott (1968) Assistant Dean (Admissions) 

and Professor of Neurology 
B.A., Drew; M.A., Syracuse; M.S., Ph.D., M.D., Yale. 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF THE BABCOCK 
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT 

Frank J. Schilagi (1971) Dean of the Babcock Graduate 

School of Management, and 
Associate Professor of Management 
B.B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Georgia. 

Robert W. Shively (1970) Associate Dean and Associate 

Professor of Management 
B.A., Colgate; Ed.M., Harvard; Ph.D., Cornell. 

Jon Timothy Heames (1971) Associate Dean and Lecturer in 

Management 

B.E., Youngstown; M.S., Carnegie-Mellon. 

JACK D. Ferner (1971) Director of Career Education 

and Lecturer in Management 

B.S., Rochester; M.B.A., Harvard. 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Henry Smith Stroupe (1937) Dean of the Graduate School and 

Professor of History 
B.S., M.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Duke. 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF THE SUMMER SESSION 

Percival Perry (1939, 1947) Dean of the Summer Session and 

Professor of History 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Rutgers; Ph.D., Duke. 

OFFICE OF THE TREASURER 

John G. Williard (1958) Treasurer; Assistant Secretary 

of the Board of Trustees 
B.S., North Carolina; C.P.A., North Carolina. 

Carlos O. Holder (1969) Bursar 

B.B.A., Wake Forest. 



212 



Administration 



OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Mrs. Margaret R. Perry (1947) Registrar 

B.S., South Carolina. 

Grady S. Patterson (1924-72) Registrar Emeritus 

B.A., Wake Forest. 

OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS AND FINANCIAL AID 

William G. Starling (1958) Director of Admissions and 

Financial Aid 

B.B.A., Wake Forest. 

Mrs. Shirley P. Hamrick (1957) Associate Director of Admissions 

B.A., North Carolina; M.A. in Ed., Wake Forest. 

William M. Mackie, Jr. (1964) Associate Director of Admissions 

and Financial Aid 
B.S., M.A. in Ed., Wake Forest. 

ROSS A. Griffith (1966) Assistant Director of Admissions 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.Ed., North Carolina. 

Charles M. Carter (1972) Admissions and Financial Aid Counselor 

B.S., Winston-Salem State; M.S., Indiana. 

UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 

Merrill G. Berthrong (1964) Director of Libraries and Associate 

Professor of History 

B.A., Tufts; M.A., Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy; Ph.D., Pennsylvania. 

Carlton P. West (1928) Librarian 

B.A., Boston University; M.A., Yale; B.S. in L.S., North Carolina. 

Mrs. Ethel T. Crittenden (1915-1946) Librarian Emerita 

Mrs. Vivian Lunsford Wilson ( 1960) Law Librarian 

A.B., Coker; B.S. in L.S., George Peabody. 

Jean B. Hopson (1970) Librarian of the Charles H. Babcock 

School of Business Administration 

B.S., Murray State University; M.A., George Peabody. 

Michael D. Sprinkle (1972) Librarian of the Bowman 

Gray School of Medicine 

B.A., M.S. in L.S., North Carolina. 

OFFICE OF THE CHAPLAIN 

Edgar D. Christman (1956, 1961) University Chaplain 

B.A., J.D., Wake Forest; B.D., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary; S.T.M., 
Union Theological Seminary. 

Richard W. McBride (1969) Assistant Chaplain and 

Director of the Baptist Student Union 

B.S. Ed., University of Virginia; B.D., Union Theological Seminary. 

CENTER FOR PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES 

David Allen Hills (1960) Director of the Center for Psychological 

Services and Associate Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Kansas; M.A., Ph.D., Iowa. 

David W. Catron (1963) Associate Director of the Center for 

Psychological Services and Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Furman; Ph.D., Peabody. 

Peter D. Bullard (1971) Assistant Director of the Center for 

Psychological Services and 



B.S., Hobart; Ph.D., Washington. 



Assistant Professor of Psychology 



213 



Administration 



UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICE 

Howard A. Jemison, Jr. (1964) Medical Director 

M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Mary Ann Hampton Taylor (1961) Staff Physician 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Andrew J. Crutchfield (1988) Consultant in Clinical Services 

B.S., Wake Forest: M.D., Virginia. 

OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS 

Russell H. Brantley, Jr. (1953) Assistant to the President and 

Director of Communications 
B.A.', Wake Forest. 

OFFICES OF DEVELOPMENT AND ALUMNI AFFAIRS 
J. William Straughan, Jr. (1969) Director of Development 

B.A., J.D., Wake Forest: B.D., Union Theological Seminary. 

Julius H. Corpening (1969) Director of Estate Planning 

B.A., Wake Forest; B.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

George William Joyner, Jr. (1969) Director of Alumni Affairs 

B.A., Wake Forest. 

H. Douglas Lee (1973) Director of University Relations 

B.A., Richmond; B.D., S.T.M., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Iowa. 

James P. Speer II (1971) Foundations and Corporations 

Officer and Visiting Professor of 
International Relations 
B.A., George Washington; Ph.D., Colorado. 

W. Stephen Fedora (1972) Publications Assistant 

B.A., Wake Forest. 

Martha W. Lentz (1973) Publications Assistant 

B.A., North Carolina. 

Robert D. Mills (1972) Assistant to the Director of Alumni Affairs 

B.A., Wake Forest. 

OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS 

G. Eugene Hooks (1956) Director of Athletics and Associate 

Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.Ed., North Carolina; Ed.D., George Peabody. 

Jesse I. Haddock (1952, 1954) Associate Director of Athletics 

B.S., Wake Forest. 

Bill Grogan (1974) Sports Information Director 

B.S., Memphis State. 

THE PHYSICAL PLANT 

Harold S. Moore (1953) Director of the Physical Plant 

B.M.E., Virginia. 

Royce R. WEATH3BLY (1947) Superintendent of Buildings 

Melvin Q. Laytcn (1951) Superintendent of Grounds 

B.S., Wake Forest. 

Robert B. Scales (1956) Superintendent of Building Services 

214 



Administration 



OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICIALS 

Ivey C. Gentry (1949) Director of the Office for Research 

and Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., Wake Forest; B.S., New York; M.A., Ph.D., Duke. 

Paul M. Gross, Jr. (1959) Coordinator of the Honors Program and 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Duke; Ph.D., Brown. 

Ben M. Seelbinder (1959) Director of the Office for Institutional 

Research and Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Mississippi Delta State College; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina. 

Robert N. Shorter (1958) Director of the Spring Curriculum and 

Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Union College; M.A., Ph.D., Duke. 

Charles M. Allen (1941) Director of Concerts and Lectures and 

Professor of Biology 

B.S., M.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Duke. 

Herman J. Preseren (1953) Director of the Educational Media Center 

and Professor of Education 

B.S., State Teachers College, California, Pennsylvania; M.A., Teachers College, 
Columbia; Ph.D., North Carolina. 

Thomas M. Elmore (1962) Director of Counselor Education and 

Associate Professor of Educational 
and Counseling Psychology 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., George Peabody; Ph.D., Ohio State. 

Jerry A. Hall (1958, 1961, 1967) Director of Undergraduate Teacher 
Education and Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ed.D., George Peabody. 

John William Angell (1955) Director of the Ecumenical 

Institute and Professor of Religion 

B.A., Wake Forest; Th.M., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; S.T.M., Andover 
Newton Theological School; Th.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Julian C. Burroughs, Jr. (1958) Director of Radio and 

Professor of Speech Communication and Theatre Arts 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Michigan. 

David M. Smith (1972) Executive Director of Academic 

Urban Affairs Consortium 

B.A., Bowdoin; J.D., Columbia Univ. School of Law. 

Nicholas B. Bragg (1970) Executive Director of Reynolda 

House and Lecturer in the American 
Foundations Program 
B.A., Wake Forest. 

JOHN F. Reed (1963) Director of Personnel and Placement 

A.B., Pennsylvania State; M.A., Washington and Jefferson. 

Manuel R. Cunard (1972) Director of the College Union and 

Assistant to the Dean of Men 

B.S., M.A., Rhode Island. 

Mrs. Jeannie K. A. Thomas (1972) Director of Housing 

B.A., M.A., Denver. 

William C. Raizor (1973) Coordinator of Counseling in 

Men's Residence Halls 

B.A., Louisville; M.S., Indiana. 

Richard T. Clay (1956) Manager of the College Book Store 

B.B.A., Wake Forest. 

215 







216 



*PROFESSORS EMERITI 

Andrew Lewis Aycock (1928-1971) Professor Emeritus of English 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Tulane. 

Dalma Adolph Brown (1941-1973) Professor Emeritus of English 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina. 

Forrest W. Clonts (1922-24; 1925-67) Professor Emeritus of History 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ohio State. 

ELTON C. COCKE (1938-1971) Professor Emeritus of Biology 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Virginia. 

CRONJE B. Earp (1940-1971) Professor Emeritus of Classical Languages 

and Literature 
B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia. 

J. Allen Easley (1928-1963) Professor Emeritus of Religion 

B.A., D.D., Furman; Th.M., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Edgar Estes Folk (1936-67) Professor Emeritus of English 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.S., Columbia; Ph.D., George Peabody. 
Roland L. Gay (1933-72) Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.S., North Carolina State. 

RALPH Cyrus Heath (1954-1969) Professor Emeritus of Marketing 

Charles H. Babcock School of Business Administration 
A.B., Princeton; M.B.A., D.B.A., Indiana. 

Owen F. Herring (1946-1963) Professor Emeritus of Religion 

B.A., M.A., Wake Forest; Th.M., Th.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; 
D.D., Georgetown College. 

**Hubert A. Jones (1908-1959) Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 

B.A., M.A., LL.B., Wake Forest. 

Henry Broadus Jones (1924-1959) Professor Emeritus of English 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Chicago. 

Jasper L. Memory, Jr. (1929-1971) Professor Emeritus of Education 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Columbia. 

Harold Dawes Parcell (1935-1970) Professor Emeritus of French 

B. A.,- North Carolina; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard. 

Kenneth Tyson Raynor (1926-1961) Professor Emeritus 

of Mathematics 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Duke. 

Albert C. Reid (1917-18; 1920-65) Professor Emeritus of Philosophy 

B.A., M.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Cornell. 

Karl Myron Scott (1955-1971) Professor Emeritus of Management, 
Charles H. Babcock School of Business Administration 
B.A., Arkansas; M.S., Iowa State College; Ph.D., Illinois. 

Carroll W. Weathers (1950-72) Professor Emeritus of Law and 

Dean Emeritus of the School of Law 

B.A., LL.B., Wake Forest. 



* Dates following names indicate period of service. 
** Died, February 6, 1974. 



217 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

1974-75 
Effective September 1, 1974 

The terms of members, except where otherwise shown, expire on 
August 31 of the year indicated. Each committee selects its own chair- 
man except where the chairman is designated. All members of a com- 
mittee vote except as otherwise indicated. 

Admissions 
Non-voting. Director of Admissions, Associate Dean of the College, Dean 
of Women, and one student in Wake Forest College. 

Voting. 1977 Carter, Tedford; 1976 Hadley, Kenion; 1975 Dimmick, 
Moorhouse, and one student in Wake Forest College. 

Advisory Council to Lower Division 
Waddill, Chairman; Angell, Barefield, Brehme, Broyles, Carmichael, 
Collins, Covey, Dimmick, Dimock, Ewing, Frey, Gossett, P. J. Hamrick, 
Harris, Hayes, Hester, Horton, Hottinger, Kerr, Kuhn, Kuzmanovich, 
Ljungquist, Maultsby, W. G. May, Meyer, Milner, Mitchell, Noftle, 
Nowell, Pritchard, Reeves, Reinhardt, P. S. Robinson, W. D. Sanders, 
Scott, Sears, Sellner, Sinclair, J. H. Smith, Sullivan, Taylor, Tedford, 
Thomas, Weigl, West, Whitchurch, G. P. Williams, Wolfe, Woodmansee, 
Wyatt. 

Athletics 
Administrative: Vice President for Business and Finance, Dean of the 
College, Faculty Representative to ACC; 1979 Sears, Wagstaff; 1978 
Brehme, Reinhardt; 1977 Milner, Preseren; 1976 Baxley, Crisp; 1975 
Bryant, Christman. 

Buildings and Grounds 
Administrative: Provost, Dean of the College, Treasurer, Registrar, 
Director of the Physical Plant; 1979 Weigl, 1978 Patrick; 1977 MitcheU, 
1976 Owen, 1975 Seelbinder and two students from Wake Forest College 
(one voting and one non-voting). 

College Review Board 
Taylor 1975 and Hottinger 1974 (from the Student Life Committee); 
Catron 1975 and Sears 1974 (from the Executive Committee) ; G. P. 
Williams 1975 and Reinhardt 1974 (from the University Senate) ; and 
two student members, selected by the Student Legislature. 

Curriculum 
Provost, Dean of the College, Registrar, and the chairman of each 
department of Wake Forest College as follows: Art, Biology, Business 
and Accountancy, Chemistry, Classical Languages, Economics, Education, 
English, German, History, Mathematics, Military Science, Music, Phi- 

218 



Committees 



losophy, Physical Education, Physics, Politics, Psychology, Religion, 
Romance Languages, Sociology and Anthropology, Speech Communication 
and Theatre Arts. 

Executive 
Non-voting. Provost, Associate Dean of the College, Dean of Men, Dean 
of Women, and one student in Wake Forest College. 

Voting. Dean of the College; 1977 Barrow, Shorter; 1976 Andronica, 
Hendricks; 1975 Barnett, Catron; and one student in Wake Forest College. 

Faculty Marshals 
1977 Webster; 1976 M. F. Robinson; 1975 Parker. 

Graduate Council 
Dean of the Graduate School, Chairman; Provost, Coordinator of Grad- 
uate Studies of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine; 1978 Esch; 1977 
Hayes, 1976 Reeves, 1975 Waddill; 1974 Fosso, St. Clair. 

Honors 
Dean of the College; Coordinator of the Honors Program; 1978 Barefield, 
1977 Rodtwitt, 1976 Collins, 1975 Weigl, and two students in Wake Forest 
College (one voting and one non-voting). 

Library Planning 
Regular. Director of Libraries; Librarian; 1977 Flory, Miller; 1976 Fosso, 
Harris; 1975 Horton, Zuber; and two students in Wake Forest College 
(one voting and one non-voting) . 

Occasional. Provost, Dean of the Graduate School, Dean of the College, 
Chairmen of all departments (as under Curriculum Committee above) . 

Nominations 
1977 E. W. Hamrick, Reinhardt; 1976 Hills, Weigl; 1975 Gross, Lovett. 

Open Curriculum 
P. J. Hamrick, Chairman; Evans, Phillips, Pritchard, Reinhardt, J. H. 
Smith, Tedford, Thomas. 

Orientation 
Chairman of the Advisory Council to the Lower Division, Chairman; 
Dean of the College, Dean of Men, Dean of Women, President of the 
Student Government. 

Publications 
Dean of the College, Treasurer, Director of Communications; Faculty 
advisers of Old Gold and Black, Howler, and Student; 1977 Milner, 1976 
Gossett, 1975 Potter. 

ROTC Board 
Coordinator Helm, Professor of Military Science, 1977 Preseren, 1976 
J. G. May, 1975 Ellison. 

219 



Committees 



Scholarships and Student Aid 

Director of Admissions and Financial Aid, Associate Dean of the College, 
Dean of Women; 1977 Giles, Talbert; 1976 Kuhn, Schoonmaker, 1975 
Broyles, W. G. May; and two students in Wake Forest College (one 
voting and one non-voting). 

Student Life 

Non-voting. Provost, Dean of the College, Dean of Women, Dean of Men, 
Chaplain. 

Voting. 1977 Dimock, Falkenberg, Woodall; 1976 Perricone, Steintrager, 
Taylor; 1975 Carter, Hills, Hottinger; and six students in Wake Forest 
College. 

Faculty Members (Non- Voting) on the Student Honor Council 
1977 P. J. Hamrick, 1976 Carmichael, 1975 Collins. 

Faculty Members (Non- Voting) on the Student Judicial Board 

1977 Dufort, 1976 Becker, 1975 Litcher. 

Teacher Education 

Chairman of the Department of Education, Dean of the Graduate School, 
Dean of the College; 1977 Broyles, Woodmansee; 1976 Frey, Richman; 

1975 Dimmick, T. McDonald. 

Traffic Commission 

Director of the Physical Plant; 1977 Crisp, Moses; 1976 Tefft, Woodman- 
see; 1975 Casey, Sellner; and six students in Wake Forest College. 

University Senate 

President, Provost, Vice President for Medical Affairs, Vice President for 
Business and Finance, Dean of the College, Dean of the School of Law, 
Dean of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Dean of the Charles H. 
Babcock School of Management, Dean of the Graduate School, Director 
of Libraries, Director of Development, and the following: 

Representatives of Wake Forest College: 1977 Cage, Phillips; 1976 Rein- 
hardt, A. S. Tillett; 1975 Owen, G. P. Williams; 1974 Pritchard, Shorter. 

Representatives of the School of Law: 1977 Webster; 1975 Lee. 

Representatives of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine: 1977 Huntley; 

1976 Prichard; 1975 Cowgill; 1974 Meredith. 

Representatives of the School of Management: 1977 Edwards, Shiveley. 

Representatives of the Graduate School: 1977 L. R. Tillett; 1976 Shields; 
1975 Nowell; 1974 Seelbinder. 



220 



INSTRUCTION* 

Charles M. Allen Professor of Biology and Director of 

Concerts and Lectures 

(See Administration) 

Ralph D. Amen (1962) Associate Professor of Biology 

A.B., A.M., University of Northern Colorado; M.B.S., Ph.D., Colorado. 

John Louis Andronica (1969) Assistant Professor of 

Classical Languages 

B.A., Holy Cross; M.A., Boston College; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins. 

John William Angell (1955) Professor of Religion 

(See Administration) 

H. Wallace Baird (1963) Associate Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., Berea; Ph.D., Wisconsin. 

Eugene Pendleton Banks (1954) Professor of Anthropology 

B.A., Furman; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard. 

James Pierce Barefield (1963) Associate Professor of History 

B.A., M.A., Rice; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins. 

Richard Chambers Barnett (1961) Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.Ed., Ph.D., North Carolina. 

Harold M. Barrow (1948) Professor of Physical Education 

A.B., Westminster; M.A., Missouri; P.E.D., Indiana. 

William P. Baumgarth (1973) Instructor in Politics 

A.B., Fordham; M.A. Harvard. 

John V. Baxley (1968) Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., Georgia Tech.; Ph.D., Wisconsin. 

Robert Clarence Beck (1959) Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Ph.D., Illinois. 

Veryl E. Becker (1969) Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., Gustavus Adolphus; M.S., South Dakota State; Ph.D., Michigan State. 

Richard Gordon Bell (1965) Professor of Law 

B.A., Kentucky; J.D., LL.M., Western Reserve. 

James M. Bennett (1973) Instructor in Art 

B.F.A., Virginia Commonwealth; M.F.A., U.N.C. -Greensboro. 

Merrill G. Berthrong Associate Professor of History and Director 

of Libraries 

(See Administration) 

Deborah L. Best (1973) Instructor in Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Wake Forest. 

Miles O. Bidwell (1972) Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Columbia. 

Rhoda Bryan Billings (1973) Assistant Professor of Law 

B.A., Berea; J.D., Wake Forest. 

James Carey Blalock (1950) Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., M.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Florida. 

Ronald L. Blankespoor (1973) Visiting Assistant Professor of 

Chemistry 

B.A., Dordt; Ph.D., Iowa State. 

Dale E. Bonnette (1970) Instructor in English 

A.B., M.A., Missouri. 

William Thomas Boone (1973) Lecturer in Physical Education 

B.S., M .Ed., Northwestern State University. 

* Names are arranged alphabetically. Date following names indicates year of appoint- 
ment. More than one date indicates separate appointments. 

221 



Faculty 

Pasco Middleton Bowman, II Professor of Law and 

(See Administration) Dean of the School of Law 

Sterling M. Boyd (1968) Associate Professor of Art History 

B.A., Sewanee; M.A., Oberlin; Ph.D., Princeton. 

Nicholas B. Bragg (1967) Lecturer in the American Foundations 

Program and Director of Reynolda House 

(See Administration) 

Germaine Bree (1973) Kenan Professor of Humanities 

Licence, D.E.S., Agregation, University of Paris. 

Robert W. Brehme (1959) Professor of Physics 

B.S., Roanoke; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina. 

George W. Brooker, Jr. (1973) Assistant Professor of Management, 

Babcock Graduate School of Management 
B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Northwestern. 

David B. Broyles (1966) Associate Professor of Politics 

B.A., Chicago; B.A., Florida; M.A., Ph.D., UCLA. 

George McLeod Bryan (1956) Professor of Religion 

B.A., M.A., Wake Forest; B.D., Ph.D., Yale. 

Shasta M. Bryant (1966) Associate Professor of Spanish 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina. 

Peter D. Bullard (1971) Assistant Professor of Psychology and 

Assistant Director of the Center for Psychological Services 

(See Administration) 

George Leslie Burke (1973) Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., M.A., Wake Forest University. 

Julian C. Burroughs, Jr. (1958) Professor of Speech Communication 

and Theatre Arts 
B. A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Michigan. 

William E. Cage (1967) Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., Rockford; Ph.D., Virginia. 

Ruth F. Campbell (1962) Professor of Spanish 

B.A., Woman's College, North Carolina; M.A., North Carolina; Ph.D., Duke. 

Robert S. Carlson (1969) Professor of Management, Babcock 

Graduate School of Management 
S.B., M.I.T.; M.B.A., Ph.D., Stanford. 

Richard D. Carmichael (1971) Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Wake Forest; A.M., Ph.D., Duke. 

John Archer Carter, Jr. (1961) Professor of English 

B.A., Virginia; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton. 

Dorothy Casey (1949) Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Woman's College, North Carolina; M.A., North Carolina. 

David W. Catron (1963) Associate Professor of Psychology and 

Associate Director of the Center for Psychological Services 
B.A., Furman; Ph.D., Peabody. 

Kanak K. CHOPRA Assistant Professor of Management, 

Babcock Graduate School of Management 

B. Tech., Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, India; M.E., Ph.D., Cornell Uni- 
versity. 

Joe P. Coffman (1973) Major, Infantry, U. S. Army; 

Professor of Military Science 
B.B.A., Marshall; M.A.Ed., Wake Forest. 

John E. Collins (1970) Assistant Professor of Religion 

B.S., M.S., Tennessee; B.D., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Princeton. 

222 



Faculty 

Leon P. Cook, Jr. (1957) Associate Professor of Accountancy 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic; M.S., Tennessee; C.P.A., Arkansas. 

Paul E. Cook, Jr. (1974) Captain, Field Artillery, U. S. Army; 

Assistant Professor of Military Science 

B.S., Kansas State; M.A.Ed., Wake Forest. 

Leon Henry Corbett, Jr. Associate Professor of Law 

(See Administration) 

Cyclone Covey (1968) Professor of History 

B.A., Ph.D., Stanford. 

Marjorie Crisp (1947) Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Appalachian State Teachers College; M.A., George Peabody. 

James A. Dervin (1970) Instructor in English 

B.A., M.A., St. Louis. 

John F. Dimmick (1961)_ Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., M.S., Western Illinois; Ph.D., Illinois. 

Ronald V. Dimock, Jr. (1970) Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A., New Hampshire; M.S., Florida State; Ph.D., California. 

Hugh William Divine (1954) Professor of Law 

B.S., Georgia State College for Men; M.A., Louisiana State; J.D., Emory; LL.M., 
S.J.D., Michigan. 

Robert H. Dufort (1961) Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Ph.D., Duke. 

Robert Allen Dyer Associate Professor of Religion and 

(See Administration) Associate Dean 

John R. Earle (1963) Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina. 

Neal F. Earls (1973) Instructor in Physical Education 

B.A., University of South Florida; M.A., Wake Forest University. 

Edwin L. Earp (1972) Captain, Armor, U. S. Army; 

Assistant Professor of Military Science 
B.A., Western Maryland; M.Ed., Georgia State. 

W. Franklin Edwards (1970) Associate Professor of Management, 

Babcock Graduate School of Management 
B.S., Clemson; M.B.A., Indiana; Ph.D., Florida. 

Leo Ellison, Jr. (1957) Assistant Professor of Physical Education; 

Swimming Coach 
B.S., M.S., Northwestern State College. 

THOMAS M. Elmore (1962) Associate Professor of Educational and 

Counseling Psychology; Director of Counselor Education; 

Associate Director for Counselor Training 

(See Administration) of the Center for Psychological Services 

Miriam F. Engelsohn (1972) Instructor in Romance Languages 

B.A., Brooklyn; M.A., Columbia. 

Gerald W. Esch (1965) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., Colorado CoUege; M.S., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma. 

* David K. Evans (1966) Associate Professor of Anthropology 

B.S., Tulane; Ph.D., California. 

Stephen Ewing (1971) Assistant Professor of Business 

B.S., Howard Payne; M.B.A., Baylor. 

Philippe R. Falkenberg (1969) Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Queen's (Ontario); Ph.D., Duke. 



* Absent on leave, Fall 1973. 



223 



Faculty 



Esron McGruder Faris, Jr. (1957, 1967) 

B.A., J.D., Washington and Lee; LL.M., Duke 



Jack D. Ferner (1971) 

(See Administration) 



Professor of Law 

Lecturer in Management and 
Director of Career Education 



*Jack D. Fleer (1964) Associate Professor of Politics 

A.B., Oklahoma Baptist; M.S., Florida State; Ph.D., North Carolina. 

Walter S. Flory (1963) Babcock Professor of Botany; Director 

of Reynolda Gardens 

B.A., Bridgewater; M.A., Ph.D., Virginia; Sc.D., Bridgewater. 

Doyle Richard Fosso (1964) 

A.B., Harvard; M.A., Michigan; Ph.D., Harvard. 



Associate Professor of English 



Ralph S. Fraser (1962) 

B.A., Boston; M.A., Syracuse; Ph.D., Illinois. 



Professor of German 



Donald E. Frey (1972) Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A., Wesleyan; M. Div., Yale; Ph.D., Princeton. 



Stephen J. Gamble (1973) 

B.A., Siena College. 

Ivey C. Gentry (1949) 

(See Administration) 

Christopher Giles (1951) 

B.S., Florida Southern; M.A., George Peabody. 

Balkrishna Govind Gokhale (1960) 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Bombay. 

Thomas Frank Gossett (1967) 

B.A., M.A., Southern Methodist; Ph.D., Minnesota. 

Murray C. Greason, Jr. (1973) 

B.S., J.D., Wake Forest. 



Major, Field Artillery, U. S. Army; 
Assistant Professor of Military Science 

Professor of Mathematics 
Assistant Professor of Music 



Professor of History and 
Asian Studies 



George J. Griffin (1948) 

B.A., Wake Forest; Th.B. 
Edinburgh. 



Professor of English 

Lecturer in Law 

Professor of Religion 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; B.D., Yale; Ph.D., 



Mrs. Penny Crawford Griffin (1969) 

B.A., Appalachian; M.A., Florida State. 



Instructor in Art History 



Paul M. Gross, Jr. 

(See Administration) 

William H. Gulley (1966) 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina. 



David Warren Hadley ( 1966) 

B.A., Wake Forest; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard. 

** Jerry A. Hall (1958, 1961, 1967) 

(See Administration) 

Emmett Willard Hamrick (1952) 

A.B., North Carolina; Ph.D., Duke. 

Phillip J. Hamrick, Jr. (1956) 

B.S., Morris Harvey; Ph.D., Duke. 

Francoise Hansberger (1972) 

Licence, Agregation, Paris. 



Associate Professor of Chemistry 
and Coordinator of the Honors Program 

Associate Professor of Sociology 

Assistant Professor of History 

Associate Professor of Education 

Professor of Religion 

Professor of Chemistry 

Lecturer in French 



* Absent on leave, Fall 1973. 
'* Absent on leave, Spring 1974. 



224 



Faculty 

Carl V. Harris (1956) Professor of Classical Languages and Literature 

B.A., Wake Forest; B.D., S.T.M., Yale; Ph.D., Duke. 

Ysbrand Haven (1965) Professor of Physics 

Candidate, Doctorandus, Doctor, Groningen. 

Elmer K. Hayashi (1973) Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., U.C. at Davis; M.S., San Diego State; Ph.D., Illinois. 

Merwyn A. Hayes (1967) Associate Professor of Speech Communication 

and Theater Arts 

B.A., Macalester; M.A., Oregon; Ph.D., Illinois. 

J. Timothy Heames (1971) Lecturer in Management and 

Associate Dean of the Babcock Graduate School 

of Management 

(See Administration) 

Nathan Rick Heatley (1970) Instructor in Classical Languages 

B.A., Baylor; M.A., Texas. 

Roger A. Hegstrom (1969) Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., St. Olaf; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard. 

Robert Meredith Helm (1940) Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Duke. 

J. Edwin Hendricks (1961) Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Furman; M.A., Ph.D., Virginia. 

Marcus B. Hester (1963) Associate Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Vanderbilt. 

David Allen Hills (1960) Associate Professor of Psychology and 

Director of the Center for Psychological Services 
A.B., Kansas; M.A., Ph.D., Iowa. 

Donald Dennis Hoirup (1972) Instructor in Music 

B.M., M.S., Juilliard. 

Joseph P. Hollis, Jr. (1971) Captain, Infantry, U. S. Army; 

and Assistant Professor of Military Science 
B.S., North Georgia College. 

Wesley D. Hood (1968) Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Univ. of Washington; M.Ed., North Dakota; Ed.D., Ball State. 

Fred L. Horton, Jr. (1970) Assistant Professor of Religion 

. A.B., North Carolina; B.D., Union Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Duke. 

William L. Hottinger (1970) Assistant Professor of 

Physical Education 
B.S., Pennsylvania State College; M.S., Ph.D., Illinois. 

Fredric T. Howard (1966) Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., M.A., Vanderbilt; Ph.D., Duke. 

Calvin R. Huber ( 1962) Associate Professor of Music 

B.M., M.M., Wisconsin; Ph.D., North Carolina. 

G. Dudley Humphrey, Jr. (1973) Lecturer in Law 

A.B., Duke; J.D., North Carolina. 

*Delmer P. Hylton (1949) Professor of Accountancy 

B.S., M.B.A., Indiana; C.P.A., Indiana. 

Charles Philip Johnson (1971) Instructor in Spanish 

BA., Colorado; M.A., Florida State. 

Mrs. Patricia Adams Johnson (1969) Instructor in English 

B.A., Winston-Salem State; M.A., Wake Forest. 

Dillon Johnston (1973) Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Vanderbilt; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., Virginia. 



* Absent on leave, 1973-74. 

225 



Faculty 

H. Russell Johnston, Jr. (1971) Assistant Professor of Management, 

Babcock Graduate School of Management 

(See Administration) 

Alonzo W. Kenion (1956) Associate Professor of English 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Duke. 

William C. Kerr (1970) Assistant Professor of Phvsics 

B.S., Wooster; Ph.D., Cornell. 

Harry Lee King, Jr. (1960) Professor of Spanish 

B.A., Richmond; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina. 

Theodore D. Klastorin Assistant Professor of Management, 

Babcock Graduate School of Management 

B.S., Carnegie-Mellon University; Ph.D., University of Texas. 

Gail Patricia Klock (1973) Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., Colorado State; M.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

Raymond E. Kuhn (1968) Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., Carson-Newman; Ph.D., Tennessee. 

James Kuzmanovich (1972) Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Rose Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D., Wisconsin. 

Hugo C. Lane (1973) Lecturer in Biology and Research Associate 

in Otolaryngology (Bowman Gray School of Medicine) 

Licenciate of the Biological Sciences; Doctorate of the Biological Sciences, Geneva. 

Henry Conrad Lauerman (1963) Professor of Law 

B.S., U. S. Naval Academy; J.D., LL.M., Georgetown; LL.M., Duke. 

Robert E. Lee (1946) Professor of Law 

B.S., LL.B., Wake Forest; M.A. in Public Law, Columbia; LL.M., S.J.D., Duke. 

Jack M. Levitz (1972) Captain, Infantry, U. S. Army; 

Assistant Professor of Military Science 

B.S., University of Hawaii. 

Charles M. Lewis (1968) Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Vanderbilt; Th.M., Harvard. 

John Hannibal Litcher (1973) Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Winona State College; M.A., Ph.D., Minnesota. 

Gary Richard Ljungquist (1972) Assistant Professor of French 

B.A., Clark; Ph.D., Cornell. 

Randolph Edward Lobb (1973) Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Toronto; M.A., Virginia; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton. 

Marvin D. Loper (1970) Assistant Professor of Management, 

Babcock Graduate School of Management 

B.S., New Mexico; M.S., California State (San Diego); Ph.D., UCLA. 
Robert V/illiam Lovett (1962, 1968) Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Oglethorpe; M.A., Ph.D., Emory. 

Nancy Jane McCaskey (1969) Instructor in English 

B.A., Marshall; M.A., North Carolina. 

James C. McDonald (1960) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., Washington University, St. Louis; M.A., Ph.D., Missouri. 

Thane McDonald (1941) Professor of Music 

B.M., M.M., Michigan; Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia. 

* James G. McDowell (1965) Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Colgate; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins. 

226 



Faculty 



Kenneth Richard McWilliams (1969) 

B.A., M.A., University of Oklahoma. 



Don M. Maultsby (1970) 

B.A., Wofford; Ph.D., Tulane. 

J. Gaylord May (1961) 

B.S., Wofford; M.A., Ph.D., Virginia. 

W. Graham May (1961) 

B.S., Wofford; M.A., Ph.D., Virginia. 

J. Rodney Meyer (1970) 

B.A., Brown; M.A., Minnesota. 

Harry B. Miller (1947) 

B.S., Ph.D., North Carolina. 

Joseph O. Milner (1969) 

B.A., Davidson; M.A., Ph.D. 



Instructor in Anthropology 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Instructor in English 

Professor of Chemistry 

Assistant Professor of English 



North Carolina. 

Carlton T. Mitchell (1961) Associate Professor of Religion 

B.A., Wake Forest; B.D., Yale; S.T.M., Union Theological Seminary, New York; 
Ph.D., New York University. 



John C. Moorhouse (1969) 

A.B., Wabash; Ph.D., Northwestern. 

Ernest Pierre Morenon (1973) 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University; M.A., 

Carl C. Moses (1964) 

A.B., William and Mary; M.A., Ph.D. 

William M. Moss (1971) 

B.A., Davidson. 

Thomas E. Mullen 

(See Administration) 



Ronald E. Noftle (1967) 

B.S., New Hampshire; Ph.D. 



Washington. 



John W. Nowell (1945) 

B.S., Wake Forest; Ph.D., North Carolina. 



Assistant Professor of Economics 
Instructor in Anthropology 

Southern Methodist University. 

Associate Professor of Politics 

North Carolina. 



Instructor in English 

Associate Professor of History 
and Dean of the College 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Professor of Chemistry 

Professor of German 



James C. O'Flaherty (1947) 

B.A., Georgetown College; M.A., Kentucky; Ph.D., Chicago 

Aulsey Thomas Olive (1961) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State. 

Jeanne Owen Professor of Business Law, 

Babcock School of Business Administration 

B.S., U.N.C.-Greensboro; M.C.S., Indiana; J.D., U.N.C. -Chapel Hill. 



John Ernest Parker, Jr. (1950) 

B.A., Wake Forest; A.M., Ph.D., Syracuse. 

Clarence H. Patrick (1946) 

B.A., Wake Forest; B.D., Andover Newton; Ph.D. 



Professor of Romance Languages 
and Education 



Duke. 



Professor of Sociology 



Rosemarie Anderson Patty (1973) Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Central (Iowa); M.A., Ph.D., Nebraska. 

Peter R. Peacock (1970) Instructor in Management, 

Babcock Graduate School of Management 

A.B., Northeastern; M.S., Georgia; M.B.A., Chicago. 



* Absent on leave, 1973-74. 



227 



Faculty 

Philip J. Perricone (1967) Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.S., M.A., University of Florida; Ph.D., Kentucky. 
Percival Perry Professor of History and Dean of the Summer Session 

(See Administration) 

Sylvester Petro (1973) Professor of Law 

A.B., J.D., Chicago; LL.M., Michigan. 

Elizabeth Phillips (1957) Professor of English 

A.B., Women's College, North Carolina; M.A., State University of Iowa; Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania. 

M. Elizabeth Place (1969) Instructor in German 

A.B., Duke; M.A., Vanderbilt. 

Dominique Plassard (1973) Instructor in French 

Licence, University of Dijon, France. 

Edward H. Platte (1968) Instructor in History 

B.A., Princeton; M.A., Stanford. 

Lee Harris Potter (1965) Associate Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina. 

Herman J. Preseren (1953) Professor of Education 

(See Administration) 

Gregory D. Pritchard (1968) Associate Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Oklahoma Baptist; B.D., Southern Baptist Theol. Seminary; Ph.D., Columbia. 

*Ray Prohaska (1969) Artist in Residence 

Mrs. Beulah Lassiter Raynor (1946) Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., East Carolina Teachers College; M.A., Wake Forest. 

J. Don Reeves (1967) Associate Professor of Education 

A.B., Mercer; B.D., Th.M., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Ed.D., Columbia. 

Jon M. Reinhardt (1964) Associate Professor of Politics 

B.A., Birmingham-Southern; M.A., Ph.D., Tulane. 

Harold C. Rhea (1968) Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

and Cross Country and Track Coach 

B.S., Midland Lutheran; M.A., Ed.D., Colorado State. 

Paul M. Ribisl (1973) Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.A., Kent State; Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Claud Henry Richards, Jr. (1952) Professor of Politics 

B.A., Texas Christian; M.A., Ph.D., Duke. 

Charles L. Richman (1968) Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Virginia; M.S., Yeshiva; Ph.D., Cincinnati. 

Jennie Lou Robinson (1973) Instructor in Spanish 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Middlebury College. 

Mrs. Mary Frances McFeeters Robinson (1952) Professor of French 

B.A., Wilson College; M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse. 

Paul S. Robinson (1952) Professor of Music 

B.A., Westminster College; Mus.B., Curtis Institute of Music; M.Sac. Mus., D.Sac. 
Mus., School of Sacred Music, Union Theological Seminary. 

Eva Maria Rodtwitt (1966) Lecturer in French 

Cand. Philol., Oslo. 

Michael Roman (1973) Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Harvard; M.A., Ph.D., Pennsylvania. 

Charles P. Rose, Jr. (1973) Assistant Professor of Law 

A.B., William and Mary; J.D., Case Western Reserve. 

Franklyn F. Sanders (1971) Instructor in Classical Languages 

A.B., Wofford; M.A., Georgia. 



* Absent on leave, 1973-74. 

228 



Faculty 

Wilmer D. Sanders (1954, 1964) Associate Professor of German 

B.A., Muhlenberg; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana. 

John W. Sawyer ( 1956) Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., M.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Missouri 

Frank J. Schilagi (1971) Associate Professor of Management and 

Dean of the Babcock Graduate School 
of Management 

(See Administration) 

Donald O. Schoonmaker (1965) Associate Professor of Politics 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton. 

Frank L. Scott (1969) Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Tulane; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State. 

Richard D. Sears (1964) Assistant Professor of Politics 

A.B., Clark; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana. 

Ben M. Seelbinder (1959) Professor of Mathematics 

(See Administration) 

William S. Sekely (1974) Instructor in Business and Accountancy 

B.S., Allegheny; M.B.A., Case Westeran Reserve. 

Timothy F. Sellner (1970) Assistant Professor of German 

B.A., Michigan; M.A., Wayne State; Ph.D., Michigan. 

Bynum Gillette Shaw (1965) Lecturer in Journalism 

B.A., Wake Forest. 

Howard William Shields (1958) Professor of Physics 

B.S., North Carolina; M.S., Pennsylvania State; Ph.D., Duke. 

Phillip Stanley Shinoda Instructor in Management, 

Babcock Graduate School of Management 
B.A., University of California; M.B.A., University of California. 

Franklin R. Shirley (1948) Professor of Speech Communication 

and Theatre Arts 
B.A., Georgetown College; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., Florida. 

Robert W. Shively (1970) Associate Dean, and Associate Professor 

of Management, Babcock Graduate School of Management 

(See Administration) 

Richard Lee Shoemaker (1950) Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., Colgate; M.A., Syracuse; Ph.D., Virginia. 

David F. Shores (1972) Associate Professor of Law 

B.B.A., J.D., Iowa; LL.M., Georgetown. 

Robert N. Shorter (1958) Associate Professor of English 

(See Administration) 

Michael L. Sinclair (1968) Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Stanford. 

James E. Sizemore (1953) Professor of Law 

B.S., East Tennessee State; J.D., Wake Forest; LL.M., New York University. 

David L. Smiley (1950) Professor of History 

B.A., M.A., Baylor; Ph.D., Wisconsin. 

Charles W. Smith (1969) Instructor in Music 

B.M., Wyoming; M.A., New York University. 

J. Howell Smith (1965) Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Baylor; M.A., Tulane; Ph.D., Wisconsin. 

* James A. Steintrager (1969) Associate Professor of Politics 

B.A., Notre Dame; M.A., Ph.D., Chicago. 



* Absent on leave, 1973-74. 

229 



Faculty 

Henry Smith Stroupe (1937) Professor of History and 

(See Administration) Dean of the Graduate School 

Robert L. Sullivan (1962) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., Delaware; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State. 

Charles H. Talbert (1963) Associate Professor of Religion 

B.A., Howard; B.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Vanderbilt. 

Thomas C. Taylor (1971) Assistant Professor of Accounting 

B.S., M.A., North Carolina; Ph.D., Louisiana State. 

Harold C. Tedford (1965) Associate Professor of Speech Communication 

and Theatre Arts 

B.A., Ouachita; M.A., Arkansas; Ph.D., Louisiana State. 

Stanton K. Tefft (1964) Associate Professor of Anthropology 

B.A., Michigan State; M.S., Wisconsin; Ph.D., Minnesota. 

Dan R. E. Thomas (1972) Assistant Professor of Management, 

Bahcock Graduate School of Management 
B.S., U. S. Air Force Academy; M.B.A., Ohio State University; Ph.D., University of 
Washington. 

Mary Beth Thomas (1971) Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A., Agnes Scott; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina. 

Neal B. Thornton (1967) Assistant Professor of Politics 

B.A., Ph.D., Virginia. 

Mrs. Anne S. Tillett (1965) Associate Professor of Romance 

Languages 
B.A., Carson-Newman; M.A., Vanderbilt; Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

Lowell R. Tillett (1956) Professor of History 

B.A., Carson-Newman; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., North Carolina. 

Thomas J. Turner (1952) Professor of Physics 

B.S., North Carolina; M.S., Clemson; Ph.D., Virginia. 

Robert Warren Ulery, Jr. (1971) Assistant Professor of Classical 

Languages 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Yale. 

Lorraine Van Meter (1968) Instructor in History 

B.A., M.A., U.C.L.A. 

Robert H. Vorsteg (1970) Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Florida State; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State. 

Marcellus E. Waddill (1962) Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Hampden-Sydney; M.A., Ph.D., Pittsburgh. 

J. Van Wagstaff (1964) Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., Randolph-Macon; M.B.A., Rutgers; Ph.D., Virginia. 

George K. Walker (1972) Associate Professor of Law 

B.A., Alabama; LL.B., Vanderbilt; M.A., Duke; LL.M., Virginia 

James A. Webster, Jr. (1951, 1954) Professor of Law 

B.S., LL.B., Wake Forest; S.J.D., Harvard 

Peter D. Weigl (1968) Assistant Professor of Biology 

A.B., Williams; Ph.D., Duke. 

David Welker (1969) Professor of Speech Communication 

and Theatre Arts 
B.A., M.A., University of Illinois; Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Larry E. West (1969) Assistant Professor of German 

A.B., Berea; Ph.D., Vanderbilt. 

Frank H. Whitchurch (1971) Instructor in Spanish 

B.S., M.A., Minnesota; M.A., Ohio State. 



Absent on leave, Fall 1973. 

230 



Faculty 

Robert N. White Associate Director of Executive Programs, and 

Lecturer, Babcock Graduate School of Management 

A.B., Harvard College; I. A., Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration. 

A. Tennyson WILLIAMS (1971) Instructor in Speech Communication 

and Theatre Arts 
A.B., Duke; M.A., Wake Forest. 

George P. Williams (1971) Professor of Physics 

B.S., Richmond; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina. 

John Edwin Williams (1959) Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Richmond; M.A., Ph.D., Iowa. 

Edwin Graves Wilson Professor of English and Provost 

(See Administration) 

Donald H. Wolfe (1968) Assistant Professor of Speech Communication 

and Theatre Arts 
B.S., M.S., Southern Illinois; Ph.D., Cornell. 

Frank B. Wood (1971) Instructor in Psychology 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary; M.A., Wake 
Forest. 

Ralph C. Wood, Jr. (1971) Instructor in Religion 

B.A., M.A., East Texas State; M.A., University of Chicago. 

J. Ned Woodall (1969) Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

B.A., M.A., Texas; Ph.D., Southern Methodist. 

John J. Woodmansee (1965) Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Westminster; M.A., Denver; Ph.D., Colorado. 

Raymond L. Wyatt (1956) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina. 

Wilfred Buck Yearns, Jr. (1945) Professor of History 

B.A., Duke; M.A., Georgia; Ph.D., North Carolina. 

John M. Zerba (1973) Director of Admissions and Student Affairs, 

Babcock Graduate School of Management 
B.A., University of New Hampshire, M.B.A., Columbia. 

Richard L. Zuber (1962) Associate Professor of History 

B.S., Appalachian; M.A., Emory; Ph.D., Duke. 



231 



PART-TIME STAFF MEMBERS 



Mrs. Marjorie S. Angell (1972) Instructor in Violin 

B.M., Louisville. 

Alfred T. Brauer (1965) Visting Professor of Mathematics 

Ph.D., Berlin. 

Ralph Causby (1974) Instructor in Speech Communication 

and Theatre Arts 
A.B., Lenoir Rhyne College, 1957; M.S., University of Tennessee, 1963. 

John S. Compere (1972) Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Mississippi College; B.D., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary; M.A., 
Wake Forest; Ph.D., North Carolina. 

Wellington Dunford (1973) Lecturer in Accounting 

B.A., Wake Forest. 

Mrs. Marjorie Felmet (1964) Visiting Teacher of Piano 

A.B., North Carolina; M.A., Eastman School of Music. 

Mrs. Caroline S. Fullerton (1969) Instructor in Speech 

Communication and Theatre Arts 

B.A., Rollins; M.A., Texas Christian. 

Beena B. Gokhale (1972) Instructor in Hindi 

B.A., B.T., M.Ed., Ph.D., Bombay. 

Mrs. Lucille S. Harris (1957) Instructor in Piano 

B.A., B.M., Meredith. 

Ludmilla Jasenovic (1973) Visting Lecturer in Russian 

B.A.U. of Belgrade; M.A., Ph.D., University of Montreal. 

Andrew D. Lester ( 1972) Visiting Lecturer in Religion 

B.A., Mississippi College; B.D., Th.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Mrs. Betty Jo May (1972) Instructor in Speech Communication 

and Theatre Arts 
B.S., University of Virginia; M.A., University of North Carolina Greensboro. 

Mrs. Blanche C. Speer (1972) Lecturer in Linguistics 

B.A., Howard Payne; M.A., Ph.D., Colorado. 

Mrs. Roberta Vest (1971) Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., East Tennessee State. 

Sadie Elizabeth Welch Visiting Lecturer in Education 

B.A., Greensboro; M.A., Duke; Ph.D., North Carolina. 

Mrs. O'Hara B. Wilkiemeyer (1971) Instructor in Art History 

B.A., Duke; M.A., Johns Hopkins. 

Mrs. Stacy Williams (1971) Instructor in Physical Education 

B.F.A., North Carolina School of the Arts. 

Mrs. Donna B. Woodmansee (1971) Counselor in the Center for 

Psychological Services 

B.A., Denver; M.A.Ed., Wake Forest. 



232 



STAFFS OF THE LIBRARIES 



Merrill G. Berthrong, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Director of Libraries 

Richard J. Murdoch, B.A., M.S. in L.S., Assistant to the Director and 
Curator of Rare Books. 

The Z. Smith Reynolds Library 
(General Library) 

Carlton P. West, A.B., A.M., B.S. in L.S., Librarian 

Mrs. Anne M. Nicholson, A.B., B.S. in L.S., Technical Services 
Librarian 

Minnie S. Kallam, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Reference Librarian 

Mrs. Dorothy M. Rowley, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Periodicals Librarian 

James M. Nicholson, M.A., M.S. in L.S., Circulation Librarian 

William K. Ach, A.B., B.S. in L.S., Microtext Librarian 

Michael J. LaCroix, A.B., M.S. in L.S., Acquisitions Librarian 

Minnie M. Huggins, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Documents Librarian 

Mrs. Margaret V. Shoemaker, B.S., A.B. in L.S., Assistant Catalog 
Librarian 

Mrs. Deborah E. Luck, B.S. in L.S., M.S. in L.S., Assistant Catalog 
Librarian 

John R. Woodard, Jr., B.A., Director of the Ethel Taylor Crittenden 
Collection in Baptist History 

Library of the School of Law 

Mrs. Vivian L. Wilson, A.B., B.S. in L.S., Librarian 
Mrs. Sallie Howard, M.S. in L.S., Cataloger 

Bowman Gray School of Medicine 
Main Library and Allied Health Library 

Michael D. Sprinkle, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Librarian 

Mrs. Soo Lee, B.A., M.S. in L.S., Chief, Technical Services 

Mrs. Suzanne Pickett, M.L.S., Cataloger 

Babcock Graduate School of Management 
Mrs. Jean B. Hopson, B.S., M.A. in L.S., Librarian 



233 



COACHING STAFF 



G. Eugene Hooks (1956) Director of Athletics 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.Ed., North Carolina; Ed.D., George Peabody. 

Jessie I. Haddock (1954) Associate Director of Athletics and Golf Coach 

B.S., Wake Forest. 



CarlTacy (1972) 

B.S., Davis & Elkins; M.S., Radford. 

Larry Williams (1972) 

A.B., Glenville State. 

Bobby Watson (1973) 

M.A., Xavier University. 

Harold C. Rhea (1968) 

B.S., Midland Lutheran; M.A., Ed.D., 

Leo Ellison, Jr. (1957) 

B.S., M.S., Northwestern State College. 

William Beattie Feathers (1961) 

B.S., Tennessee. 

James H. Leighton, Jr. (1962) 

A.B., Presbyterian College. 

Robert T. Bartholomew (1969) 

B.A., Wake Forest. 



Head Basketball Coach 

Assistant Basketball Coach 

Assistant Basketball Coach 

Cross Country and Track Coach; 
Instructor in Physical Education 

Colorado State. 

Swimming Coach; Instructor in 
Physical Education 

Baseball Coach; 
Assistant Football Coach 

Tennis Coach 

Director of Deacon Club 



Lewis Martin (1958) 
David Tinga (1973) 



Chuck Mills (1973) 

B.S., Illinois State; M.A., California State 

Jesse Cone (1973) 

M.A., Stanford. 

Steve Bernstein (1973) 

M.A., Utah State. 

Harry Elliott (1973) 

B.A., Syracuse. 

Mike Ellison (1973) 

M.A., Utah State. 

Garth Hall (1973) 

M.S., Utah State. 

William Hayes (1973) 

B.S., N. C. Central. 

Gene McKeehan (1973) 

M.A., Utah State. 

Paul Wargo (1973) 

M.A., Utah State. 

Cuff Yoshida (1973) 

B.S., California State Polytechnic. 

Zeno Martin, Jr. (1973) 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.S., Purdue. 



Trainer 
Supervisor of Athletic Equipment and Facilities 

Head Football Coach 



Assistant Football Coach 
Assistant Football Coach 
Assistant Football Coach 
Assistant Football Coach 
Assistant Football Coach 
Assistant Football Coach 
Assistant Football Coach 
Assistant Football Coach 
Assistant Football Coach 
Business Manager 



234 



THE BOWMAN GRAY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 
* PROFESSORS EMERITI 



Fred K. Garvey (1941-1969) Professor Emeritus of Urology 

M.D., University of Cincinnati School of Medicine. 

LuciLE W. Hutaff (1948) Professor Emeritus of Community Medicine, 

Assistant Professor Emeritus of Medicine 

B.S., Wisconsin; M.D., Rochester. 

Robert L. McMillan (1941-1971) Professor Emeritus 

of Clinical Medicine 
B.S., M.D., Duke. 

William H. Sprunt, Jr. (1941-1963) Professor Emeritus 

of Clinical Surgery 

B.S., Davidson; M.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Roscoe L. Wall (1942-1956) Professor Emeritus 

of Anesthesia 

B.S., Wake Forest, M.D., Jefferson Medical College. 



* Dates following names indicate period of service. 



235 



ALLIED HEALTH 

Leland E. Powers (1968) Professor of Community Medicine 

Director of Division of Allied Health 
M.D., Iowa; M.S.P.H., Michigan. 

Katherine H. Anderson (1969) Associate Professor 

Associate Medical Director of Physician Assistant Program 
B.S., Carnegie; M.D., Cornell. 

Richard Beckham (1972) Instructor 

B.S., M.Ed., University of Florida. 

Paul E. Benoit (1972) Associate Professor 

B.S., M.S., Saint Louis University; Ph.D., Missouri. 

David Booth (1973) Instructor 

B.A., University of Missouri; P. A., Bowman Gray. 

Patricia Dane Hale Breedin (1969) Instructor 

J. Edward Holl (1973) Assistant Professor 

B.S., M.S., University of Georgia; Ph.D., Medical University of South Carolina. 

Julian F. Keith (1972) Clinical Instructor 

M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Chauncey M. Lane, Jr. (1969) Instructor 

A.B., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; M.A., Appalachian State University. 

Jack L. Mason (1973) Assistant Professor 

Assistant Director of Evaluation for Physician Assistant Program 
B.S., Mansfield State College; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., Syracuse 
University. 

Phyllis Draper Newport (1969) Assistant Professor 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan; M.Sc, Oklahoma. 

Pamela Ogburn (1972) Assistant Instructor 

A.G.S., A.S., Daytona Beach Junior College. 

Jimmie L. Pharris (1971) Associate Professor 

Director of Evaluation for Physician Assistant Program 
B.S., Rhode Island State; M.S., Eastern New Mexico; Ph.D., Connecticut. 

Clyde F. Ritchie, Jr. (1971) Instructor and Assistant 

Director of the Program in Radiologic Technology 
B . S . , Alderson-Broaddus . 

Helen Pauline Vos (1969) Assistant Professor 

B.S., Calvin. 

Hal T. Wilson (1971) Associate Professor 

Associate in Community Medicine 
Associate in Medicine 
Medical Director of Physician Assistant Program 
A.B., Michigan; M.D., Michigan Medical School. 

James R. Winning (1972) Lecturer 

B.S., Clemson; M.A., East Tennessee. 



236 



FACULTY 
THE BOWMAN GRAY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

INSTRUCTION* 

James C. Abell (1973) Clinical Instructor in Pediatrics 

A.B., M.D., North Carolina. 

Jean Dofflemoyer Acton (1964) Associate Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Virginia. l 

Carlton N. Adams (1967) .. Clinical Associate Professor of 

* Obstetrics and Gynecology 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Duke. 

Richard M. Aderhold (1971) Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry 

M.D., North Carolina. 

Eben Alexander, Jr. (1949) Professor of Neurosurgery 

A.B., North Carolina; M.D., Harvard. 

Elms L. Allen (1973) Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Harvey H. Allen (1970) Clinical Instructor in Surgery 

B.A., Lincoln; M.D., Meharry. 

Katherine H. Anderson (1969) Associate Professor of Pediatrics 

B.S., Carnegie; M.D., Cornell. 

Stephen G. Anderson (1970) Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

and Gynecology 
M.D., Emory. 

John R. Ausband (1952) Professor of Otolaryngology 

B.A., Asbury; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

E. Reid Bahnson (1957) Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine 

A.B., North Carolina; M.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Khosrow Bahrani (1972) Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry 

M.D., Tehran University. 

Ralph W. Barnes (1969) Research Assistant Professor of Neurology 

B.S.E.E., Duke; M.S.E., Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Duke. 

Harold B. Bates (1970) Clinical Instructor in Urology 

A.B., Mercer; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Edward S. Beason (1972) Instructor in Surgery (Plastic Surgery) 

BA., Vanderbilt; M.D., Alabama. 

David L. Beavers (1955) Assistant Professor of Dental Surgery 

B.S., Wake Forest; D.D.S., Northwestern. 

Daniel R. Beerman (1973) Instructor in Pediatrics (Social Work) 

B.A., St. Andrews; M.Div., Princeton; M.S.W., Rutgers University. 

Jerry Lee Bennett (1970) Clinical Instructor in Pediatrics 

B.S., North Carolina State; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

David Merrill Biddulph (1970) Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

B.S., Utah; M.S., Ph.D., Illinois. 

Alexander A. Birch (1972) Assistant Professor of Anesthesia 

B.S., M.D., University of Michigan. 

Ignacio Bird (1965) Clinical Instructor in Radiology 

A.B., Cornell; M.D., Yale. 



* Names are arranged alphabetically. Date following names indicates year of appoint- 
ment. More than one date indicates separate appointments. 

237 



Faculty 



Thomas L. Blair (1945) 



B.S., D.D.S., M.S. 



Clinical Assistant Professor of Periodontia 
and Dental Surgery 

University of Pittsburgh. 



Professor of Radiology 



Damon D. Blake (1956) 

B.S., Washington; M.D., Columbia. 

Delmar E. Bland (1969) Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Frederick A. Blount, Jr. (1954) Clinical Assistant Professor of 

Pediatrics 
A.B., North Carolina; M.D., University of Pennsylvania. 



Walter J. Bo (1960) 

B.S., M.S., Marquette; Ph.D., Cincinnati. 



Professor of Anatomy 



Vernard F. Bond, Jr. (1963) Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine 

A.B., George Washington; M.D., Johns Hopkins. Associate in Physiology 

Richard B. Boren, III (1971) Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry 

M.D., Duke. 



Edwyn T. Bowen, Jr. (1964) 

B.S., Davidson; M.D., Emory. 

William H. Boyce (1952) 

B.S., Davidson; M.D., Vanderbilt. 

George E. Bradford (1950) 

M.D., University of Tennessee. 

Ralph W. Brauer (1966) 

A.B., Columbia; M.Sc, Ph.D., Rochester. 

Robert S. Brice, Jr. (1969) 

A.B., M.D., Duke. 

Vardaman M. Buckalew, Jr. (1973) 



Clinical Assistant Professor of 
Pediatrics 

Professor of Urology 

Clinical Assistant Professor of 
Otolaryngology 

Associate in Biochemistry 
Associate in Physiology 

Clinical Instructor in Medicine 



A.B., North Carolina; M.D., University of Pennsylvania. 



Professor of Medicine 
and Physiology 



Billy C. Bullock (1965) Associate Professor of Comparative Medicine 

D.V.M., Texas A & M. 

Richard L. Burt (1949) Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

B.S., Springfield; M.S., Ph.D., Brown; M.D., Harvard. 



Kenneth P. Carlson (1970) 

B.A., M.D., Emory. 

John L. Carter (1972) 

B.S., M.D., Howard University. 

Philips J. Carter, Jr. (1973) 

B.S., M.D., Tulane. 

David Cayer (1945) 

B.A., M.D., Duke. 

Robert T. Chambers (1970) 

B.A., M.D., Duke. 

Sheng H. Chang (1973) 

Ph.D., University of Alabama; M.D. 

Yi-Chi Chang (1969) 



B.S., Southeast Missouri; Ph.D., Connecticut. 



Clinical Instructor in Urology 

Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry 

Clinical Instructor in Orthopaedic 
Surgery 

Clinical Professor of Medicine 

Clinical Instructor in Pediatrics 

Assistant Professor of Pathology 
National Taiwan University. 

Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 



Donald K. Chapman (1973) 

B.S., North Carolina. 

Jesse P. Chapman, Jr. (1973) 

A.B., Alabama; M.D., Pennsylvania. 



Lecturer in Pharmacology 
Clinical Assistant Professor of Surgery 



238 



Faculty 

James A. Chappell (1972) Associate Professor of Community Medicine, 
A.B., Vanderbilt; M.D., Bowman Gray. Associate in Pediatrics 

Robert E. Chase (1973) Clinical Assistant Professor of Anesthesia 

B.S., M.S., M.D., Marquette. 

Peggy Chou (1972) Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry 

M.D., Faculty of Medicine, Mandalay, Burma. 

R. Perry Clark (1972) Clinical Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

A.B., Princeton; M.D., Kentucky. 

Thomas E. Clark (1971) Assistant Professor of Sociology 

(Community Medicine) 

B.A., Mississippi College; B.D., New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary; M.S., 
Florida State; Ph.D., Florida State. 

Thomas L. Clark (1970) Clinical Instructor in Obstetrics and 

Gynecology 

M.D., Meharry. 

Thomas B. Clarkson, Jr. (1957) Professor of Comparative Medicine 

D.V.M., Georgia. 

Carl M. Cochrane (1967) Professor of Psychology (Psychiatry) 

B.A., Guilford; Ph.D., North Carolina. 

W. Stuart Collins (1973) Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry 

B.S., Davidson; M.D., Duke. 

Paul B. Comer (1973) Assistant Professor of Anesthesia 

B.A., Arizona; M.D., Baylor. 

John S. Compere (1973) Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry 

A.B., Mississippi; B.D., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary; M.A., Wake 
Forest; Ph.D., North Carolina. 

Elizabeth Conrad (1954) Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatrics 

A.B., Duke; M.D., Johns Hopkins. 

M. Robert Cooper (1967) Associate Professor of Medicine 

B.S., North Carolina State; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

A. Robert Cord-ell (1957) Professor of Surgery 

Associate in Physiology 

B.S., North Carolina; M.D., Johns Hopkins. 

Maurice Couturier (1967) Clinical Assistant Professor of Obstetrics 

and Gynecology 

M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Robert J. Cowan (1970) Assistant Professor of Radiology 

A.B., M.D., North Carolina. 

Robert W. Cowgill (1962) Professor of Biochemistry 

B.A., Kansas; M.S., Rensselaer; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins. 

Hylton K. Crotts (1951) Clinical Instructor in Dental Surgery 

D.D.S., University of Pennsylvania. 

James E. Crowe (1972) Instructor in Radiology 

B.S., Belmont College; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Andrew J. Crutchfield (1956) Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Virginia. 

Carol C. Cunningham (1970) Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Oklahoma State. 

Jerome J. Cunningham (1974) Assistant Professor of Radiology 

B.S., Florida; M.D., Florida. 

D. Patrick Currie (1973) Instructor in Urology 

B.S., Davidson College; M.D., Duke. 

Robert M. Dacus, III (1972) Clinical Instructor in Obstetrics 

and Gynecology 



B.S., Furman; M.D., Bowman Gray. 



239 



Faculty 

Ivan W. F. Davidson (1961) Professor of Pharmacology 

Associate in Physiology 

B.S., Manitoba; M.A., Ph.D., Toronto. 

Courtland H. Davis, Jr. (1952) Professor of Neurosurgery 

A.B., George Washington; M.D., Virginia. 

E. L. Davis (1971) Clinical Instructor in Medicine 

B.S., Morehouse; M.D., Howard. 

John P. Davis (1954) Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine 

A.B., Washington & Lee; M.D., Pennsylvania. 

Wayne E. Davis (1970) Clinical Instructor in Urology 

M.D., Duke. 

William H. Davis, Jr. (1959) Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

B.S., M.D., Duke. 

Lawrence R. Dechatelet (1969) Associate Professor of Biochemistry, 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Loyola. Research Associate in Medicine 

Ernesto E. De La Torre (1963) Clinical Instructor in Neurosurgery 

B.S., La Salle School; M.D., Havana Medical School. 

JOHN W. Denham (1972) Instructor in Community Medicine 

B.S., Davidson; M.D., Bowman Gray 

John H. Dtlworth (1973) Clinical Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery 

B.A., M.D., University of Virginia. 

Elia Dimitri (1970) Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

B.S., East Tennessee State; M.D., University of Tennessee. 

Robert Diseker (1972) Assistant Professor of Community Medicine 

A.B., South Carolina; Ph.D., M.S.P.H., UNC School of Public Health. 

Ann M. Dixon (1973) Instructor in Pathology 

M.B., Ch.B., University of Edinburgh. 

Robert L. Dixon (1970) Assistant Professor of Radiology (Physics) 

B.S., Ph.D., South Carolina. 

Henry Drexler (1964) Associate Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Pennsylvania State; Ph.D., Rochester. 

Presley Z. Dunn (1968) Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

B.S., M.D., North Carolina. 

Ira Gordon Early (1966) Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine 

M.D., Bowman Gray. 

James F. Earnhardt (1969) Clinical Instructor in Pediatrics 

B.S., Davidson; M.D., North Carolina. 

John H. Edmonds, Jr. (1970) Professor of Medicine 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Kenneth E. Ekstrand (1973) Instructor in Radiology 

Ph.D., Cornell University. (Radiologic Physics) 

Louise C. Eskridge (1973) Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry 

M.D., Bowman Gray; B.S., North Carolina State. 

William S. Farabow (1972) Clinical Instructor in Obstetrics 

and Gynecology 

M.D., Emory. 

John C. Faris (1973) Clinical Instructor in Radiology 

A.B., Duke; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

John H. Felts (1955) Professor of Medicine 

B.S., Wofford; M.D., Medical College of South Carolina. 

Robert A. Finch (1970) Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

A.B., Oberlin; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve. 

240 



Faculty 

James A. Finger (1967) Lecturer in Community Medicine 

(Public Health) 

B.S., South Carolina; M.D., Medical College of South Carolina; M.P.H., North 
Carolina. 

H. Francis Forsyth (1946) Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

A.B., M.D., Michigan. 

J. H. Smith Foushee, Jr. (1971) Clinical Associate Professor of 

Obstetrics and Gynecology (Pathology) 
M.D., Jefferson. 

DAVID H. Fuller, Jr. (1972) Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 
B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray; M.P.H., North Carolina. 

James C. Gaither (1970) Clinical Instructor in Medicine 

B.S., Davidson; M.D., Washington University. 

Paul Geniec (1971) Clinical Instructor in Otolaryngology 

B.S., Arizona; M.D., Utah. 

Nitya R. Ghatak (1974) Associate Professor of Pathology 

M.D., University of Calcutta. 

Robert L. Gibson (1971) Assistant Professor of Anesthesia 

B.S., Richmond; M.D., Medical College of Virginia. 

Robert W. Gibson, Jr. (1972) Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry 

A.B., North Carolina; M.D., Bowman Gray. 
Frederick W. Glass (1973) Assistant Professor of Emergency Services 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Richard R. Glenn (1962) Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Albert P. Glod (1953) Clinical Instructor in Surgery 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Thomas R. Gnau (1972) Instructor in Radiology (Radiopharmacy ) 

B.S., Ohio State; M.S., North Carolina. 

Richard J. Godfrey (1973) Instructor in Psychiatry 

B.A., Atlantic Christian College; M.S.W., North Carolina. 

Harold O. Goodman (1958) Professor of Medical Genetics (Pediatrics) 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Minnesota. 

Joseph G. Gordon (1968) Associate Professor of Radiology 

M.D., Meharry. 

Louis Gottlieb (1968) Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology 

B.S., Brooklyn College of Pharmacy; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Willis J. Grant, III (1971) Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry 

A.B., North Carolina; M.D., North Carolina. 

John H. Gray (1968) Clinical Instructor in Medicine 

B.S., Davidson; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Harold D. Green (1945) Gordon Gray Professor of Physiology 

Associate in Pharmacology 
B.S., D.Sc, Wooster; M.D., Western Reserve. Associate in Medicine 

Francis W. Green (1964) Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine 

A.B., M.D., North Carolina. 

Frank C. Greiss, Jr. (1960) Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

A.B., M.D., Pennsylvania. 

Albert O. Griffin (1970) Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Mary I. Griffith (1967) Clinical Associate Professor of 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 

M.D., University of Tennessee. 

Anthony G. Gristina (1971) Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

B.A., New York University; M.D., Albany Medical College. 

241 



Faculty 

David L. Groves (1969) Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Marietta; M.S., Ph.D., Wisconsin. 

Marcus M. Gttlley (1959) Associate Professor of Psychiatry 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Charles G. Gttnn, Jr. (1961) Lecturer in Industrial Medicine 

B.S., M.D., Duke. 

John P. Gusdon, Jr. (1967) Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

B.A., M.D., Virginia. an d Gynecology; Associate in Microbiology 

Paul Gwyn (1970) Clinical Instructor in Surgery (Plastic Surgery) 

A.B., Princeton; M.D., Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

TAMARA Hahn (1972) Instructor in Pediatrics 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina at Greensboro. 

Richard E. Hall (1973) Instructor in Physiology 

A.B., Indiana; Ph.D., University of California. 

C. Allen Haney (1968) Associate Professor of Sociology (Pediatrics) 

B.S., Jacksonville; M.S., Ph.D., Florida State. 

James A. Harrill (1941) Professor of Otolaryngology 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Pennsylvania. 

Lloyd H. Harrison (1971) Assistant Professor of Urology 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Donald C. Hartzog (1969) Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine 

B.S., Salem; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Donald M. Hayes (1959) Professor of Community Medicine 

Associate Professor of Medicine 
B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Mary Ann Hayes (1972) Instructor in Pediatrics 

A.B., A.M., Michigan. 

Robert N. Headley (1963) Associate Professor of Medicine 

B.S., M.D., Maryland. 

Leo J. Heaphy, Jr. (1965) Associate Professor of Medicine 

Associate in Phvsiology 

A.B., Canisius; M.D., Buffalo. 

Joseph R. Hedgpeth (1973) Clinical Instructor in Obstetrics and 

Gynecology 
A.B., Duke; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Clara M. Heise (1972) Assistant Professor of Radiology 

(Biochemistry) 
B.S., Brooklyn College; Ph.D., State University of Iowa. 

Eugene R. Heise (1969) Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

Associate in Surgery 
B.S., Wittenberg; M.S., Iowa; Ph.D., Wake Forest. 

Belmont A. Helsabeck (1970) Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology 

M.D., Medical College of Virginia. 

C. NASH Herndon (1942) Professor of Medical Genetics (Pediatrics) 

Associate in Medicine 
Associate Dean for Research Development 
A.B., Duke; M.D., Jefferson. 
(See Administration) 

Felda Hightower (1944) Professor of Surgery 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Pennsylvania. 

A. Theodore Hill (1968) Clinical Instructor in Medicine 

B.S., Miami; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Alanson Hinman (1952) Associate Professor of Pediatrics 

A.B., Stanford; M.D., Johns Hopkins. 

242 



Faculty 

Ivan L. Holleman, Jr. (1960) Associate Professor of Pathology 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

George W. Holmes (1951) Clinical Assistant Professor of 

Orthopaedic Surgery 
A.B., Duke; M.D., Medical College of Virginia. 

Charles M. Howell, Jr. (1954) Professor of Medicine (Dermatology 

and Allergy); Associate in Pathology 
B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Pennsylvania.. 

Julius A. Howell (1957) Professor of Surgery (Plastic Surgery); 

Lecturer in Medical Jurisprudence 
LL.B., B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Pennsylvania. 

A. Sherrill Hudspeth (1963) Associate Professor of Surgery 

M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Frank H. Hulcher (1958) Associate Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic. 

CAROLYN C. Httntley (1957) Professor of Pediatrics 

A.B., Mount Holyoke; M.D., Duke. 

Benjamin F. Huntley (1967) Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine 

M.D., Harvard. 

Phillip M. Hutchins (1970) Assistant Professor of Physiology 

(Biomedical Engineering) 
B.S., North Carolina State; M.S., Ph.D., Wake Forest. 

H. Samuel Imamura (1970) Clinical Instructor in Medicine 

B.A., Seinan Gakuin University; B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Thomas H. Irving (1967) Professor of Anesthesia 

Associate in Pharmacology 
B.A., Pennsylvania; M.D., Hahnemann. 

Harold N. Jacklin (1969) Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology 

B.S., Muskingum; M.D., State University of New York. 

Fabian B. Jackson (1973) Instructor in Physiology 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.S., Emory; Ph.D., Bowman Gray. 

Francis M. James, III (1968) Associate Professor of Anesthesia 

B.S., Swarthmore; M.D., Hahnemann. 

George W. James (1958) Clinical Associate Professor of Dermatology 

B.S., M.D., Tennessee. 

PAUL M. James, Jr. (1970) Associate Professor of Surgery 

A.B., Swarthmore; M.D., Hahnemann. 

Richard Janeway ( 1966) Professor of Neurology and Dean 

B.A., Colgate; M.D., Pennsylvania. 
(See Administration) 

Azmi S. Jarrah (1971) Clinical Instructor in Pediatrics 

B.S., M.D., American University of Beirut. 

Howard A. Jemison, Jr. (1970) Clinical Instructor in Community 

Medicine (Student Health) 
B.A., Ohio Wesley an; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Royal G. Jennings (1970) Clinical Instructor in Dermatology 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Henry W. Johnson (1961) Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Joseph E. Johnson (1972) Professor of Medicine 

B.A., Vanderbilt; M.D., Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. 

Frank R. Johnston (1950) Professor of Surgery 

B.S., Presbyterian; M.D., Duke. 

Don Carl Jones (1972) Instructor in Pathology (Biochemistry) 

B.S., Tufts University; Ph.D., Bowman Gray. 

243 



Faculty 

Zelma A. Kalnins (1956) Associate Professor of Clinical Cytology 

M.D., University of Latvia. 

C. Hege Kapp (1964) Clinical Instructor in Medicine 

B.S., North Carolina; CM., M.D., McGill. 

John S. Kaufmann (1962, 1970) Assistant Professor of Medicine 

and Pharmacology 
B.S., Ph.D., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Paul R. Kearns (1967) Clinical Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

David L. Kelly, Jr. (1965) Associate Professor of Neurosurgery 

M.D., North Carolina. 

Weston M. Kelsey (1946) Professor of Pediatrics 

B.S., Hamilton; M.D., Johns Hopkins. 

Charles L. Kennedy (1970) Clinical Instructor in Pediatrics 

B.S., Johnson C. Smith; M.D., Meharry. 

Robert M. Kerr (1966) Associate Professor of Medicine 

B.S., Bucknell; M.D., Cornell. 

Bok Soo Kim (1969) Assistant Professor of Pathology 

M.D., M.S., Yonsei University, Korea. 

Arnold S. Kreger (1971) Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Brooklyn College of Pharmacy; M.S., Michigan; Ph.D., Michigan. 

Frederick W. Kremkau (1971) Research Instructor in Medicine 

Research Associate in Neurology 
B.E.E., Cornell; M.S., Ph.D., University of Rochester. 

Claire M. Kretschmann Instructor in Neurology (Stroke 

Epidemiology) 
B.A., University of Kansas. 

Wayne A. Krueger (1970) Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

B.S., M.S., John Carroll; Ph.D., Illinois. 

Louis S. Kucera (1970) Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

B.A., St. John's; M.S., Creighton; Ph.D., Missouri. 

William A. Lambeth, Jr. (1958) Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine 

M.D., Duke. 

Ralph R. Landes (1953) Lecturer in the History of Medicine 

B.S., Wisconsin; M.S., M.D., Chicago. 

Eva S. Leake (1963) Research Associate Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Universidad Autonoma de Mexico; M.S., Institute Politecnico, Mexico, D.F. 

Norman H. Leake (1972) Adjunct Associate Professor of 

Pharmacology 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Virginia. 

Noel D. M. Lehner (1966) Associate Professor of Comparative 

B.S., D.V.M., Illinois. Medicine 

Laurence B. Leinbach (1957) Associate Professor of Radiology 

A.B., North Carolina; M.D., Harvard. 

Melvin Levitt (1970) Associate Professor of Physiology 

B.S., M. A.,, Roosevelt; Ph.D., Michigan State. 

Edward M. Lieberman (1968) Associate Professor of Physiology 

B.S., Tufts; M.A., Massachusetts; Ph.D., Florida. 

Eugene B. Linton (1969) Clinical Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

and Gynecology 

B.S., Davidson; M.D., Medical College of Virginia. 

J. Maxwell Little (1941) Professor of Pharmacology 

Associate in Physiology 

B.A., M.S., Emory; Ph.D., Vanderbilt. 

244 



Faculty 

Hugh B. LOFLAND, Jr. (1952) Professor of Pathology (Biochemistry) 

Associate in Biochemistry 
B.S., M.S., Texas A & M; Ph.D., Purdue. 

Paul D. Long (1973) Clinical Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery 

M.D., University of Michigan Medical School. 

Samuel H. Love (1955) Associate Professor of Microbiology 

B.A., Virginia; M.S., Miami, Ohio; Ph.D., Pennsylvania. 

George C. Lynch (1954) Professor of Audio Visual Resources 

Arthur S. Lynn (1970) Clinical Instructor in Medicine 

B.S., Davidson; M.D., North Carolina. 

David R. Mace (1967) Professor of Family Sociology 

(Community Medicine) 
B.S., London; B.A., M.A., Cambridge; Ph.D., Manchester. 

Rembert H. Malloy (1970) Clinical Instructor in Surgery 

B.S., Johnson C. Smith; M.D., Howard. 

*Gerry Martin (1971) Instructor in Ophthalmology 

B.A., Pfeiffer; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

James F. Martin (1950) Professor of Radiology 

A.B., Marietta; M.D., Western Reserve. 

Edwin H. Martinat (1971) Clinical Associate Professor of 

Orthopaedic Surgery 
M.D., Bowman Gray. 

James D. Mattox, Jr. (1973) Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

JAMES A. Maultsby (1973) Clinical Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery 
B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

W. JOSEPH May (1962) Associate Professor of Obstetrics and 

Gynecology 
B.A., High Point; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

C. DOUGLAS Maynard (1966) Associate Professor of Radiology 

Associate in Neurology, and Associate Dean 
B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 
(See Administration) 

David R. Maynard (1972) Clinical Assistant Professor of Anesthesia 

B.S., Davidson; M.D., Duke. 
Kenneth F. McCain (1968) Clinical Instructor in Pediatrics (Allergy) 

B.S., M.D., North Carolina. 

Charles E. McCall (1968) Associate Professor of Medicine 

Associate in Pharmacology 
B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

William McCall, Jr. (1965) Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine 

M.D., Duke. 

JAMES G. McCormick (1970) Research Associate Professor of 

Otolaryngology (Experimental Psychology) 
B.S., Bucknell; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton. 

Charles E. McCreight (1954) Associate Professor of Anatomy 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., George Washington. 

Charles P. McGraw (1973) Research Assistant Professor of Neurology 
Associate in Neurosurgery, and Associate in Physiology 
B.S., Belmont Abbey; M.S., East Texas State University; Ph.D., Texas A & M. 

Lawrence McHenry (1972) Professor of Neurology 

B.A., Pomona College; M.D., University of Oklahoma, School of Medicine. 



Military Leave. 

245 



Faculty 

William M. McKinney (1963) Associate Professor of Neurology 

Research Associate in Radiology 
B.A., North Carolina; M.D., Virginia. 

Robert C. McKone (1961) Associate Professor of Pediatrics 

B.S., North Dakota; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Ross L. McLean (1971) Professor of Medicine 

B.S., Bowdoin College; M.D., Johns Hopkins. 

William T. McLean, Jr. (1966) Associate Professor of Neurology 

Associate in Pediatrics 
B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

James T. McRae (1972) Assistant Professor of Emergency Services 

B.M., 'Mississippi College; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Manson Meads (1947^ Professor of Medicine and Vice President 

for Medical Affairs 

A.B., University of California; M.D., Temple; D.Sc, Temple. 
(See Administration) 

Robert L. Means (1970) Clinical Instructor in Surgery 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Jesse H. Meredith (1958) Professor of Surgery 

A.B., Elon; M.D., Western Reserve. 

Isadore Meschan (1955) Professor of Radiology 

B.A., M.A., M.D., Western Reserve. 

Rachel F. Meschan (1971) Clinical Assistant Professor of Obstetrics 

and Gynecology; Research Associate in Radiology 
M.B., B.S., University of Melbourne; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Virgil M. Messer (1973) Clinical Instructor in Medicine 

M.D., Bowman Gray. 

David D. Meyer (1973) Clinical Instructor in Neurology 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Robert L. Michielutte (1970) Research Associate Professor 

of Sociology (Medicine) 

B.A., Knox; M.S., Ph.D., Florida State. 

Alma E. Miller (1972) Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry 

B.S., Le Moyne; M.D., Meharry. 

Emery C. Miller, Jr. (1955) Professor of Medicine 

Associate in Physiology and Associate Dean 

A.B., North Carolina; M.D., Johns Hopkins. 
(See Administration) 

Henry S. Miller, Jr. (1960) Professor of Medicine 

Associate in Physiology 

M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Inglis J. Miller, Jr. (1971) Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

B.S., Ohio State; Ph.D., Florida State. 

Grover R. Mims, III (1973) Assistant Professor of Anesthesia 

B.S., Carson-Newman; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

John H. Monroe (1970) Clinical Associate Professor of 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 

B.S., North Carolina; M.D., Harvard. 

William G. Montgomery (1971) Clinical Associate Professor of Urology 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Dixon M. Moody (1973) Assistant Professor of Radiology 

(Ne u ro radiology) 
M.D., University of Texas, Southwestern Medical School. 

John A. Moore (1970) Lecturer in Comparative Medicine 

B.S., D.V.M., M.S., Michigan State. 

246 



Faculty 

Lathan T. Moose (1970) Clinical Instructor in Urology 

B.S., North Carolina State; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Robert P. Morehead (1941) Clinical Professor of Pathology 

B.S., M.A., B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Jefferson. 

Lemuel Morrison (1973) Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

B.S., Auburn; M.D., Medical College of Alabama. 

John C. Mueller (1971) Clinical Instructor in Medicine 

A.B., Harvard; M.D., Tufts. 

Richard T. Myers (1950) Professor of Surgery 

A.B., North Carolina; M.D., Pennsylvania. 

Quentin N. Myrvik (1963) Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Washington. 

Clay H. Napper (1964) Clinical Instructor in Medicine 

A.B., Missouri; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Brooks E. Neff, Jr. (1968) Instructor in Otolaryngology 

B.A., M.S., Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 

David S. Nelson (1971) Clinical Instructor in Surgery 

B.S., Geneva; M.D., Bowman Gray. 
J. ISAAC Newton (1972) Clinical Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

B.S., M.D., North Carolina. 

John H. Nicholson (1968) Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine 

B.S., Citadel; M.D., Medical College of Virginia. 

Robert E. Nolan (1961) Clinical Instructor in Surgery 

B.S., Adelbert College of Western Reserve; M.D., Western Reserve. 

Abdel M. Nomeir (1973) Instructor in Neurology (Sonic Medicine) 

M.B., Ch.B., D.M., M.D., Faculty of Medicine, Egypt. 

Charles M. Norfleet, Jr. (1961) Clinical Associate Professor of 

Urology 

B.S., Davidson; M.D., Pennsylvania. 

Thomas M. Nosek (1973) Instructor in Physiology 

B.S., Notre Dame; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Joseph A. Noto (1971) Clinical Instructor in Surgery 

B.S., University of Scran ton; M.D., Pennsylvania. 

Thomas F. O'Brien, Jr. (1961) Associate Professor of Medicine 

B.A., Princeton; M.D., Yale. 

Ruth O'Neal (1969) Associate Professor of Pediatrics 

A.B., Transylvania; M.D., Medical College of Virginia; M.S., Minnesota. 

THOMAS F. Pajak (1972) Assistant Professor of Community Medicine 

B.A., A. A., Divine Word Seminary College; M.S., Depaul University; M.A., State 
University of New York at Buffalo; Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo. 

Peter E. Parker (1970) Clinical Instructor in Surgery 

B.A., Ohio Wesley an; M.D., Ohio State. 

Roger E. Parker (1972) Assistant Professor of Physiology and 

Pharmacology 

B.S., Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 

Charles E. Parkin (1967) Associate Professor of Anesthesia 

B.S., Memphis State; M.D., Tennessee. 

Betsy A. Parsley (1972) Clinical Instructor in Pediatrics 

B.A., Elon; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Richard B. Patterson (1961) Associate Professor of Pediatrics 

B.S., Davidson; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Larry A. Pearce (1969) Assistant Professor of Neurology 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. Associate in Pharmacology 

247 



Faculty 

William S. Pearson (1966) Associate Professor of Psychiatry 

Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 
B.S., M.D., North Carolina. 

Timothy C. Pennell (1966) Associate Professor of Surgery 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

D. Russell Perry, Jr. (1956) Clinical Assistant Professor of 

Pediatrics 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Darwin W. Peterson (1973) Assistant Professor of Physiology 

B.S., M.S., University of Nevada; Ph.D., University of Alabama School of Medicine. 

Tom A. Petty (1967) Clinical Assistant Professor of 

A.B., Austin; M.D., University of Arkansas. Obstetrics and Gynecology 

James R. Philp (1973) Associate Professor of Medicine 

M.B., Ch.B., B.Sc, M.R.C.P., M.D., Edinburgh. 

Louis Pikula (1971) Clinical Instructor in Surgery (Neurosurgery) 

B.S., John Carroll; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

William R. Pitser (1971) Clinical Instructor in Otolaryngology 

A.B., Davidson; M.D., North Carolina. 

John M. Pixley (1961) Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

B.A., Denison; M.D., Ohio State. 

George Podgorny (1971) Clinical Instructor in Surgery 

B.S., Maryville; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Frank E. Pollock (1963) Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic 

Surgery 
B.A., M.D., Ohio State. 

Joseph G. Poole (1972) Assistant Professor of Radiology 

(Neuroradiology) 

B.&., North Carolina State; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Thomas L. Presson (1973) Clinical Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery 

B.S., North Carolina; M.D., University of North Carolina School of Medicine. 

Robert W. Prichard (1951) Professor of Pathology 

M.D., George Washington. 

James T. Proctor (1973) Clinical Professor of Psychiatry 

(Child Psychiatry) 
B.A., M.D., University of Kansas. 

Richard C. Proctor (1950) Professor of Psychiatry 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Milton Raben (1970) Associate Professor of Radiology 

(Radiation Therapy) 

B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic; M.D., Tufts. 

Angus C. Randolph (1948) Professor of Psychiatry 

B.A., Princeton; M.D., Virginia. 

Carlos E. Rapela (1959) Professor of Physiology 

Associate in Pharmacology 

M.D., Faculty of Medical Sciences of the University of Buenos Aires. 

Charles N. Remy (1962) Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S., Syracuse; Ph.D., New York Upstate Medical Center. 

A. Leonard Rhyne (1964) Associate Professor of Biostatistics 

(Community Medicine) 
B.A., North Carolina; Ph.D., North Carolina State. 

Frederick Richards, II (1970) Assistant Professor of Medicine 

B.S., Davidson; M.D., South Carolina. 

Stephen H. Richardson (1963) Professor of Microbiology 

B.A., California; M.S., Ph.D., Southern California. 

248 



Faculty 

R. Winston Roberts (1947) Professor of Ophthalmology 

M.D., Duke. 

Jack M. Rogers (1970) Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

B.S., Alabama; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Bryant H. Roisum (1972) Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry 

B.S., M.D., Wisconsin. 

Walter M. Roufail (1970) Clinical Instructor in Medicine 

M.D., Cairo University. 
George D. Rovere (1973) Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

B.A., Syracuse; M.D., State University of New York, College of Medicine at Syracuse. 

Lawrence L. Rudel (1973) Assistant Professor of Comparative Medicine 
B.S., Colorado; M.S., Ph.D., University of Arkansas Medical Center. 

Alfred J. Rtjfty, Jr. (1972) Assistant Professor of Medicine 

M.D., Louisiana State University School of Medicine. 

Richard W. St. Clair (1967) Associate Professor of Pathology 

(Physiology); Associate in Physiology 
B.S., Ph.D., Colorado State. 

Doris Y. Sanders (1966) Associate Professor of Pediatrics 

B.A., Austin Peay State; M.D., Vanderbilt. 

William M. Satterwhite (1970) Clinical Assistant Professor of 

Otolaryngology 
B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Duke. 

Robert T. Savage (1970) Assistant Professor of Anesthesia 

Associate in Community Medicine 
B.S., M.D., North Carolina. 

C. Glenn Sawyer (1952) Professor of Medicine 

M.D., Bowman Gray. 

William F. Sayers (1972) Clinical Instructor in Pediatrics 

A.B., M.D., North Carolina. 

Modesto Scharyj (1962) Associate Professor of Pathology 

B.A., Cracow; M.D., Vienna, Austria. 

Herman E. Schmid, Jr. (1960) Professor of Physiology 

Associate in Medicine 
B.S., M.S., M.D., Illinois. 

John L. Schultz (1972) Assistant Professor of Radiology 

B.A., North Carolina; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Frank B. Sellers (1972) Clinical Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery 

A.B., Erskine; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Louis DeS. Shaffner (1951) Professor of Surgery 

A.B., North Carolina; M.D., Harvard. 

ZAKARIYA K. Shihabi (1972) Assistant Professor of Pathology 

(Clinical Chemistry) 
B.S., Alexandria; M.S., Texas A & M; Ph.D., South Dakota. 

Thomas E. Simpson (1972) Clinical Instructor in Surgery 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Jerry E. Sipe (1969) Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S., Lenoir Rhyne; Ph.D., Wake Forest. 

N. Sheldon Skinner, Jr. (1972) Professor of Physiology 

Professor of Medicine 
B.S., Auburn University; M.D., Medical College of Alabama. 

M. Madison Slusher (1973) Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology 

B.A., Harvard; M.D., University of Kentucky School of Medicine. 

William A. Smithson (1973) Instructor in Pediatrics (Neonatology) 

B.A., North Carolina; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

249 



Faculty 

Leo B. Snow (1970) Clinical Assistant Professor of Radiology 

M.D., Temple. 

M. Frank Sohmer, Jr. (1956) Clinical Instructor in Medicine 

M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Jack B. Spainhour, Jr. (1973) Clinical Instructor in Medicine 

(Gastroenterology) 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Richard L. Spencer (1970) Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry 

B.S., Belmont Abbey; M.D., Medical College of Virginia. 

William J. Spencer (1967) Assistant Professor of Medicine 

M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Riley E. Spoon (1946) Clinical Instructor in Dental Surgery 

B.S., Wake Forest; D.D.S., Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. 

Edward V. Spudis (1965) Clinical Assistant Professor of Neurology 

B.S., M.D., Maryland; M.S., Minnesota. 

Charles L. Spurr (1957) Professor of Medicine 

B.S., Bucknell; M.S., M.D., Rochester. 

Charles C. Stamey (1962) Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

A.B., North Carolina; M.D., Harvard. 

John Allen Stanley (1967) Associate Professor of Ophthalmology 

A.B., Dartmouth; M.D., Harvard. 

Howard M. Starling (1951) Clinical Assistant Professor of Surgery 

M.D., Medical College of Virginia. 

Lloyd J. Story (1970) Clinical Instructor in Medicine 

B.A., East Tennessee State; M.D., Tennessee. 

Jack W. Strandhoy (1973) Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 

B.S., University of Illinois; M.S., Ph.D., University of Iowa. 

Llewellyn W. Stringer, Jr. (1972) Clinical Assistant Professor of 

Anesthesia 
M.D., Medical College of Virginia. 

Cornelius F. Strittmatter, IV (1961) Odus M. Mull Professor of 

Biochemistry 

B.S., Juniata; Ph.D., Harvard. 

Samuel A. Sue (1973) Clinical Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Norman M. Sulkin (1952) William Neal Reynolds Professor of 

Anatomy 
B.A., M.A., Alabama; Ph.D., Iowa. 

David Tate (1968) Clinical Instructor in Pediatrics 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Blucher E. Taylor (1968) Clinical Instructor in Obstetrics 

and Gynecology 
A.B., North Carolina; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Thomas B. Templeton (1969) Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine 

A.B., North Carolina; M.D., Jefferson. 

James J. Thomas (1964) Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

B.S., M.D., Illinois. 

Benjamin E. Thompson (1973) Clinical Instructor in Surgery 

(Dentistry — Prosthodon tics) 
A.B., North Carolina; D.D.S., M.S., University of North Carolina School of Dentistry. 

Helen L. Tinnin (1970) Adjunct Associate Professor of Community 

B.A., California (Berkeley); Ph.D., Ohio State. Medicine 

John D. Tolmie (1970) Assistant Professor of Anesthesia 

B.A., Hobart; M.D., McGill, Montreal. 

250 



Faculty 

James F. Toole (1962) Walter C. T eagle Professor of Neurology 

B.A., Princeton; M.D., Cornell; LL.B., La Salle. 

Parks DeW. Trivette (1954) Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatries 
B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

B. Lionel Truscott (1968) Professor of Neurology 

B.A., Drew; M.A., Syracuse; M.S., Ph.D., M.D., Yale. 

Henry C. Turner (1967) Assistant Professor of Anesthesia 

A.B., M.D., North Carolina. 

Robert A. Turner, Jr. (1971) Assistant Professor of Medicine 

Associate in Rehabilitation Medicine 
A.B., North Carolina; M.D., Medical College of Alabama. 

Kenneth V. Tyner (1970) Clinical Instructor in Surgery 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Temple. 

Robert G. Underdal (1970) Clinical Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery 
B.A., Concordia College; B.S., North Dakota; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Henry L. Valk (1950) Professor of Medicine 

A.B., North Carolina; M.D., Duke. 

Clark E. Vincent (1964) Professor of Sociology 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D., California (Berkeley). (Obstetrics and Gynecology) 

William D. Wagner (1972) Assistant Professor of Comparative 

Medicine 
B.S., Geneva College; M.S., Ph.D., West Virginia University. 

B. Moseley Waite (1967) Associate Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S., Rollins; Ph.D., Duke. 

Lawrence C. Walker, Jr. (1972) Clinical Instructor in Obstetrics 

and Gynecology 
B.A., North Carolina; M.D., Duke. 

Roscoe L. Wall, Jr. (1967) Clinical Associate Professor of 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 
B.S., B.A., Wake Forest; M.D., Jefferson. 

Walter A. Ward (1967) Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Benedict L. Wasilauskas (1971) Assistant Professor of Pathology 

B.S., M.D., Mount Saint Mary's College; Ph.D., Connecticut. 

L. David Waterbury (1969) Assistant Professor of Pharmacology, 

B.S., Michigan; Ph.D., Vermont. Associate in Neurology 

Finley C. Watts (1967) Research Instructor in Radiology 

(Health Physics) 
B.S., Wake Forest. 

Lester Earl Watts (1965) Associate Professor of Medicine 

Associate in Community Medicine 
M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Frederick B. Weaver (1970) Clinical Instructor in Medicine 

A.B., Catawba College; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Richard G. Weaver (1954) Professor of Ophthalmology 

M.D., Washington. 

Duke B. Weeks (1972) Assistant Professor of Anesthesia 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Charles R. Welfare (1955) Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Pennsylvania. 

Charles M. Westrick (1970) Clinical Instructor in Dental Surgery 

D.D.S., Michigan. 

Emmett R. White (1970) Clinical Assistant Professor of Radiology 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

251 



Faculty 

Donald L. Whitener (1962) Clinical Associate Professor of 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 

A.B., Catawba; M.D., Johns Hopkins. 

Joseph E. Whitley (1960) Professor of Radiology 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Nancy ON. Whitley (1969) Assistant Professor of Radiology 

(Diagnostic Radiology) 

M.D., Bowman Gray. 

John C. Wiggins, Jr. (1954) Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine 

A.B., North Carolina; M.D., Harvard. 

Kathryn H. Williams (1973) Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry 

(Marriage Counseling) 
B.A., Miami; M.A., Wake Forest. 

Kenan B. Williams (1954) Clinical Instructor in Pediatrics 

A.B., North Carolina; M.D., Jefferson. 

Rodney C. Williams (1972) Instructor in Radiology (Electronics) 

B.S., Atlantic Christian; M.S., Syracuse; M.A., Wake Forest. 

S. Clay Williams, Jr. (1960) Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine 

A.B., Princeton; M.D., Pennsylvania. 

Richard L. Witcofski (1961) Professor of Radiology 

(Radiological Physics); Associate in Neurology 

B.S., Lynchburg; M.S., Vanderbilt; Ph.D., Wake Forest. 

Fred M. Wood (1972) Clinical Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery 

B.A., Mississippi; M.D., Tennessee. 

Donna B. Wocdmansee (1973) Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry 

(Marriage Counseling) 

B.A., University of Denver; M.A., Wake Forest. 

William D. Wright (1973) Clinical Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery 

B.S., Millsaps College; M.D., University of Virginia. 

James D. Yopp, Jr. (1972) Clinical Instructor in Medicine 

B.S., North Carolina State; M.D., Bowman Gray. 

Ernest H. Yount (1948) Professor of Medicine 

A.B., North Carolina; M.D., Vanderbilt. 

Robert Zammit (1968) Clinical Instructor in Obstetrics and 

Gynecology 

B.S., St. Peter's College; M.D., Creighton University. 

HASAN I. Zeya (1973) Research Assistant Professor of Medicine 

I.Sc, CM., College, India; M.D., Darbhanga Medical College, India; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina School of Medicine. 



252 




DEGREES CONFERRED 

253 



DEGREES CONFERRED MAY 28, 1973 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Harold Glenn Bohlen Fabian Broadway Jackson 

Eldon Elmore Eckard William Alan Sorber 

Ramon Rafael Gonzalez, Jr. Lorraine Barney Spencer 

Francis Fries Willingham, Jr. 



Master of Arts 



Susan M. Bennett 
John Daniel Bolz 
Norma Lee Carey 
Marlene Eller Cothren 
Robert Maurice Crawford 
Janette Marie Davis 
William Edward Dewart 
Scott Kenneth Durum 
Alan David Falk 
Nicholas P. Iannuzzi, III 
Cynthia Ann Kabat 



Dwight Thomas Kincaid 
Austin Jackie Luffman 
William Claude McConnell 
William Leander McLain, III 
Saleem Peeradina 
Charles Raymond Spell, Jr. 
Margaret Jane Tharrington 
Sarah Evelyn Redfearn Treadway 
Gilbert Bernard Tunnell, Jr. 
Randal Tipton Vaughn 
Thomas William Volk 



Master of Arts in Education 



Roxanne Kalb Barrier 

David Dean Belnap 

Michael Scott Booher 

Myrna Cheryel Huneycutt Bray 

Virginia Niblock Britt 

Bart Aaron Charlow 

Joe Paul Coffman 

Stephen Wray Comer 

Carolyn Shields Eldridge 

Susan Renee Furr 



Sue Ketner Gelarden 
Leroy Charles Kimmons 
Judith Ellen Land 
William Marshall Mackie, Jr. 
Leslie Louise Lucas Neumann 
Rolando V. Rivero M. 
Karen Ann Shortridge 
Don Bruce Swanson 
Sandra Walsh Taylor 
Susan Albert Wagoner 



Norma Lang Beaty 
Barbara W. Cann 



Master of Science 

Benjamin Martin Garrison 
Edward John Kosinski 
Patricia Tischler Rock 



Doctor of Medicine 



William Geer Alderman 
William Otis Ameen, Jr. 
David Scott Anderson 
Ronald Lisle Ashton 
Norman David Bernstein 
William Henry Bestermann, Jr. 
David Eric Blackwell 



John Craig Brown 
Steven Henry Buck 
Robert Hoyt Butler 
Tony Wayne Canupp 
Pamela Ann Conniff 
William Douglas Conrad, Jr. 
John Richard Cunningham 



254 



Degrees Conferred 



Jerome Irvin Davis 
Rosamuel Dawkins, Jr. 
William Marcus Eckerd 
Joseph John Estwanik, III 
William Arthur Fawcett, IV 
David Paul Feinstein 
Charles Samuel Fulk 
Kenneth Raynor Gallup, Jr. 
Frank Robert Glatz, Jr. 
Paul Joseph Grant 
John Gregg Hardy 
Walter Clark Hargrove, III 
Michael Floyd Harrah 
Jerry Ray Hemric 
Emily Jane Herron 
Dan Stephen Hollis 
Paul Alfred Holyfield 
William Amos Hough, III 
William Guerry Howard, Jr. 
Kenneth Allen Humphrey 
Clyde McCoy Hunt, Jr. 
David Paul Huston 
David DeWitt Jackson 
David Stone Jackson, Jr. 
Ronald James Janzen 
Robert William Kelly 
Edward John Kosinski 
Michael Neal Leblang 
Eric Spencer Marks 
Mark Stephen Mason 

Peter 



Richard James Miraglia 
Jerry Allen Montgomery 
Richard Earl Morgan 
David Allen Mrazek 
Thomas Paul Mutton 
Thomas George Neumann 
Leslie Joel Nyman 
Richard Leo Pantera, Jr. 
George Washington Paschal, III 
George Webb Plonk, Jr. 
Terry Wayne Poole 
Jimmy Douglas Price 
Peter Paul Price 
James Laurence Ransom 
Francis William Rieger 
Thomas Little Robinson 
John Lawrence Rouse, III 
Charles Walter Scarantino 
George William Schweitzer 
Steven Seth Shay 
William Herbert Shoemaker, Jr. 
Eugene Myers Simpson, Jr. 
John Larry Simpson 
Ronald Karl Staib 
Ned Barry Stein 
Jane Dilling Todd 
Robert Paul Vidinghoff 
John Frederick Whalley 
William Stover Wiggins 
John Frederick Willen 
Shuford Yount 



Alfred Gray Adams 
Dwight Woodard Allen 
Carl Wilburn Atkinson, Jr. 
William Taylor Biggers 
Jerry Steven Brackett 
Ellis Meredith Bragg, Jr. 
Benjamin Hudson Bridges, 
Ronald Cole Brown 
Steven Elmore Byerly 
Wade E. Byrd 
Robert Kyle Catherwood 
Joseph Blount Cheshire, V 
Harry Thomas Church 
James Calvin Cook 
Robert Hugh Corbett 



Juris Doctor 

Janet Little Covey 
James Estes Cross, Jr. 
William Thomas Culper, III 
Francis Earl Dail 
Robert Henry Diday 
Charles Francis Eakes 
III John Joseph Early 

James Carl Eubanks, III 
DeLyle Mooring Evans 
Ryland Lee Farmer 
Thomas Eric Fields 
James Richard Foley 
Bruce Cameron Fraser 
Daniel Alan Frazier 
Thomas Robert Frizzell 



255 



Degrees Conferred 



Edwin R. Gatton 
Richard Lee Goard 
Hampton Grey Goode, Jr. 
Randy Stephen Gregory 
Larry Fricke Habegger 
Douglas Bruce Hanna 
Benjamin Hackett Harding, Jr. 
Clyde Martin Harvey 
William H. Heafner 
Edward Burr Higgins, Jr. 
T. Paul Hendrick 
Paul Preston Hinkle, Jr. 
Walter Lee Hinson 
Robert Emril Hodges 
William Riley Hollingsworth, Jr. 
I. Manning Huske 
George Benjamin Hyler, Jr. 
William Thomas Jeffries 
Walton Carter Jeannette, Jr. 
Vaughn Edward Jennings, Jr. 
Robert Francis Johnson 
Marion Lawrence Johnston, Jr. 
Charles Roland Krueger 
Thomas L. Kummer 
William Hutchins Lambe, Jr. 
Richard Frederic Landis, II 
Moses Dow Lasitter 
Robert James Lawing 
Emmett Stevenson Lupton, Jr. 
Robert Eric McCarter 
Harold Paul McCoy, Jr. 
John Goodman McDougald 
Roger Phillip Main 
Allan Michael Migdall 

Cynthia 



Kenneth Martin Millman 
M. Beirne Minor 
William Smithy Moore, Jr. 
George Richard Murphy 
Joseph Trippe Nail 
Ernest Hilton Newman 
Richmond Hawley Page 
John Porter Paisley, Jr. 
John Lawrence Pinnix 
Marvin Pinkney Pope, Jr. 
Thomas William Prince 
Larry Grant Reavis 
Jimmy Dean Reeves 
Michael Charles Reeves 
Gary Franklin Roberson 
Dennis Leonard Salvagio 
Michael Andrew Schlosser 
James Bernard Spears, Jr. 
Clyde Franklin Stanley, Jr. 
Robert Harvey Swennes, II 
Robert Gaither Tanner 
John Ellwood Tantum 
David Keith Teague 
Brian Hunter Tenney 
Charles Everett Thompson, II 
Clyde Gary Triggs 
Blake W. Trimble 
Elton Glenn Tucker 
John Percy VanZandt, III 
Jerry Flippin Waddell 
James M. Wallace, Jr. 
Cecil Linsey Whitley 
Gary Worth Williard 
Melvin Forbes Wright, Jr. 
Jean Zeliff 



Bachelor of Science 



Nancy Elizabeth Alberty 
Kathleen Charlotte Anderson 
Kathryn Moore Atkinson 
John Jay Ayres 
Horace Mitchell Baker, III 
Gerald Franklin Barber 
Janet Elizabeth Beavers 
Kenneth Roland Blanton 
Cecil Holly Bradley, Jr. 
Robert James Brick 
James Houston Brooks 



Donald Eugene Brown 
Roderick Jackson Buie, Jr. 
Michael Thomas Capone 
Steven Arthur Carchedi 
Herman Bryan Cobb 
Stephen Laurie Cochran 
Richard Dale Cothren 
Richard Cole Craven 
Charles Keith Craver 
Marcus Lee Craver 
James Mitchell Currin, Jr. 



256 



Degrees Conferred 



Martha Leola Danner 
Freddie Redwan David 
Jefferson Underwood Davis 
Joyce Desch 
James Bailey Dolan 
Susan Anne Dorsett 
George Raymond Everhart, III 
Sharon Ann Findley 
Sandra Elizabeth Fisher 
William Blake Ford 
Elizabeth Anne Fritz 
Nancy Carol Garlick 
Robert Henry Garner 
Melinda Kay Gentry 
Gary Leonard German 
Craig Lee Gillikin 
Charles William Glass 
Linda Kaye Gordon 
Robert Allen Graves 
Richard Jefferson Gregory 
David Herbert Grundies 
Julius Eugene Hodge, III 
Beth Anne Houpt 
Claudia Faye Humphries 
Larry Lee Hurst 
Linda Kaye Ison 
Thomas Richard Jamison 
Barbara Jo Johnson 
James Joseph Jowdy, Jr. 
Sandra Eschen Keel 
John Harbin Keener 
Katherine Wells Keller 
Patrick Mark Kelly 
Carolyn R. Kerr 
Roy Donald Kilgore 
Jacob Lawson Kincaid, Jr. 
John Howard Knight 
Kenneth Frank Lanzillo, Jr. 
Carol Elizabeth Lewis 
Norvelle Charles Lilley, Jr. 
Robert Marion Lombard, Jr. 
Frank Henry Longino, Jr. 
Lane Alan Love 
James Donald McCreary 
Peter Barr Martin 
Marcus Thompson Meachum 
Gail Louise Melson 
Carolyn Louise Miller 



Albert Garver Moore, Jr. 
Thomas Newton Mory 
Gregory Edward Moss 
William Herbert Nash 
Joseph Moore Neal 
John Stephen Orenczak 
Elizabeth Kay Owen 
William Harold Parker 
James Arthur Perdue 
Arthur Josephus Preslar, III 
Marc Edward Reinecke 
James Harold Reynierson, III 
Debra Jan Rhodes 
Bertha Parthenia Richardson 
Timothy Michael Rigby 
Allan Randall Riggs 
Norma Jean Parsley Robinson 
David Mark Royalty 
Doris Estelle Russell 
Joan Barrett Russell 
Robbie Dale Sawyer 
George Edward Schertzinger 
John Raymond Schleppegrell, Jr. 
Judith Lynn Schoolfield 
Timothy Edward Schultheiss 
Harry Gene Shaver 
John Holloway Sherrill 
Richard Craig Siler 
Edward Thompson Smith, Jr. 
Gerald Thomas Smith 
Stephen Peck Smith 
Gay Williams Stelter 
Phillip Reid Suttles 
Randel Keith Temples 
Bradley Davis Templeton 
William Wayne Trowell 
Larry Franklin Tuggle 
Edward Anthony Tupin 
James Baxter Turner, III 
James David Turner 
Mark Robert Turner 
John Voorhies, III 
Mary Catherine Walker 
John Wesley Ward, III 
Steven Paul Wentworth 
Frances Louise Whitaker 
William John Wieland 
Donald Myatt Williams 



257 



Degrees Conferred 



James Earl Wood 
Richard Elliott Wynne 



Lindsay Clement Yancey, Jr. 
William R. Yoder 



Bachelor of Arts 



Jones Carroll Abernethy, III 
Mary Denise Adair 
Joseph Douglas Aldrich 
Pamela Jane Alexander 
Thomas Michael Alexander 
Carol Ward Allushuski 
Alexis Jane Anderson 
Billy Gray Anderson 
George Arthur Anderson, II 
Jean Davis Andrews 
Nancy Olivia Andrews 
Thomas Temple Atkinson 
Pauline P. Badgett 
Blair Terrell Ball 
Edward Stephen Ballew 
Thomas Nolen Barefoot 
Sandra Marlys Barnes 
Timothy Lee Barnes 
William Hatchett Bason, Jr. 
Perry John Becker 
William Benjamin Beery, IV 
George Hamilton Bell, Jr. 
Carroll Ann Betzold 
Catharine Grace Biggs 
Steven Guy Billings 
James Walter Blackburn 
Cheryl Kay Blanchard 
Walter Douglas Bland 
Mike Church Blankenship 
Michael Henry Blatt 
Jon Scott Bolton 
Edward Stephen Booher, Jr. 
Walter Dick Bosstick 
Barbara Moore Bowling 
Harold Dean Bowman 
George Phillip Boyer 
Don William Bradley 
William Archibald Bradsher 
Sherrill Douglas Braswell, Jr. 
Stephen John Braun 
William Lee Briggs 
Charlotte Anne Brillhart 
William Alfred Britt, Jr. 
Robert Stephen Brock 



Shirley Cayton Broome 
Clement Eugene Brown 
James Cletus Brown 
Robert Wilson Brown 
John Anthony K. Browning 
Gayle Ann Brumbaugh 
Richard Chickering Burton, Jr. 
Joseph Scott Byrd 
Margaret Woodruff Cage 
Gary Frank Cagle 
Beverly Ann Callaway 
Nadia Aldyth Carrell 
Paula Cay Carter 
Charles William Cashman, III 
David Edwin Cassels 
James Alexander Caywood, IV 
Frankie Dale Chappell 
Margaret Ernes Chappell 
Anne Kimbrough Charbonneau 
Mary Elizabeth Charles 
Lewis Alexander Cheek 
Richard Francis Chulada 
Larry Clifford Clark 
William Bryan Coleman, Jr. 
Thomas Raymond Combs 
Bruce Sumner Cooper 
David Alan Copeland 
Debra Lynn Craig 
John Garretson Cronin 
William Worth Croom 
William Henry Crouch, Jr. 
Frances Ann Culp 
Sandra Eileen Cummings 
Michael Franklin Currin 
Teresa Katheryn Currin 
Karen Leigh Curry 
Thomas Hofmann Daly 
Larry Gray Davis 
Marian Louise Davis 
Susan Marie Davis 
David Alan Deacon 
Richard Lowell Delanoy, Jr. 
Myra Jean LeLapp 
Franklin McLeod Dew 



258 



Degrees Conferred 



Bruce Alexander Dickson 
Manuel Thomas Dodson, II 
David Rodney Duke 
Dana Lloyd Dye 
John Poole Elliott, III 
James William Elliott, III 
Richard Douglas Englar 
Dorilyn English 
Karen Lane Faircloth 
Patricia Nancy Fallon 
James Thaniel Faucette 
Jacqueline Ruth Fehon 
Bradford Alan Field 
Earl Thomas Fife 
Martha Dell Finlator 
James Arthur Fitch 
William Hough Flowe, Jr. 
Gregory Matthews Fogle 
Martha Ann Folmar 
Edward Joyner Foltz 
Sara Lee Foster 
Lynda Carole Fowler 
Michael Allen Fowler 
William Harrison Freeman, Jr. 
William Cort Frohlich 
Kirk Kennedy Fuller 
Robert Benjamin Fulton, II 
Sarah Elizabeth Garrard 
John Wilson Gaston 
Janet Maria Gibson 
Neil Arthur Godfrey 
Joseph Lee Goodman, Jr. 
Sandra Kay Grant 
Deborah Janet Graves 
Franklin Bailey Green 
John Walter Green 
Max Newton Greer, Jr. 
Frederick Richard Griffin 
Minor Fox Griscom 
James Percival Grover, Jr. 
Janice Lynn Gruber 
Gary Roy Gunderson 
Gregory Allen Haddock 
Wayne Philip Hagenbuch 
Mary Dibrelle Haile 
Christopher Robert Harding 
Randall Somers Harmon 
David Lawson Harrill 



Justus Everett Harris 
Debra Jo Hartis 
Clayton Wayne Hartley 
Michael Quintin Hauser 
Stephen Lee Hawthorne 
Joseph Rosser Haymes 
Janice Selena Head 
Nancy Carol Higgins 
Robert David Hill 
William Pemberton Hinson, III 
Guy Lynn Hipp 
Janice Watson Hipp 
Freddie Catherine Hobson 
Alice Jeannette Hodges 
Warren Charles Hodges 
Michael Alan Hohlfelder 
Caroline Elizabeth Hoke 
Carol Baucom Holden 
Gregory Brian Holden 
Lawrence Norbert Holden, III 
Robert Lewis Hook, Jr. 
Celia Routh Hooper 
Muriel Norbrey Hopkins 
Richard Thomas Howerton, III 
Harry William Hubbard, Jr. 
Robert Ball Hulbert, Jr. 
Charlie Armon Hunt, Jr. 
Danny Edward Huntley 
James Edward Husbands 
Donald John Hutchison 
Jean Schulken Jackson 
William Leon Jackson, III 
John Milton Jenkins, Jr. 
James Powell Jenkins 
Gregory Johnson 
Gary William Johnson 
Deborah Claire Jones 
Peter Jeffery Jones 
Robert Allan Jones 
Elizabeth Hammond Jordan 
Michael Riley Jordan 
Douglas Eugene Kahle 
Marcia Frances Kennedy 
Randolph Maurice Kemp 
Robert William Kendall 
John Richard Kendrick, Jr. 
Joseph Roy Kirkman 
Lawrence Webb Kissell 



259 



Degrees Conferred 



James Lee Knight 
Steve Komo-ndorea 
Carolynn Hunt Kornegay 
Frederick Richard Kozak 
Nancy Rich Kuhn 
John Robert Kummer 
Constantine Hanna Kutteh, II 
Richard Eldon Leithiser, Jr. 
Sandra Jean Lemmerman 
Jane Archer Lewis 
Stephen Myers Liebert 
Billy Irvin Long, Jr. 
Lawrence Allen Lyon 
Gary Robert McConnell 
Dinah White McCotter 
James Lamar McCoy, Jr. 
Kemp Burl McCuiston 
Susan Ann McDonald 
Stefani Lynn McGee 
Douglas Worth McMillan 
William Steven Mannear 
Susan Laurie Marshall 
Frederick Harding Martin 
Thomas Wilbur Martin, Jr. 
Warren Howard Maxon, II 
Jean Anne Melville 
Pamela Sue Michael 
Beth Marie Miller 
David Douglas Miller 
George Coates Milne, IV 
Ralph Emmett Minder, Jr. 
Carol Elizabeth Moody 
Betty Elaine Moore 
Deborah Rosetta Moore 
Julie Lee Moore 
Terry Elizabeth Moore 
John Myers Morehead 
Janice Elaine Mortimer 
Julia Lynn Morton 
Thomas Kent Mundorf 
James Patrick Mundy 
Margaret Shoupe Murray 
Deborah Warner Nance 
Awilda Gilliam Neal 
James Byron Nelson 
Olivia Ann Nelson 
Cynthia Anne Newton 
David Keith Nichols 



Cristine Marie Nietz 

Robert Murray O'Brian 

Terrence Francis O'Donnell 

David William Ohmberger 

Faye Pait Orr 

Harrison Deva Orr 

Karen Lynn Paige 

Wayne Curtis Palfrey 

George Edward Penn, II 

Eugene Elehu Pepinsky, Jr. 

Donald Edward Perry 

Sherylle Suzanne Petty 

Stephen Douglas Poe 

Robert Wade Poole, Jr. 

Janice Ruth Pope 

Paula Mary Potoczak 

Ida Grace Jennings Powell 

Nellie Denise Pratt 

Katherine Reeves Purcell 

Walter Nesbitt Query 

Alice Virginia Rainey 

Andrew Harvey Ralston 

Nancy Althea Ramsey 

Deborah Jean Rardin 

James Edward Rash 

Joan Elizabeth Ray 

Linda Dixon Reinecke 

Michael John Reith 

Henry Charles Tyler Richmond, III 

William Alfred Riemer, Jr. 

Thomas Alfred Robinson 

Jill Wallace Robison 

Janet Suzanne Rodgers 

Dennis Romano 

William Taylor Ross, Jr. 

Samuel Parker Rothrock 

Joseph Stephen Rowell 

Daniel Leonard Rubbo 

Florence Lynne Rutherford 

Camille Rosemary Russell 

June Ann Sabah 

Jack Wade Sarver, Jr. 

Steven Curtis Sarver 

Rebecca Louise Schmidt 

William VanKirk Scholl 

Judith Scruggs 

Darrell Lee Sechrest, Jr. 

Nancy Allen Sellars 



260 



Degrees Conferred 



Ernest Marshall Sewell 
Judith Elaine Shackleford 
Floyd Eugene Sherrill 
Robert Innes Shoaf 
Suzanne Warren Shumate 
Celia Ellen Singhas 
Bradley Linton Smith 
Carol Sue Smith 
Jennifer Jo Smith 
James Kenneth Smith, II 
Jane Leonard Smith 
Ronald Keith Smith 
Suellen Cothran Smith 
John Allie Snow 
Steven Eugene Stewart 
Tod Franklin Stimson 
Clifton Harold Strader, Jr. 
Rhys Clay Sueur 
Douglas Burns Sullivan 
Richard Bruce Sutton 
Donald Jeffrey Swanson 
Steven Jennings Sweeney 
Frances Scott Sweet 
James Garman Tapley, Jr. 
Krikor B. Tatoyan 
John Brockenbrough Taylor 
David Christopher Teague 
William Jesse Teague 
Ellen Jane Thompson 
Michael Eugene Thompson 
James L. Tindall 
David Bruce Toth 
Harry Walter Townshend, III 
Grady Edward Tunstall 
Charles Braxton Turpin 
Ghanshyam Girdharlal Udani 



Ayse Ezher Uremez 
Tye Wynne VanBuren 
John David Vickery, III 
Alfred Donald Viscito 
Victoria Ann Wallace 
Edward Mason Waller 
Candice Patricia Warren 
James Michael Warren 
Sharon Scarborough Waters 
Linda Elaine Watkins 
Carroll Edwin Watts 
Sandra Ann Watts 
Peggy G. Welch 
Roberta Parker Welch 
Sara Frances Welch 
Robert Arnett Wells 
William Stewart Wells 
John Franklin Whitley, III 
Peter Knox Wilcox 
William Michael Willard 
Evelyn Victoria Williams 
Janice Catherine Williams 
James Page Williams 
Susan Lynn Williams 
Thomas Abel Williams, III 
Douglas Mark Williamson 
Sam Ray Wilmoth 
Catherine Paulette Wilson 
Mary Elizabeth Witt Wilson 
Patricia James Wilson 
William Lawrence Wilson 
Martha Joan Wiseman 
Claude Flippin Woods 
David Earl Wyatt 
Thomas Hill Yonce 
Jan Marie Zachowski 



Bachelor of Business Administration 



Timothy David Benintendi 

Joan Marie Shallcross Belnap 

John Durburrow Blair 

Lindsay Carroll Browning 

Ellis Spencer Bullins 

Malcolm Alexander Campbell, III 

Stanley Marvin Campbell 

Neville Alson Chaney 

David Evanda Crowder, Jr. 

Francis Michael Crowley 



Dwight Lonnie Gentry 
David Wayne Hill 
Micheal Douglas Jernigan 
Patrick Gregory Jones 
Walter Malone Keel 
George Whitfield McDowell 
Gary Alan Moon 
Willie Pate, Jr. 
Harvey Gilbert Powell, III 
William Jennings Scott, Jr. 



261 



Awards and Honors 



Cecil Norman Smith, Jr. Louis Edward Tatarski 

Sheila Gay Snow Thomas Gregory Viilo 

David Lee Zimmer 

HONORARY DEGREES 

Doctor of Letters 
Wallace Carroll 

Doctor of Humane Letters 
Margaret Truman Daniel 

Doctor of Divinity 
William W. Finlator 

Doctor of Science 
Phillip A. Griffiths 

Doctor of Laws 
Ralph P. Hanes 

AWARDS AND HONORS 
1. FROM THE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Graduating with honors in: 

Arts and Sciences: John Walter Green 

Economics: Thomas Alfred Robinson, Jane Leonard Smith 
English: James Hedrick Mashburn 

History: Alexis Jane Anderson, John Garretson Cronin, Richard 
Douglas Englar, John Poole Elliott, III, John Robert Rummer, 
Nellie Denise Pratt, Thomas Alfred Robinson 
Mathematics: Nancy Elizabeth Alberty, Linda Kaye Gordon, Roy 

Donald Kilgore 
Philosophy: David Alan Deacon, Tye Wynne VanBuren 
Physics: Timothy Edward Schultheiss, James David Turner 
Psychology: Debra Lynn Craig, Teresa Katheryn Currin, Nancy 
Carol Higgins, Douglas Eugene Kahle, Constantine Hannah 
Kutteh, Terry Elizabeth Moore, Suellen Cothran Smith 
The Forest W. Clonts Award for Excellence in History: Alexis Jane 

Anderson, John Poole Elliott, III 
The Claud H. Richards Award for Excellence in Politics: Robert 

Innes Shoaf 
The Tom Baker Award in Debate: Richard Kendrick 
The Tom Baker Award in Publications: John Poole Elliott, III 
The Joseph B. Currin Medal in Religion: John A. Snow 
The American Bible Society Award for Excellence in Biblical Scholar- 
ship: James Thaniel Faucette 
The William E. Speas Memorial Award in Physics: Timothy Edward 

Shultheiss 
The H. Broadus Jones Award in Shakespeare: Cynthia Newton 

262 



Awards and Honors 



Elected to Phi Beta Kappa (1973) 



Kathleen Charlotte Anderson 
Catherine Grace Biggs 
Cheryl Kay Blanchard 
Sherrill Douglas Braswell, Jr. 
Steven Arthur Carchedi 
Nadia Aldyth Carroll 
Lewis Alexander Cheek 
Herman Bryan Cobb 
Richard Dale Cothren 
William Franklin Cowley 
Charles Keith Craver 
David Alan Deacon 
Marcia Kennedy Deaton 
Dana Lloyd Dye 
Richard Douglas Englar 
James Thaniel Faucette 
Elizabeth Ann Fritz 
Janet Maria Gibson 
John Walter Green 
Elizabeth M. Hargrave 
Stephen Lee Hawthorne 
Janice Selena Head 
Nancy Carol Higgins 
Beth Anne Houpt 
Danny Edward Huntley 



Seniors 

Linda Kaye Ison 
Gary William Johnson 
John Harbin Keener 
Constance Hanna Kutteh 
Richard Eldon Leithiser, Jr. 
Sandra Jean Lemmerman 
Pamela Sue Michael 
Nellie Denise Pratt 
Dennis Romano 
Doris Estella Russell 
Joan Barrett Russell 
Florence Lynn Rutherford 
John Holloway Sherrill 
Robert Innes Shoaf 
Suzanne Warren Shumate 
Jennifer Jo Smith 
Suellen Cothran Smith 
Judith Bebeau Stange 
Bradley Davis Templeton 
James David Turner 
Harold Vaughn Vannoy 
John Wesley Ward, III 
Evelyn Victoria Williams 
Susan Lynn Williams 
Thomas Hill Yonce 



Lelia Annette Blackmon 
Randy Hitt Butler 
Elizabeth Bradley Conner 
John Charles Loewenstein 
Michael Alan Malpass 
Jane Anne Miller 
Arthur Guyer Osberg 



Juniors 

James Joseph Petillo 
Randolph Sprint Powers 
Daniel Foster Stroupe 
Wendell Howard Tiller, Jr. 
Philip Lee Washburn 
Burt Helgaas Whitt 
Robert Lee Yancy 



2. FROM THE CHARLES H. BABCOCK SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

The Lura Baker Paden Medal: Charles Keith Craver 

The A. M. Pullen Company Medal: Kathryn Moore Atkinson 

The Wall Street Journal Award: David Evanda Crowder, Jr. 

3. FROM THE BABCOCK GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MANAGE- 
MENT 

Graduation with distinction: Mary Faeth Chenery, James Warren 
Fredrickson, James E. Martin 



263 



Awards and Honors 



4. FROM THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

Student Advocacy Award: Benjamin Hudson Bridges, III 
The Warren A. Seavey Award: Robert James Lawing 
United States Law Week Award: Robert James Lawing 

5. FROM THE BOWMAN GRAY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 
Annie J. Covington Memorial Award: Walter C. Hargrove, III 

C. B. Deane Memorial Award: J. Laurence Ransom, Charles W. 
Scarantino 

Pediatric Merit Award: William A. Fawcett, IV 

Obstetrics-Gynecology Merit Award: Paul A. Holyfield 

Welch- Kempton Myasthenia Gravis Research Award: Francis W. 

Rieger 
Upjohn Achievement Award: Edward J. Kosinki 
Faculty Award: Edward J. Kosinki 

Seniors Elected to Alpha Omega Alpha 

David E. Blackwell George W. Paschal 

Robert H. Butler George W. Plonk 

Kenneth R. Gallup Terry W. Poole 

John G. Hardy John L. Rouse 

Edward J. Kosinski John L. Simpson 

Eric S. Marks Robert P. Vidinghoff 

6. FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE 
President's Trophy: Cadet Captain Stanley A. Gest 

Superior Cadet Decoration: Cadet First Lieutenant Richard C. Bur- 
ton, Jr. 

ROTC Certificate of Meritorious Leadership: Cadet First Lieutenant 
Richard C. Burton, Jr. 

The Professor of Military Science Award: Cadet First Sergeant 
Charlie A. Hunt, Jr. 

American Legion Award for Military Excellence: Cadet Second Lieu- 
tenant Randy S. Gregory 

Daughters of the American Revolution ROTC Medal: Cadet Captain 
Stanley A. Gest 

American Veterans of World War II Award for Superior Perform- 
ance: Cadet Second Lieutenant David B. Toth 

THE COMMENCEMENT MARSHALS 

Marylou Cooper — Head Student Marshal 

Lelia Annette Blackmon Michael Malpass 

Nancy Dodd Boyd Cynthia Lynne Millsaps 

Randy Hitt Butler Mollie McKay Morrow 

Nancy Lynne Castles Sheryl Stone Newcomb 

Dorothy Quincey Gooding Arthur Guyer Osberg 

Carlyn Sue Jeffries Randolph Sprint Powers 

264 



Graduation Distinctions 



Betty Louise Rankin 
Daniel Foster Stroup 
Wendell Howard Tiller 



Jerome Alexander White 
Nancy Carol Williams 
Robert Lee Yancey 



Cadets to Be Commissioned at Wake Forest University 



Kenneth Robert Benton 
Richard Chickering Burton, Jr. 
Charles Dudley Coppage 
Joseph Stephen Gaydica, III 
Stanley Anthony Gest 
Robert Maurice Grant, Jr. 
Randy Stephen Gregory 
Charlie Armon Hunt, Jr. 



Frederick Harding Martin 
David Douglas Miller 
James Byron Nelson 
Douglas Floyd Osborne, Jr. 
Carl Arthur Peterson 
Henry Charles Tyler Richmond, III 
John Raymond Schleppegrell, Jr. 
David Bruce Toth 



GRADUATION DISTINCTIONS 



Cum Laude 



Kathleen Charlotte Anderson 
Kathryn Moore Atkinson 
Thomas Temple Atkinson 
Catharine Grace Biggs 
Cheryl Kay Blanchard 
George Phillip Boyer 
William Lee Briggs 
Ronald C. Brown 
Richard Chickering Burton, Jr. 
Margaret Woodruff Cage 
Steven Arthur Carchedi 
Nadia Aldyth Carrell 
David Edwin Cassels 
Margaret Ernes Chappell 
Stephen Laurie Cochran 
Richard Dale Cothren 
Janet L. Covey 
Debra Lynn Craig 
John Garretson Cronin 
Sandra Eileen Cummings 
James Mitchell Currin, Jr. 
Teresa Katheryn Currin 
Jefferson Underwood Davis 
Susan Marie Davis 
Richard Lowell Delanoy, Jr. 
Joyce Desch 
David Rodney Duke 
James William Elliott, III 
Richard Douglas Englar 



James C. Eubanks 
George Raymond Everhart, III 
Patricia Nancy Fallon 
James Thaniel Faucette 
Jacqueline Ruth Fehon 
Earl Thomas Fife 
Martha Dell Finlator 
Sandra Elizabeth Fisher 
William Hough Flowe, Jr. 
Sara Lee Foster 
Lynda Carole Fowler 
Bruce C. Fraser 
Janet Maria Gibson 
Joseph Lee Goodman, Jr. 
Sandra Kay Grant 
Franklin Bailey Green 
Max Newton Greer, Jr. 
Randy S. Gregory 
Janice Lynn Gruber 
Benjamin H. Harding, Jr. 
Justus Everett Harris 
Debra Jo Hartis 
Michael Quintin Hauser 
Stephen Lee Hawthorne 
David Wayne Hill 
Alice Jeannette Hodges 
Warren Charles Hodges 
Carol Baucom Holden 
Muriel Norbrey Hopkins 



265 



Graduation Distinctions 



Richard Thomas Howerton, III 
Claudia Faye Humphries 
Charlie Armon Hunt, Jr. 
Danny Edward Huntley 
Larry Lee Hurst 
William Leon Jackson, III 
Barbara Jo Johnson 
Patrick Gregory Jones 
Douglas Eugene Kahle 
Sandra Eschen Keel 
Walter Malone Keel 
Roy Donald Kilgore 
Nancy Rich Kuhn 
John Robert Kummer 
Thomas L. Kummer 
Richard Eldon Leithiser, Jr. 
Jane Archer Lewis 
Robert Marion Lombard, Jr. 
James Lamar McCoy, Jr. 
Susan Ann McDonald 
Stefani Lynn McGee 
Susan Laurie Marshall 
Thomas Wilbur Martin, Jr. 
Gail Louise Melson 
David Douglas Miller 
Gary Alan Moon 
Julia Lee Moore 
Terry Elizabeth Moore 
Joseph Moore Neal 
Cynthia Anne Newton 
Cristine Marie Nietz 
Eugene Elehu Pepinsky, Jr. 
Stephen Douglas Poe 
Janice Ruth Pope 
Nancy Althea Ramsey 
Joan Elizabeth Ray 
Debra Jan Rhodes 
Thomas Alfred Robinson 

Thomas 



Janet Suzanne Rodgers 
William Taylor Ross, Jr. 
Florence Lynne Rutherford 
Stephen Curtis Sarver 
Robbie Dale Sawyer 
Judith Scruggs 
Nancy Allen Sellars 
John Holloway Sherrill 
Jennifer Jo Smith 
Ronald Keith Smith 
John Allie Snow 
Clifton Harold Strader, Jr. 
Donald Jeffrey Swanson 
Frances Scott Sweet 
Robert G. Tanner 
John E. Tantum 
John Brockenbrough Taylor 
Bradley Davis Templeton 
David Bruce Toth 
Grady Edward Tunstall 
James David Turner 
Ghanshyam Girdharlal Udani 
Ayse Ezher Uremez 
Tye Wynne VanBuren 
Alfred Donald Viscito 
Mary Catherine Walker 
John Wesley Ward, III 
Candice Patricia Warren 
Peggy G. Welch 
Roberta Parker Welch 
Sara Frances Welch 
Robert Arnet Wells 
William Stewart Wells 
Steven Paul Wentworth 
Peter Knox Wilcox 
William Michael Willard 
Douglas Mark Williamson 
Catherine Paulette Wilson 
Hill Yonce 



Nancy Elizabeth Alberty 
Alexis Jane Anderson 
Sherrill Douglas Braswell, Jr. 
Lewis Alexander Cheek 
Herman Bryan Cobb 
Charles Keith Craver 
Frances Ann Culp 



Magna Cum Laude 

David Alan Deacon 
Dana Lloyd Dye 
Elizabeth Anne Fritz 
John Walter Green 
Stephen Lee Hawthorne 
Nancy Carol Higgins 
Beth Anne Houpt 



266 



Graduation Distinctions 



Linda Kaye Ison 
Gary William Johnson 
John Harbin Keener 
Constantine Hannah Kutteh, III 
Robert James Lawing 
Sandra Jean Lemmerman 
Pamela Sue Michael 
Albert Garver Moore, Jr. 



Betty Elaine Moore 
Nellie Denise Pratt 
Dennis Romano 
Doris Estelle Russell 
Joan Barrett Russell 
Robert Innes Shoaf 
Evelyn Victoria Williams 
Susan Lynn Williams 



Martha Joan Wiseman 



Summa Cum Laude 



John Poole Elliott, III 
Linda Kaye Gordon 
Janice Selena Head 
Kemp Burl McCuiston 



Timothy Edward Schultheiss 
Suzanne Warren Shumate 
Jane Leonard Smith 
Suellen Cothran Smith 



Harry Walter Townshend, III 



267 



DEGREES CONFERRED JANUARY 30, 1973 



Richard Carl Franson 



Doctor of Philosophy 

John Doliver Newkirk, II 



Johnnie Virginia Anderson 
Betty Jean Shue Benardo 
Jacqueline Guffey Calaway 
Robert Edward Frank 
Robert Morse Hathaway, Jr. 
Robert Sydney Havely 
Oliver Benjamin Ingram, Jr. 
Joanne Sherk Micka 



Master of Arts 

William Clarence Moose 
Cornelius John Murphy, III 
John Edward Nottingham, IV 
Douglas Edward Reinhardt 
Robert Patrick Robertson 
Larry Bruce Sweazey 
George Thanassoulas 
Robert Wood White 



Master of Arts in Education 
David Andrew Connors, III Karen Ann Fallon 

Catherine Bertie Tilghman 



Linda Carol McPhail 
John Joseph Toma, Jr. 



Master of Science 

O. Theodore Wendel, Jr. 
Lynda Rigsbee Weston 



Bachelor of Arts 



Carol Ward Allushuski 
James Bascom Brower, Jr. 
Willis Walter Cleveland 
George Gray Cunningham 
James Dewey Edwards, Jr. 
Dorilyn English 
Bruce Cameron Fraser 
Daniel Alan Frazier 
Donald Lewis Groves 
Edward Thomas Hannum, Jr. 
Elizabeth McMurray Hargrave 
Virginia Hill 
Janice Watson Hipp 
Celia Routh Hooper 
William Rucker Hudson, Jr. 
Elizabeth Hammond Jordan 
Marcia Frances Kennedy 
Michael Robert King 
Minehardt Ray Lambeth 
Louis Jerome Lichtefeld, Jr. 
Stephen Myers Liebert 



James Hedrick Mashburn 
Fair Alexandra Meeks 
Rebecca Vickory Minor 
Linda Ann Moore 
Margaret Shoupe Murray 
Harrison Deva Orr 
Stephen Vinson Oviatt 
Terry Everette Peele 
Randolph Gray Perryman 
Ida Grace Jennings Powell 
Camille Rosemary Russell 
Joyce Angela Smith 
Judith Bebeau Stange 
Shelley Anderson Stall 
Lois Helena Stovall 
Janine Williams Toomes 
Victoria Ann Wallace 
Sharon Scarborough Waters 
Paul Alexander Weinman 
Neil Joseph Wilcox 
Patricia James Wilson 



Mary Elizabeth Witt Wilson 



268 



Degrees Conferred 



Bachelor of Science 

James S. Callison Douglas Mather Mabee 

Robert William Cress, Jr. Margaret Flagler MacLaren 

Martha Leola Danner Susan Clay Nations 

John Dixon Davis, III Delbert George Neher 

Alan King Fulks James Wayne Nelson 

Donald Leo Hensley Edward Thompson Smith, Jr. 

Gary Joseph Johnson David Frank Weir 

Bachelor of Business Administration 
Joan Marie Shallcross Belknap Thomas Howard Chappell 

John Campbell Glover, III 

Juris Doctor 
Robert Henry Diday James Richard Foley 

GRADUATION DISTINCTIONS 

Cum Laude 
Janice Watson Hipp Fair Alexandra Meeks 

Celia Routh Hooper Susan Clay Nations 

James Hedrick Mashburn Terry Everette Peele 

Magna Cum Laude 
Marcia Frances Kennedy Judith Bebeau Stange 



269 



SUMMER DIVISION OF THE CLASS OF 1973 

Saturday, August 4 

DEGREES CONFERRED 

Doctor of Philosophy 
Gary D. Niblack 



Jill C. Armistead 
Nancy G. Bassett 
Bernard S. Bettinelli 
George L. Burke 
Diane M. Calhoun 
John M. Cooper 
Jane B. Dolbin 
Keith H. Griffiin 
Joseph P. Hollis, Jr. 



Glenn T. Anderson 
Edward C. Armstrong 
Gigi Z. Austin 
Robert C. Baker 
Ellen G. Ball 
Sandra E. Folsom 



Master of Arts 

Edith K. Horowitz 
Sherita C. Leonardo 
Paul L. McCraw 
Albert H. Marshall 
James W. Morton 
Dean R. Mullis 
Priscilla I. Spach 
Janis R. Snow 
William P. Stover 

Master of Arts in Education 

Gwendolyn C. Hager 
Bruce N. Hall 
Nancy R. Kimmons 
Nancy K. Sweazey 
Stuart T. Wright 
John H. Yates 



Babcock Graduate School of Management 

Master of Business Administration 
Sudhir Manik Lotlikar 



Bachelor of Arts 



Deborah June Ardan 
Gregory Cowan Braswell 
Norman Yates Chambliss 
James Franklin Clemmons, III 
William Franklin Cowley, III 
Kathleen Johanna Taylor Diday 
Lindsay William Gray 
Phyllis Moore Hole 
Julian Samuel Johnson, III 
Romey Kenneth Langston 
Daniel M. Meyers 



William Hugh Mitchell 
Michael Terry Parks 
Phillip Gregory Robertson 
James Timothy Ryan 
Sandra Early Smith 
David Hugh Swain 
William Howard Toomes, Jr. 
John Errol VanBlaricom 
Marshall Elliott Vermillion 
Chester John Waite 
Clarence Crumpton Watkins, Jr. 



270 



Summer Division 



Stephen Harold Weekley Herbert Ernest Wilson 

Dennis John Wilson Wilfred Buck Yearns, III 

Mary Ellen Yoder 

Bachelor of Science 

Stanley Arthur Dickinson David Sim Siceloff, III 

Sidney John Geibel Julia Kleckley Tison 

Karen Rae Hill Harold Lee Townsend, III 

Robert Timothy Wingate 

GRADUATION DISTINCTIONS 

Cum Laude 

William Franklin Cowley, III Michael Terry Parks 

Phyllis Moore Hole David Sim Siceloff, III 



271 



ROTC GRADUATES COMMISSIONED IN 
THE UNITED STATES ARMY RESERVE 

May 1973 



Kenneth R. Benton 
Richard C. Burton, Jr.* 
Charles D. Coppage 
Joseph S. Gaydica, III 
Robert M. Grant, Jr. 
Randy S. Gregory* 
Charlie A. Hunt, Jr.* 



Frederick H. Martin 

David D. Miller 

Douglas F. Osborne, Jr. 

Carl A. Peterson 

Henry C. T. Richmond, III* 

John R. Schleppegrell, Jr. 

David B. Toth* 



August 1973 



Stanley A. Gest** 
Lindsay W. Gray 



Edward T. Hannum, Jr. 
Michael L. Pezzicola 
Edward T. Tupin 



* Distinguished Military Graduates. 
** Distinguished Military Graduate Commissioned in Regular Army. 



272 



Women 


Totals 


101 

28 


217 

53 


13 


66 
2 



ENROLLMENT - FALL 1973 

Men 
Graduate School 

Wake Forest University: 

Regular 116 

Unclassified 25 

Bowman Gray School of Medicine: 

Regular 53 

Unclassified 2 

196 142 338 

Wake Forest College 

Seniors 428 

Juniors 454 

Sophomores 476 

Freshmen 526 

Unclassified 22 

1,906 1,004 2,910 

School of Law 

Third Year 105 

Second Year 106 

First Year 131 

342 41 383 

Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

Fourth Year 67 

Third Year 72 

Second Year 78 

First Year 79 

296 33 329 

Babcock Graduate School of 
Management 142 14 156 

TOTAL 2,882 1,234 4,116 



208 


636 


292 


746 


244 


720 


245 


771 


15 


37 



7 


112 


13 


119 


21 


152 



6 


73 


6 


78 


5 


83 


16 


95 



273 



Summer Session of 1973 

Men Women Totals 
First Term: 

Graduate Students 

Wake Forest University 

Regular 69 60 129 

Unclassified 14 42 56 

Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

Regular 35 9 44 

Unclassified — — — 

Undergraduate Students 

Regular 264 119 383 

Unclassified 80 99 179 

Law students 42 5 47 

Second Term: 

Graduate Students 

Wake Forest University 

Regular 34 34 68 

Unclassified 4 28 32 

Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

Regular 35 9 44 

Unclassified — — — 

Undergraduate Students 

Regular 146 80 226 

Unclassified 45 27 72 

768 512 1,280 

Duplicates, attended both sessions 173 140 313 

Duplicates, Summer Session 
and Regular Session 293 123 416 

FINAL TOTAL 4,980 



274 



Registration 



Registration by Subject 

Accounting 245 

Anthropology 401 

Art 171 

Biology 1,009 

Business 250 

Chemistry 559 

Chinese 4 

Classics 59 

Economics 534 

Education 579 

English 1,238 

French 542 

German 230 

Greek 17 

Hebrew 9 

Hindi 9 

History 1,005 

Honors 32 

Humanities 83 

Latin 128 

Mathematics 905 

Military Science 64 

Music 388 

Philosophy 430 

Physical Education 1,100 

Physics 269 

Politics 445 

Psychology 874 

Religion , 748 

Russian 6 

Sociology 320 

Spanish 471 

Speech 697 



275 



Geographical Distribution 

Counties in North Carolina 



Alamance 39 

Alexander 6 

Alleghany 4 

Anson 6 

Ashe 8 

Avery 2 

Beaufort 7 

Bertie 1 

Bladen 4 

Brunswick 2 

Buncombe 36 

Burke 11 

Cabarrus 26 

Caldwell 18 

Camden 1 

Carteret 6 

Caswell 3 

Catawba 36 

Chatham 3 

Cherokee 4 

Chowan 2 

Cleveland 38 

Columbus 17 

Craven 13 

Cumberland 41 

Currituck 2 

Dare 1 

Davidson 77 

Davie 8 

Duplin 8 

Durham 31 

Edgecombe 8 

Forsyth 449 

Franklin 12 

Gaston 35 

Gates 5 

Graham 1 

Granville 6 

Greene 2 

Guilford 151 

Halifax 16 

Harnett 13 

Haywood 18 

Henderson 17 



Hertford 9 

Hoke 13 

Hyde 

Iredell 33 

Jackson 1 

Johnston 16 

Jones 1 

Lee 9 

Lenoir 11 

Lincoln 14 

McDowell 5 

Macon 3 

Madison 4 

Martin 7 

Mecklenburg 142 

Mitchell , 3 

Montgomery 11 

Moore 13 

Nash 23 

New Hanover 27 

Northampton 7 

Onslow 9 

Orange 15 

Pasquotank 2 

Pender 3 

Perquimans 1 

Person 10 

Pitt 17 

Polk 3 

Randolph 25 

Richmond 5 

Robeson 27 

Rockingham 39 

Rowan 37 

Rutherford 17 

Sampson 11 

Scotland 19 

Stanley 10 

Stokes 18 

Surry 42 

Swain 1 

Transylvania 6 

Union 17 

Vance 9 



276 



Geographical Distribution 



Wake 115 Wilkes 25 

Warren 3 Wilson 15 

Washington Yadkin 22 

Watauga 13 Yancey 1 

Wayne 19 



States 



Alabama 12 

Alaska 2 

Arizona 3 

Arkansas 6 

California 27 

Colorado 5 

Connecticut 36 

Delaware 37 

District of Columbia 16 

Florida 184 

Georgia 74 

Hawaii 1 

Idaho 2 

Illinois 53 

Indiana 15 

Iowa 4 

Kansas 3 

Kentucky 22 

Louisiana 11 

Maine 2 

Maryland : . . 162 

Massachusetts 29 

Michigan 17 



Minnesota 6 

Mississippi 2 

Missouri 4 

Nevada 1 

New Hampshire 9 

New Jersey 209 

New Mexico 1 

New York 136 

Ohio 81 

Oklahoma 7 

Pennsylvania 193 

Rhode Island ". 4 

South Carolina 123 

Tennessee 65 

Texas 20 

Utah 8 

Vermont 

Virginia 308 

Washington 6 

West Virginia 50 

Wisconsin 3 

Wyoming 1 

U. S. Citizens Abroad 8 



Belgium 

Brazil 

British West Indies 

Canada 

China 

Colombia 

Egypt 

France 

Germany 

Ghana 

Hong Kong 

Ivory Coast 



Foreign Countries 

... 1 Japan 1 

... 1 Lebanon 2 

1 Liberia 1 

3 Malaysia 1 

1 Nigeria 9 

4 Peru 1 

1 Philippines 2 

1 Senegal 1 

1 Taiwan 4 

1 Thailand 2 

3 Turkey 2 

... 1 Yemen 1 



277 



INDEX 



Academic Requirements 

Minimum 89, 99 

Accountancy 123 

Administration 211 

Admission Requirements 15, 90 

Advanced Placement .... 18 
Advanced Standing 

Admission 18 

Advisers 74 

Anthropology 183, 185 

Application Fee 16, 22 

Army R.O.T.C 

Army R.O.T.C. 

Commissions 269 

Art 116 

Art Collection 56 

Artists Series 81 

Asian Studies Program . . 94, 117 

Athletics 11, 71 

Athletics Awards 71 

Intercollegiate 71 

Staff 234 

Attendance Requirements 87 

Auditing 85 

Awards 67 

Babcock Graduate School 

of Management 9, 24, 193 

Basic Course Require- 
ments 100 

Biology 118 

Board of Visitors 210 

Bowman Gray School of 

Medicine 203 

Buildings, Academic .... 51 

Buildings, Residence .... 75 

Buildings and Grounds . . 51 

Business and Accountancy 121 

Calendar 4, 5, 84 

Challenge 66 

Charges 21 

Chemistry 124 

Chinese 179 

Choir Work Grants 36 

Class Schedule 113 

Classical Languages .... 126 

Classics 126, 128 

Classification 84 

CLEP 19 

Coaching Staff 208 

College Union 61 

Committees of the Faculty 218 
Course Conditions 

Removal Procedure . . . 86, 91 

Seniors 91 

Course Numbers 113 

Course Repetition 87 



Course Instruction 

The College 100 

Maximum Number . . . 104 

Creative Arts 9 

Credit Load 84 

Dean's List 92 

Debate and Speech 62 

Debate and Theater 63 

Degrees 

Bachelor of Arts 98 

Bachelor of Science ... 98 

Combined 106 

Doctor of Medicine . . . 206 

Juris Doctor 199 

Master of Arts 192 

Degrees Conferred 253 

Dentistry 110 

Deposits 22 

Divisional Course 

Requirements 101 

Dormitories 75 

Dual Enrollment 18 

Early Decision 17 

Economics 129 

Ecumenical Institute ... 80 

Education 131 

Endowment 50 

Engineering 110 

English 137 

Enrollment Summary . . . 270 

Examinations 24, 85 

Experiment in 

Int'l Living 95 

Faculty 221 

Fees 21 

Fellowships 20 

Fine Arts 141 

Food Services 76 

Forensics 62 

Forestry Ill 

Four- Week Course 99 

France, Semester In ... . 94, 178 

Fraternities 68 

French 176 

Geographical Distribution 273 

German 141 

German Exchange 

Scholarship 

Grading System 85 

Graduate School ... 9, 19, 24, 192 
Graduation 

Distinctions 92 

Fee 22 

Requirements 98 

Greek 127 

Health Service 23, 77 



278 



Index 



Hebrew 175 

Hindi 179 

Historical Sketch 7, 39 

History 143 

Honor Societies 68 

Honor System 59 

Honors Program 

Departmental 8, 93, 116 

Interdisciplinary .... 8, 93, 114 

Housing 12, 75 

Human Enterprises 

Institute 78 

Humanities 147 

India, Semester In 94 

Institute of Literature ... 80 
Interdepartmental 

Courses 147 

Journalism 138 

Lab Courses 113 

Latin 127 

Law School 9, 24, 196 

Libraries 53 

Loan Funds 32 

Location 12 

Majors 104 

Majors in Two Depart- 
ments 105 

Management 24 

Mathematics 149 

Medals 67 

Medical Sciences 107 

Medical Technology .... 108 

Medicine 203 

Men's Residence Council 61 

Microbiology 109 

Military Science 152 

Ministerial Students .... 35 

Music 22, 64, 152 

Navy ROC Program 72 

Norwegian 180 

Open Curriculum 103 

Orientation 74 

Overview 7 

Pass- Fail Grades 86 

Phi Beta Kappa 68 

Philosophy 156 

Physical Education 159 

Physician Assistant 

Program 109 

Physics 163 

Piedmont University 

Center 79 

Placement Office 78 

Politics 165 

Prerequisites 113 

Probation 91 

Professional Schools .... 9 

Psychological Center .... 78 

Psychology 169 

Publications 66 



Purposes and Objectives 14 

Quality Points 86 

Radio 66 

Reading Improvement ... 77 

Readmission 90 

Recreational Activities . . 69 
Registration 

Dates 4, 5 

Procedure 85 

Regulations 88 

Religion 171 

Religious Program 65 

Reports 92 

Renuirements, 

Academic 89, 99, 100 

Robinson Lectures 80 

Romance Languages .... 176 

Room Regulations 76 

Russian 180 

Salem College Courses . . 96 

Scholarships 20, 25 

Senior Orations 63 

Senior Testing Program . . 105 

Social Science 148 

Societies 68 

Sociology and 

Anthropolopv 183 

Snain, Semester In 182 

Spanish 94, 180 

Spanish Exchange 

Scholarship 36 

Speech Communication 

and Theatre Arts 187 

Speech Institute 62 

Student Employment ... 37 
Student-Faculty 

Committees 62 

Student Government .... 59 

Student Judicial Board . . 60 

Studv Abroad 95 

Summer Session 19, 24, 201 

Elsewhere 96 

Teacher Certificate 

Reauirements 132 

Theatre 63 

Transcripts 92 

Trustees 208 

Tuition 21 

Unoer Division 103 

Urban Affairs Institute . . 79 

Venice Program 94 

Veterans 37 

Winter Term 99 

Withdrawal 

From College 24, 89 

From Course 88 

Women's Residence 

Council 62 

Work-Study Program ... 35, 36 



279 



The drawings in the bulletin were made by Stanislav Rembski, a promi- 
nent artist of Baltimore, Maryland. The photographs were made by 
McNabb Studio, Berry, H. Jones and Preslar. 




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Address Correction Requested 
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WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 27109